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National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC.

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Presentation on theme: "National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC

2 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Copyright Information  This presentation, including photos, artwork and copy, is a part of the total Remembering When Program available from the NFPA, to be used exclusively with the Remembering When Program.  Copyrighted 2013 National Fire Protection Association

3 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Remembering When™ A Fall and Fire Prevention Program for Older Adults Program Components:  Group Presentations  Home Visits  8 Fire Prevention Messages  8 Fall Prevention Messages Local Team Members:  Fire and Life Safety Educator  Home Health Professional

4 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Fire Prevention Messages A

5 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Home Structure Fire Civilian Deaths & Injuries, by Age Group: Annual Average Older adults face a higher risk of dying in home fires than do young people. In 2009, people 65 and over made up only 13% of the U.S. population, but they accounted for 30% of the home fire deaths.

6 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC If you smoke, smoke outside. Use deep, sturdy ashtrays. Wet cigarette butts and ashes before throwing them out. Never smoke in bed. Never smoke if medical oxygen is used in the home. Fire Message #1

7 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Give space heaters space. Keep them at least three feet (1 meter) away from anything that can burn – including you. Shut off and unplug heaters when you leave your home or go to bed. Fire Message #2

8 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Stay in the kitchen when frying food. Never leave cooking unattended. Wear tight-fitting clothing or short sleeves when cooking. Use lightweight, easy-to-manage pans. If a pan of food catches fire, slide a lid over it and turn off the burner. Don’t cook if you are drowsy from alcohol or medication. Fire Message #3

9 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Stop, Drop, & Roll. If your clothes catch on fire: Stop (don’t run), Drop gently to the ground, and cover your face with your hands. Roll over and over or back and forth to put out the fire. Use cool water for 3 to 5 minutes to cool a burn. Get medical help right away. Fire Message #4 DROP STOP and ROLL….Over and Over

10 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Smoke alarms save lives. Have smoke alarms installed outside each sleeping area, on every level of your home, and in each bedroom. Interconnected alarms are the best option. When one sounds they all sound. Have someone test your smoke alarms once a month by pushing the test button. Fire Message #5

11 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Plan and practice your escape from fire. If possible, know two ways out of every room in your home and two ways out of the home. Make sure windows and doors open easily. In a fire, get out and stay out. Fire Message #6

12 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Know your local emergency number. It may be or the fire department’s phone number. Once you have escaped a fire, call the fire department from a neighbor’s phone or a mobile phone. Fire Message #7

13 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Plan your escape around your abilities. Have a telephone in your bedroom Post the local emergency number near the phone Have other necessary items near your bed, such as medications, glasses, wheel chair, walker, scooter, or cane. Fire Message #8

14 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Fall Prevention Messages

15 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Preventable Injuries in Older Adults: Falls Non-fatal injuries from falls requiring help from a medical professional (2010) All ages……….………43 per 1000 Persons age 75+….115 per 1000 Graphic source: MMWR Quickstats, 02/03/2012 One out of three adults age 65 and older falls each year but fewer than half talk to their healthcare providers about it.

16 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC  Falls are the most common cause of nonfatal injuries and hospital admissions for trauma.  In 2010, 2.3 million nonfatal fall injuries among older adults were treated in emergency departments and more than 662,000 of these patients were hospitalized.  Among older adults (those 65 or older), falls are the leading cause of injury death. Consequences: fractures, TBI, $$, long term care facilities, death. Centers for Disease Control: Centers for Disease Control: Preventable Injuries in Older Adults: Falls A Vicious Cycle: A fall tends to increase an older adult’s fear of falling. This fear can lead to a decrease in activity. This leads to reduced mobility and fitness which, in turn, increases the risk of falling again.

17 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Exercise Regularly. Exercise builds strength and improves your coordination and balance Ask your doctor about the best physical exercise for you. Fall Message #1

18 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Take your time. Get out of chairs slowly. Sit a moment before you get out of your bed. Stand and get your balance before you walk. Be aware of your surroundings. Fall Message #2

19 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Keep walking areas & stairs clear Keep stairs and walking areas free from hazards: electrical cords shoes clothing books & magazines other clutter. Fall Message #3

20 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Improve the lighting in and outside your home Use night lights to light the path between your bedroom and bathroom. Turn on the lights before using the stairs. See an eye specialist once a year. Fall Message #4

21 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Use non-slip mats Use non-slip mats in the bathtub and on shower floors. Have grab bars installed on the wall in the tub and shower and next to the toilet. Fall Message #5

22 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Be aware of uneven surfaces. Throw rugs must have rubber, non-skid backing. Smooth out wrinkles and folds in carpeting. Be aware of uneven sidewalks and pavement outdoors. Fall Message #6

23 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Stairways should be well lit. Stairways should be well lit from both top and bottom. Have easy-to-grip handrails installed along the full length of both sides of the stairs. Fall Message #7

24 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Wear sturdy, well-fitting shoes Low-heeled shoes with non-slip soles are the best. These are safer than high heels, thick-soled athletic shoes, slippers, or stocking feet. Fall Message #8

25 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC For more information contact:


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