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Presentation on theme: "1 of 17 © Boardworks Ltd 2006 This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 of 17 © Boardworks Ltd 2006 This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the User Guide presentation. Articles This icon indicates that the slide contains sound.

2 © Boardworks Ltd 20062 of 17 The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 1 How do I say the in French? In French, there are four words for the : le, la, l’ and les. Four words! So how do you know which one to use ? It depends whether the thing you are describing is masculine, feminine, begins with a vowel or plural.

3 © Boardworks Ltd 20063 of 17 The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 2 If the noun is masculine, you use the word ‘le’: E.g. the hat = le chapeau If the word is feminine, you use the word ‘la’: E.g. the skirt = la jupe

4 © Boardworks Ltd 20064 of 17 If a word begins with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) or an h then you can’t use le or la in front of it, as this makes it quite hard to say. When you say it, you run the two words together: lor-din-at-eur The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 3 Instead, you put l’ in front of it, whether it is masculine or feminine. E.g. L’ordinateur.

5 © Boardworks Ltd 20065 of 17 The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 4 If you want to talk about more than one thing, you use the word ‘les’. You use les, whether the word is masculine or feminine. E.g. les monstres E.g. J’aime les gâteaux. You could translate this sentence as: I like the cakes or just I like cakes. In English, you can leave out the word the, and the sentence means something slightly different, but in French you cannot leave it out. Without it, the sentence doesn’t make sense.

6 © Boardworks Ltd 20066 of 17 When to use the definite article Where in English we use the. E.g. Le livre est sur la table. = The book is on the table. In French, le, la, l’ and les are used: When talking about something in general terms. E.g. Les serpents sont dangereux. = Snakes are dangerous. When expressing likes or dislikes. E.g. J’adore la chimie. = I love chemistry. With names of countries, oceans, mountains, rivers etc. E.g. L’Angleterre = England; Les Alpes = The Alps With time expressions or dates. E.g. L’été, je vais à la plage = In the summer I go to the beach; J’arrive le 12 mai = I arrive on the 12 th May

7 © Boardworks Ltd 20067 of 17 Copy out the grid below, this time putting the correct word for the in front of each noun. un stylo un chien un anorak un ordinateur un livre un vélo un garçon un oiseau une maison une table une voiture une trousse une fille une glace une boulangerie une règle MASCULINE FEMININE Can you spot where to use l’ instead of le or la? The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 5

8 © Boardworks Ltd 20068 of 17 The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 6 Réponses le stylo le chien l’anorak l’ordinateur le livre le vélo le garçon l’oiseau la maison la table la voiture la trousse la fille la glace la boulangerie la règle MASCULINEFEMININE = the house = the table = the car = the pencil case = the girl = the ice-cream = the bakery = the ruler the pen = the dog = the anorak = the computer = the book = the bicycle = the boy = the bird =

9 © Boardworks Ltd 20069 of 17 The definite article – le, la, l’ and les 7

10 © Boardworks Ltd 200610 of 17 The partitive article 1

11 © Boardworks Ltd 200611 of 17 The partitive article 2 When you talk about food, you will often want to say some. For example, ‘I’d like some milk or some biscuits’. To say some or any in French, you use du, de la, de l’ or des. deledu+ delesdes+ du lait – some milk le lait –the milk des biscuits – some biscuits les biscuits –the biscuits

12 © Boardworks Ltd 200612 of 17 The partitive article 3 If the noun is masculine, you use ‘du’: E.g. some butter = du beurre If the noun is feminine, you use ‘de la’: E.g. some meat = de la viande

13 © Boardworks Ltd 200613 of 17 The partitive article 4 With masculine or feminine nouns starting with a vowel (or a silent h), use de l’: E.g. some garlic = de l’ ail With plural nouns, use des: E.g. some apricots = des abricots

14 © Boardworks Ltd 200614 of 17 When to use the partitive article Note that in English, we don’t always use the word some, but in French, du, de la, de l’ or des is always used: Qu’est-ce que tu as acheté? Des fraises. What did you buy? (Some) Strawberries. So the rule is: If you could say some in front of the noun in English, then you must use du / de la / de l’ or des in French! J’ai de l’argent. I have (some) money. Je mange de la soupe. I am eating (some) soup.

15 © Boardworks Ltd 200615 of 17 When not to use the partitive article If you are talking about just one item, use un or une rather than du / de la / de l’ or des: Qu’est-ce que tu as acheté? Une pomme. What did you buy? An apple. If you are making a negative sentence use: – de instead of du, de la or des – d’ instead of de l’. After expressions of quantity use de or d’. Je n’ai pas de chocolat.I don’t have any chocolate. Un paquet de céréales.A packet of cereal.

16 © Boardworks Ltd 200616 of 17 The partitive article 5

17 © Boardworks Ltd 200617 of 17 The partitive article 6


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