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4/8 Warm-Up 1. Take a look at the picture hanging below the “Warning, Deadlines are closer…” poster. What is this? Is it art? Why or why not? What materials.

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Presentation on theme: "4/8 Warm-Up 1. Take a look at the picture hanging below the “Warning, Deadlines are closer…” poster. What is this? Is it art? Why or why not? What materials."— Presentation transcript:

1 4/8 Warm-Up 1. Take a look at the picture hanging below the “Warning, Deadlines are closer…” poster. What is this? Is it art? Why or why not? What materials do you think it’s made of? Who would wear this? When? Where? What do you think of it? Explain. Sketch your own version of this.

2 Native North American Art This type of art is extraordinarily rich and diverse. Today Native artists, male and female, trained in their communities and in professional art schools, and living in cities and on reserves, work in a broad range of media and expressive styles. A lot of the work we will look at comes from the early 1800s. There is not one “type” of Native American art; each region, community, and tribe all seem to have their own style of art. Originally, these objects were produced in different cultural contexts and for altogether different purposes.

3 Apache Indians The Apache are natives of the Southwest deserts (particularly in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas). Some Apache people were also located across the border in northern Mexico. Apache artists are famous for their fine beadwork and basketry.

4 Hopi Indians

5 Zuni

6 Kwakwaka'wakw numbering about 5,500, who live in British Columbia on northern Vancouver Island and the adjoining mainland and islands. The first European contact documented was in Kwakwaka'wakw arts are exemplified in totem poles, masks, wooden carvings, jewelry and woven blankets. Visual arts are defined by simplicity, realism, and artistic emphasis.

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8 Totem poles are an ancient tradition of the Indian tribes of the Pacific Northwest Coast--Washington state in the USA, British Columbia in Canada--and some of the Athabaskan tribes of southern Alaska. Contrary to popular belief, the Southwest Indians, Plains Indians, and Inuit never carved totem poles (think of how there are no trees big enough!) Native American totem poles are not only aesthetically pleasing; they are also culturally significant to the indigenous people who made them. Native American totem poles can be a symbol of the history of a family or of the whole tribe. They can also be a record of traditions, legends, or spiritual stories. Native American totem poles are hand carved from large pieces of wood. They usually contained themes and were covered with pictures of animals. They often sat in the center of a family’s tent and if they had to be moved only a man could carry it. In other cases the poles were placed outside of the tents as a status symbol.

9 A totem is actually an animal guide that is assigned to an individual; a totem pole is a piece of wood that is carved with a persons totems. Native Americans tradition states a person is assigned nine animal guides that provide spiritual direction both in this life and the next.’ Among these nine is one main guardian spirit that is designated as the totem animal. This guardian can convey wisdom and direction only if a person recognizes the animal and understands how to communicate with it.

10 WHAT IS YOUR TOTEM ANIMAL? Similes= is a figure of speech that directly compares two things through some connective, usually "like," "as," "than," or a verb such as "resembles How can you use animals in a simile? Brave as a ___________ Sweet as a _____________ Wise as an ___________ What are some of your personality traits? What animals are they similar to?

11 For your project…. You will be creating a drawing on rainbow scratchboard paper, of a chosen totem animal. Choose your totem animal by looking through National Geographic magazines, self-reflecting, looking through the worksheet, and taking an online quiz. Incorporate different characteristics of Native North American art that you have seen here, online, and other research tools; patterns, texture, line, shape (geometric, simplified).

12 TODAY: -Brainstorm list of personality traits in DW -- Look through list of animals, pick a few you feel connect to you -- Take quiz online and check out other websites -- sketch 2 animals in your DW -- by the end of class, have you final TOTEM ANIMAL chosen.


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