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Identity Management and Resource Allocation in the Network Virtualization Environment Mosharaf Chowdhury School of Computer Science University of Waterloo.

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Presentation on theme: "Identity Management and Resource Allocation in the Network Virtualization Environment Mosharaf Chowdhury School of Computer Science University of Waterloo."— Presentation transcript:

1 Identity Management and Resource Allocation in the Network Virtualization Environment Mosharaf Chowdhury School of Computer Science University of Waterloo January 21, 20091

2 NETWORK VIRTUALIZATION January 21, 20092

3 Why Network Virtualization? Internet is almost ossified – Lots of band-aids and makeshift solutions (e.g., overlays) – A new architecture (aka clean-slate) is needed Hard to come up with a one-size-fits-all architecture – Almost impossible to predict what future might unleash Why not create an all-sizes-fit-into-one architecture instead! – Open and expandable – Coexistence of heterogeneous architectures January 21, 20093

4 What is Network Virtualization? Transparent abstraction of networking platform and resources – Multiple logical interpretations of the physical characteristics Multiple virtual networks (VNs) Additional level of indirection – Indirect access to network resources Resource partitioning and isolation – Physical and logical – Dynamic provisioning and configuration January 21, 20094

5 Network Virtualization Environment January 21, 20095

6 Challenges Instantiation – Concerned with issues related to successful creation of virtual networks Operations – Deals with operations of virtual networks and virtual components Management – Manages co-existing virtual networks January 21, 20096 Virtual Network Embedding Identity Management

7 IMARK Identity Management in the Network Virtualization Environment January 21, 20097

8 Motivation High level of dynamism – Macro Level: Merge/Separate VNs – Micro Level: Add/Join/Migration of end hosts and virtual routers Mobility – Geographical – Logical Überhoming – Simultaneously connect to multiple InPs and VNs January 21, 20098

9 Design Principles 1.Separation of Identity and Location – Inherent support for mobility and Überhoming 2.Local Autonomy – Flexibility of naming and addressing in different VNs – Defined interfaces and mechanisms for cooperation 3.Global Identifier Space – Local identifiers have no end-to-end significance January 21, 20099

10 iMark Overview Concepts 1.Identifier Spaces 2.Mappings Components 1.Controllers 2.Adapters January 21, 200910

11 Operations: Macro Level January 21, 200911 Federation – Multiple VNs create common administrative domain – Controller network Hierarchy – Aggregation of mappings in representative controllers – Balanced and unbalanced

12 Operations: Micro Level Join – Add mappings Lookup and Connection Setup – State setup in the network Leave – Remove mappings Mobility – Soft handoff January 21, 200912

13 Evaluation Mean Mapping Size Per Controller Mean Lookups Resolved January 21, 200913

14 VINEYARD Intra-domain Resource Allocation through Virtual Network Embedding January 21, 200914

15 Virtual Network Embedding January 21, 200915 C AB DEF GH 60 8055 50 7065 85 90 a bc 10 e fd 20 a bc d e f 10 12 55 22 15 12 10 15 17 20 25

16 Substrate Graph Augmentation January 21, 200916 C AB DEF GH 60 8055 50 7065 85 90 22 15 12 10 15 17 20 25 a bc 10 a b c 12 ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞

17 FINALIZATION LINK MAPPING NODE MAPPING INITIALIZATION D-ViNE and R-ViNE For each VN request: – Augment the substrate graph – Solve the resulting LP – For each virtual node: Calculate the probability for each meta-node to be selected for the corresponding virtual node Selection: – D-ViNE: Select the meta-node with the highest probability – R-ViNE: Select a meta-node randomly with the calculated probability – Use MCF to map virtual edges – If the VN request is accepted Update residual capacities of the substrate resources January 21, 200917

18 Acceptance Ratio January 21, 200918

19 Revenue Vs Cost RevenueCost January 21, 200919

20 Resource Utilization Node UtilizationLink Utilization January 21, 200920

21 SUMMARY What have we done? What will we do? January 21, 200921

22 Contributions Survey of Network Virtualization (Submitted + TechReport) – Historical perspective – Categorization of existing projects – Enumeration of open problems Identity Management Framework (IM’09) – Interoperability with flexibility to support mobility and Überhoming Virtual Network Embedding Algorithms (INFOCOM’09) – Better embedding quality – Mathematical foundation January 21, 200922

23 Future Work iMark Prototype Development – Further evaluation Theoretical Analysis of D-ViNE and R-ViNE – Approximation factors – Economic models Inter-domain VN embedding January 21, 200923

24 Collaborators Fida-E Zaheer (iMark) Muntasir Raihan Rahman (ViNEYard) Network Virtualization Project Members January 21, 200924

25 January 21, 200925 Questions? Mosharaf Chowdhury http:// www.mosharaf.com/

26 BACKUP SLIDES January 21, 200926

27 Related Concepts January 21, 200927 1.Virtual Local Area Networks (VLAN) 2.Virtual Private Networks (VPN) 3.Active and Programmable Networks 4.Overlay Networks

28 Downsides of Overlay Networks January 21, 200928 Largely used as narrow fixes for specific problems – No holistic view Most overlays are designed in the application layer – Cannot support radically different concepts Anderson et al. Largely used as narrow fixes for specific problems – No holistic view Most overlays are designed in the application layer – Cannot support radically different concepts Anderson et al.

29 What is a Virtual Network (VN)? January 21, 200929 A collection of virtual nodes and virtual links forming a virtual topology – Subset of physical topology – Basic entity of the NVE A virtual node is hosted on a particular physical node – Multiple virtual nodes can coexist A virtual link spans over a physical path – Includes a portion of the underlying physical resources

30 Business Model Players Infrastructure Providers (InP) – Manage underlying physical networks Service Providers (SP) – Create and manage virtual networks – Deploy customized end-to-end services End Users – Buy and use services from different service providers Brokers – Mediators/Arbiters Relationships January 21, 200930 End User Service Provider Infrastructure Provider Broker IIA SIA NPA SLA EIA

31 Hierarchy of Roles January 21, 200931

32 Basic Concepts Principles Concurrence Recursion Inheritance Revisitation Design Goals Flexibility Manageability Scalability Isolation Stability and Convergence Programmability Heterogeneity Experimental and Deployment Facility Legacy Support January 21, 200932

33 What is Network Virtualization? (Revisited) January 21, 200933 Network virtualization is a networking environment that allows multiple service providers to dynamically compose multiple heterogeneous virtual networks that coexist together in isolation from each other, and to deploy customized end-to- end services on-the-fly as well as manage them on those virtual networks for the end-users by effectively sharing and utilizing underlying network resources leased from multiple infrastructure providers.

34 Classification January 21, 200934 Networking technology – Targeted technology for virtualization Layer of virtualization – Particular layer in the network stack where virtualization is introduced Architectural domain – Specific problem domain that virtualization addresses Level of virtualization – Granularity at which virtualization is realized

35 Existing Projects January 21, 200935 ProjectArchitectural DomainNetworking Technology Layer of Virtualization Level of Virtualization VNRMSVirtual network management ATM/IPNode/Link TempestEnabling alternate control architectures ATMLink NetScriptDynamic composition of services IPNetworkNode GenesisSpawning virtual network architectures NetworkNode/Link

36 Existing Projects (Cont.) January 21, 200936 ProjectArchitectural DomainNetworking Technology Layer of Virtualization Level of Virtualization VNETVirtual machine Grid computing LinkNode VIOLINDeploying on-demand value-added services on IP overlays IPApplicationNode X-BoneAutomating deployment of IP overlays IPApplicationNode/Link PlanetLabDeploy and manage overlay-based testbeds IPApplicationNode UCLPDynamic provisioning and reconfiguration of lightpaths SONETPhysicalLink

37 Existing Projects (Cont.) January 21, 200937 ProjectArchitectural DomainNetworking Technology Layer of Virtualization Level of Virtualization AGAVEEnd-to-end QoS-aware service provisioning IPNetwork GENICreating customized virtual network testbeds Heterogeneous VINIEvaluating protocols and services in a realistic environment Link CABODeploying value-added end-to-end services on shared infrastructure HeterogeneousFull

38 Major Ongoing Projects January 21, 200938 ProjectOriginated InLink 4WARDEuropehttp://www.4ward-project.eu/ AKARIJapanhttp://akari-project.nict.go.jp/ CABOUSAhttp://www.cs.princeton.edu/~jrex/virtual.html Clean SlateUSAhttp://cleanslate.stanford.edu/ GENIUSAhttp://www.geni.net/ NouVeauCanadahttp://netlab.cs.uwaterloo.ca/virtual/ PlanetLabUSAhttp://www.planet-lab.org/ TrilogyEuropehttp://www.trilogy-project.org/ UCLPCanadahttp://www.uclp.ca/ VINIUSAhttp://www.vini-veritas.net/

39 Entities and Identifier Spaces Entities 1.Service Provider 2.Virtual Network 3.Virtual Resource 4.Infrastructure Provider / Physical Network 5.Physical Resource 6.End User Identifier Spaces 1.IDS_ISP 2.IDS_VN 3.IDS_VR 4.IDS_PR 5.IDS_EH January 21, 200939

40 Relationships between Entities January 21, 200940

41 Mappings between Different Identifiers January 21, 200941

42 Sequence Diagram: Join January 21, 200942

43 Sequence Diagram: Lookup January 21, 200943

44 January 21, 200944

45 January 21, 200945

46 D-ViNE January 21, 200946

47 R-ViNE January 21, 200947

48 Summary of Compared Algorithms January 21, 200948

49 January 21, 200949

50 January 21, 200950

51 January 21, 200951


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