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Strategy for Vital Neighborhoods Working together in the places Garland lives, works, learns, plays and shops.

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Presentation on theme: "Strategy for Vital Neighborhoods Working together in the places Garland lives, works, learns, plays and shops."— Presentation transcript:

1 Strategy for Vital Neighborhoods Working together in the places Garland lives, works, learns, plays and shops.

2 Garland’s Neighborhood Philosophy Recognizing a strength of Garland is the character of its neighborhoods, we will work in partnership with neighborhood stakeholders and community resources to build a stronger community and keep Garland an excellent place to live and invest.

3 Envisioned Outcomes  Stabilized and improved neighborhoods  Sense of community  Increased neighborhood management capacity

4 Today’s Situation  Limited resources necessitate neighbors working in partnership to maximize return on investment.  Garland is comprised of neighborhoods of various ages, strengths, weaknesses, issues, and levels of involvement, and all merit attention to stay healthy, stabilize, and improve.  The City Council and City Administration have directed focus on Garland neighborhoods.  The proposed Neighborhood Strategy provides a framework for addressing neighborhood issues.

5 How Did We Get Here?  The Neighborhood Vitality Coordinator position was created to support neighborhood organizations and develop neighborhood capacity-building programs.  Reorganization of departments consolidated planning and neighborhood outreach functions.  A Neighborhood Planner was hired.  The Neighborhood Strategy Coordination Team developed a strategy that is designed to: offer something to all of Garland’s neighborhoods offer something to all of Garland’s neighborhoods cultivate involvement, collaboration, and empowerment cultivate involvement, collaboration, and empowerment utilize data collected through the Neighborhood Benchmarking Program but not rely solely on that data source utilize data collected through the Neighborhood Benchmarking Program but not rely solely on that data source encourage partnerships between the City and the community encourage partnerships between the City and the community focus on programs for improvement but does not grade neighborhoods focus on programs for improvement but does not grade neighborhoods recognize that neighborhoods are more than residential subdivisions but the businesses, offices, schools and residents of an area recognize that neighborhoods are more than residential subdivisions but the businesses, offices, schools and residents of an area

6 Success is dependent on a culture change emphasizing collaboration at the neighborhood level and this message must come from the top and be marketed throughout the City and the community.

7 Neighborhood Strategy  Neighborhood Assessments  Neighborhood Grouping System  Neighborhood Program Areas  Neighborhood Toolbox  Implementation  Marketing

8 Neighborhood Assessments Resources used to study and understand the issues of specific neighborhoods. Benchmark Analysis of resident surveys collected by ODT Benchmark Analysis of resident surveys collected by ODT Neighborhood Information System Data compares City’s targets with resident opinion surveys Neighborhood Information System Data compares City’s targets with resident opinion surveys Leadership and Organization Assessments by Office of Neighborhood Vitality Leadership and Organization Assessments by Office of Neighborhood Vitality Windshield surveys by Neighborhood Strategy Coordination Team Windshield surveys by Neighborhood Strategy Coordination Team

9 Neighborhood Grouping System Describes four types of neighborhood project areas.  Attempts to avoid consequences associated with ranking or grading neighborhoods  Recognizes that all neighborhoods need attention or risk decline  Provides a structure for establishing project work programs  Allows for a variety of program offerings  Establishes a framework for collaboration and mentoring across neighborhoods

10 Neighborhood Program Areas Grouped by characteristics related to Infrastructure, Quality of Life, Neighborhood Appearance, Public Services Neighborhood Strategy Area - significant infrastructure needs, low ratings for quality of life issues, significant neighborhood appearance concerns, less satisfaction with public services Neighborhood Strategy Area - significant infrastructure needs, low ratings for quality of life issues, significant neighborhood appearance concerns, less satisfaction with public services Neighborhood Revitalization Area – some infrastructure needs, moderate ratings for quality of life issues, some neighborhood appearance issues Neighborhood Revitalization Area – some infrastructure needs, moderate ratings for quality of life issues, some neighborhood appearance issues Neighborhood Enhancement Area – slight infrastructure needs, minor quality of life issues Neighborhood Enhancement Area – slight infrastructure needs, minor quality of life issues Neighborhood Outreach Area – few infrastructure or quality of life issues, primarily newer neighborhoods Neighborhood Outreach Area – few infrastructure or quality of life issues, primarily newer neighborhoods

11 Neighborhood Toolbox New and existing programs that assist neighborhoods:  Office of Neighborhood Vitality programs  Management capacity-building programs  City of Garland neighborhood programs (neighborhood watch, grant programs, publications)  Neighborhood Planning programs  Neighborhood Resource Team – action-oriented working group of City employees that strategically implements programs and services to reach envisioned outcomes  Community Resource Team – task force of subject matter experts that advise staff during pilot process to develop programs

12 Neighborhood Resource Team Member Characteristics  Visionary  Results oriented  Good people skills  Community oriented  Unified commitment to envisioned outcomes  Cultivation and encouragement of different viewpoints  Team oriented

13 Community Resource Team  Comprised of 10 to 15 field experts appointed based on expertise rather than district representation.  Staff will conduct background research to develop a proposed slate of candidates.  Individual council members will suggest potential candidates during slate development process.  Slate of candidates will be presented to the City Council for approval.  Team will meet periodically for approximately 4 to 6 months.

14 Implementation  Neighborhood Strategy Coordination Team presents proposed pilot projects to City Administration and City Council  City Manager and Team presents the Strategy to Managing Directors  Directors designate candidates to the Neighborhood Resource Team  Council designates candidates to the Community Resource Team  Excitement for the program is generated with a kick-off conference to include Resource Teams and neighborhood representatives from the pilot project areas  Marketing campaign gets underway to sell and promote the Strategy’s message within the community and City’s organizational structure  Pilot projects are initiated. Note: Periodic updates to City Council will be required as pilot project scopes and timelines are finalized and as determination of future projects is decided.

15 Marketing  Work with the Public Information Officer to develop a marketing plan  Fully develop program logo and tag line: Garland neighborhood’s are where  Create a program for viewing on Channel 15  Utilize traditional public relations methods  Develop educational and teambuilding programs for the Neighborhood Resource Team  Hold a conference or Neighborhood Summit Techniques for Creating Neighborhoods of Choice Techniques for Creating Neighborhoods of Choice Reading Neighborhoods Reading Neighborhoods Breakout Sessions: Management, Image, Physical Conditions, Influence of Social Capital Breakout Sessions: Management, Image, Physical Conditions, Influence of Social Capital What Does It Mean for Garland? What Does It Mean for Garland? Presentation of Garland’s Neighborhood Strategy Presentation of Garland’s Neighborhood Strategy

16 Proposed Pilot Projects  Neighborhood Strategy Area  Neighborhood Revitalization Area  Neighborhood Enhancement Area  Neighborhood Outreach Area

17 Neighborhood Strategy Area: Terrace-Bellaire Characteristics  CDBG eligible  Organized, active associations  Neighborhood Watch  Established City relationship  Carver Center, proximity to downtown Opportunities  Outreach to Spanish-speaking stakeholders  Partnership with South First Street organizations

18 Neighborhood Revitalization Area: Forest Ridge-Walnut Characteristics  Police’s Apartment Manager’s Association  New recreation center  Portions CDBG eligible  Individual leaders  Large number of apartments  Some negativity among residents Opportunities  Development of new recreation center  Analyze impacts of demographic shift

19 Neighborhood Enhancement Area: Carriage House Characteristics  Homes receiving investment  Near 190 and new retail  Scheduled transportation improvements  Combination of older and newer developments  Unclear status of neighborhood organizations Opportunities  Identify leadership  Build consensus

20 Neighborhood Outreach Area: Oakridge Characteristics  Single-family residential has solid, involved organizations  Oakridge Neighborhood Association has prioritized goals  Little integration with new, adjacent development and apartment community Opportunities  Groom as a mentor organization for nearby neighborhoods  Assist with plan implementation

21 Examples of Program Activities  Leadership development  Build social capital  Physical enhancements  Improve neighborhood image  Teambuilding  Safety programs  Mentoring programs  Neighborhood planning  Project implementation  Branding neighborhoods

22 Schedule 08/06 Identify and organize NRT and CRT, set agenda for neighborhood summit, research pilot areas, coordinate publicity with PIO. 09/06 Training and teambuilding of NRT, send invitations to summit, outreach to pilot areas, test marketing, affirm CRT. 10/06 Prepare and conduct neighborhood summit. 11/06 Kick-off pilot programs, plan offerings of GNU. 12/06 Set priorities and work plan for CRT and pilots. 01/07 Coordinate NRT work plan and activities of pilots. 02/07 Initiate NRT activities, draft CRT report, GNU opens. 03/07 NRT discusses new program areas, present CRT report to Council, conduct Class 2 of GNU. 04/07 Present new program areas to Council, completion of CRT, wrap-up NOA and NEA activities, Council considers CRT recommendations and approves new NPAs, Class 3 of GNU. 05/07 Initiate work in two additional NPAs, Council provides direction to City Manager regarding program areas, Class 4 GNU. 07/07Wrap-up NRA and NSA activities.


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