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1 Housing Mark Refowitz, Behavioral Health Director Health Care Agency.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Housing Mark Refowitz, Behavioral Health Director Health Care Agency."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Housing Mark Refowitz, Behavioral Health Director Health Care Agency

2 2 MHSA One-Time Housing Funds $ 9 million to:  Build housing units for FSP clients  Leverage other federal, state, local and private housing funds  Acquire, renovate, or “buy down” mortgage/financingto make units affordable

3 3 Long Term Partnerships  Each housing development tied to an FSP  Client services provided by FSP’s  Potential for on-site staffing by FSP’s

4 4 HCA and OCCS Partnership  Memorandum of Understanding  OCCS to coordinate/facilitate use of one-time housing funds  HCA to provide direction and/or input on needs and coordination with services

5 5 Notice of Funding Availability  Part of OCCS Affordable Rental Housing “Notice of Funding Availability” (NOFA)  2006 NOFA approved by the Board of Supervisors on October 24, 2006

6 6 MHSA Housing Program  Orange County allocation $33,158,300 $22 million housing development $11 million operating subsidies

7 7 MHSA Housing Program  Permanent financing – permanent supportive housing development  MHSA eligible individuals  Administered by CalHFA and DMH

8 8 MHSA Housing Program cont.  Fund 1/3 cost Rental Housing dev. – max $100,000 per MHSA unit  Fund full cost Shared Housing dev. – max $100,000 per MHSA bedroom

9 9 MHSA Housing Program cont.  Shared Housing Bedroom is a unit Maximum number of bedrooms – 5 Single family homes, condos, half-plex

10 10 MHSA Housing Program cont.  Rental Housing development No less than MHSA 5 units Apt 5 to 100 at least 10% MHSA units Apt more than 100 at least 10 MHSA units

11 11 MHSA Housing Program cont.  Applications submitted to CalHFA after: HCA and OCCS review Approval by BHS Director – Mark Refowitz

12 12 MHSA Housing Program  Application can be downloaded on CalHFA website o multifamily/mhsa/ multifamily/mhsa/

13 13 Housing Design  One bedroom apartments  Community room with a kitchen  Office space for one staff per 10 – 15 MHSA tenants  Full kitchen and baths – each unit  Beautiful – blend in with the community

14 14 Housing Design cont. oWindow coverings oClient input into design oStorage oParking oOn-site laundry services

15 15 Housing Design cont.  Furnished and Unfurnished  Air conditioning  Services on-site and off-site  Cable and computer access  Smoking and non-smoking  Close to transportation, shopping, services

16 16 Housing Design cont.  Safe neighborhood  Locations throughout the county  Rent at 30% of AMI  Low security deposits  55 years of affordability

17 17 Housing Design cont. oMinimum 5% of units accessible to physically disabled, 2% accessible to sensory disabled. oMHSA units mixed with general population oProp Mgt experienced with special needs population

18 18 Jackson Aisle  29 unit studio apartment complex  Homeless adults with mental illness  Shelter Plus Care rental subsidies  Developers – A Community of Friends and HOMES, Inc.  Services – Health Care Agency

19 19 Diamond Apartment Homes  25 Apartment Complex  Homeless Families with special Needs  Project-based Section 8  Developers – Jamboree Housing and HOMES, Inc.  Services – Health Care Agency

20 20 Diamond Apartment Homes  Resident Service Center – 2,500 sf Multipurpose room Private offices Demonstration kitchen Computer Room

21 21 Diamond Apartment Homes  15 One bedroom – 700 sf  10 Two bedroom – 825 sf  Outdoor recreation areas  Covered and uncovered parking

22 22 Projects Under Review  Senior Project in Aliso Viejo 2 phases, over 150 units MHSA in phase 1, 90 units/32 one-bedrooms for MHSA Senior Center on-site FSP - OASIS

23 23 Projects Under Review  Midway City Project 130 units 5 to 15 MHSA units

24 24 Projects Under Review  Shared Housing Anaheim – Rome House 6 bedroom house for MHSA seniors Developer – HOMES, Inc FSP - OASIS

25 25 Shelter Plus Care as of leased tenants  73% Mental Illness  11% Substance Abuse  16% HIV/AIDS  5% Veterans  35% Domestic Violence

26 26 Lessons Learned  NIMBY issues really matter Developer and Service Provider need plan to address NIMBY issues Get support key leaders Enlist mental health friendly organizations to network Lots of community meetings Address neighborhood concerns

27 27 Lessons Learned  Even with development $$$$ special needs housing may not be attractive to developers Lack of developers with special needs experience Market rate and affordable housing developers fear that services $$$ will dry up Too much red tape and fear of population

28 28 Lessons Learned  Communication is important Early and continuing communication on a regular basis among developer, property mgt and service provider = success Strong MOU Even if you agree to all details of a project, it keeps evolving and everyone needs to remain on the same page

29 29 Lessons Learned  Involving consumers in the planning process is vital

30 30 Lessons Learned  Partnering with your local housing development agency is valuable Experts in housing development Access to local housing development funding Access to developers and consultants Reviews and advises on projects

31 31 Lessons Learned  Stay vigilant – monitor funding source requirements Developer may using funding sources with tenant population requirements that conflict or are too restrictive (homeless vs at risk of homeless, project based section 8 with narrow preferences)


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