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Mr. Ortiz August 2014. “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” - Colin Powell.

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Presentation on theme: "Mr. Ortiz August 2014. “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” - Colin Powell."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mr. Ortiz August 2014

2 “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” - Colin Powell

3  Part I: Multiple Choice Section There will be 4-5 passages to read and 55 multiple-choice questions to answer. You will have 60 minutes on this part of the exam. Multiple choice section is 45% of total score. Scores on this section are based on the number correct; points are not deducted for incorrect answers (so answer all the questions, even if you have to guess!).

4  You will have a 10-minute break between Part I and Part II.  Part II: Free Response Section You will be given a 15-minute reading period, then 120 minutes to write three essays (need to budget about 40 minutes each). This section represents 55% of your total score.

5  The three types of essays in the free response section are: Rhetorical analysis Argumentative Synthesis

6  Rhetorical analysis essay You will have to read a short passage and explain how the author uses various rhetorical techniques to create a desired effect on the reader.

7  Argumentative essay You will be given a small amount of background on a topic and be asked to make and support a claim about that topic.

8  Synthesis essay You will be given 7-8 sources of information of varying types concerning a particular topic; you need to create an argument using at least 3 of those sources for information and support.

9  The multiple choice section is scored by computer.  The essays are scored by College Board readers in early June.  A formula is used to combine multiple choice and essay scores into one total score.  Scores are reported to students and designated colleges in July.

10  To get college credit, you must earn a score of at least ‘3’ on the exam. Note: different colleges have different AP credit policies; check with your target colleges to verify their policy on AP credit. SCOREQUALIFICATION 5Extremely well-qualified 4Well-qualified 3Qualified 2Possibly qualified 1No recommendation

11  When we learn how to estimate your score, you will see that you can earn less than 55% of the total available points and still get a ‘3’!

12  In order to pass the AP Language exam, you need to be able to: Read closely and with a high level of comprehension (and quickly!) while formulating a response at the same time. Identify why and how an author does what he/she does, based on a knowledge of rhetoric. Make a claim and support it effectively with evidence from your knowledge, reading, and personal experience. Make/support a claim citing a variety of sources. Write clearly, logically, and quickly, using correct and sophisticated MUGS.

13  What we do in class is only a fraction of what you need to do to prepare.  Your determination and hard work is what will make the difference.  My role is to be your “coach.” Gabby Douglas - Floor Visa Championships - Sr. Women - Day 2 - YouTube

14  Pick up an AP Language exam prep guide.  Start using the prep guide to prepare several months before the exam to supplement what we do in-class. (Great idea for a Christmas gift!)  Recommended: AP Language Crash Course, by Dawn Hogue 5 Steps to a 5 (AP Language), by Murphy & Rankin CliffsNotes AP Language and Composition, by Barbara Swovelin Cracking the AP English Language & Composition Exam (Princeton Review),

15  Read and write every day! Reading and writing are skills that can be improved with practice.  Focus on nonfiction (esp. short): Journalism (newspapers) Essays and magazine articles Books on a variety of subjects: history, science, politics, art, memoirs, speeches, etc. Websites, blogs  Practice summarizing, analyzing the rhetorical devices you find in writing; respond with your own thoughts.

16  Radio: Start listening to NPR (KPCC 89.3 FM in L.A. – streams online)  Recommended TV shows: Frontline (PBS) PBS Newshour History Detectives (PBS) Nature (PBS) Family Guy, The Simpsons, South Park (FOX, Comedy Central) The Daily Show, The Colbert Report (Comedy Central)  Recommended Films: Too many to name; focus on documentaries (check out Netflix)

17  Recommended websites and blogs: Los Angeles Times (www.latimes.com)www.latimes.com New York Times (www.nytimes.com)www.nytimes.com Huffington Post (www.huffingtonpost.com)www.huffingtonpost.com The Daily Beast (www.thedailybeast.com)www.thedailybeast.com NPR (http://www.npr.org)http://www.npr.org Slate (www.slate.com)www.slate.com Salon (www.salon.com)www.salon.com Mother Jones (www.motherjones.com)www.motherjones.com Christian Science Monitor (www.csmonitor.com)www.csmonitor.com The Onion (www.theonion.com)www.theonion.com


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