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1 Picture Perfect Generation Visual Stimulating or Visually Literate? Visual Stimulating or Visually Literate? Susan E. Metros University.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Picture Perfect Generation Visual Stimulating or Visually Literate? Visual Stimulating or Visually Literate? Susan E. Metros University."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Picture Perfect Generation Visual Stimulating or Visually Literate? Visual Stimulating or Visually Literate? Susan E. Metros University of Southern California

2 2 Webinar audience

3 3 t h e j o u r n e y Becoming Visually Literate Affecting change The role of the visual What does it mean to be literate? Questions?

4 4 t h e j o u r n e y What does it mean to be literate?

5 5 Literacy… …the condition or quality of being literate, especially the ability to read and write.

6 6

7 7 21 st Century Literacies Scientific Ecological Political Economic Cultural Language Media Information Technological Visual Personal Security

8 8 Visual Literacy  Decode and interpret visuals  Encode and compose meaningful visuals  Make judgment of accuracy, validity and worth of visuals

9 9 Richard Avedon Judging Validity… “There is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.”

10 10 Judging Validity… Luke Frazza, AFP, USA Today, February 24, 2005

11 11 visual literacy continuum Stimulated Literate Fluent

12 12  Lives is a visually saturated word  Interacts with visuals everyday  Amateur producer and manipulator  Imitates rather than innovates  Not enough knowledge to judge visual literacy continuum Stimulated

13 13 Visual Overload  Environment  Communication  Knowledge gathering  Personal interactions  Jobs  Recreation

14 14 Visual Overload “Clutter and confusion are failures in design, not attributes of information.” (Tufte, 1990)

15 15 Amateur or Authentic? Authentic  denoting an emotionally appropriate, significant, purposive, and responsible mode of human life. Amateur  Unprofessional  Producers not visually literate

16 16 Literate  Understands design vocabulary and concepts  Informed viewer, decoder, and consumer  Effective communicator, encoder and producer  Informed critic of visual information visual literacy continuum

17 17  Is a knowledgeable and highly- skilled innovator, designer, composer, and producer visual literacy continuum Fluent

18 18 t h e j o u r n e y Affecting change The role of the visual What does it mean to be literate? Questions? Becoming Visually Literate

19 19 t h e j o u r n e y Becoming Visually Literate Learning Styles Dependencies Vocabularies

20 20 Learning Styles  A behavioral preference  The way we perceive and process things the best  The way people concentrate when they learn Visual Auditory Kinesthetic

21 21 Learning Styles (Bradford, 2004)

22 22 Visual Dependencies  Communicate instantly and universally  Social practice  Economic reliance  Discipline agnostic

23 23 Vocabularies  Writing letterwordsentenceparagraph rhythmprotagonistantagonist settingpoint of viewhyperbole personification…  Journalism articlestorybeatrepurposelead kickerspreadinverted pyramid…  Film scenescriptpacenarration framingzoom pantiltfadecut…

24 24 Vocabulary of Vision “If people aren’t taught the language of sound and images, shouldn’t they be considered as illiterate as if they left college without being able to read or write?” (Lucas, 2004)

25 25 Attributes  Color/Tone  Texture  Volume  Size Elements  Point  Line  Form Relationships  Structure  Balance  Contrast  Position  Motion Vocabulary of Vision

26 26 t h e j o u r n e y The role of the visual

27 27 The Role of the Visual  Document  Validate  Communicate  Inform  Engage  Expose  Politicize  Provoke

28 28 Document The War Tapes, (2006)

29 29 Validate Children’s Visions of Genocide (Human Rights Watch, NPR, 2005)

30 30 Communicate

31 31 Inform World Trade Center, NYC (September 11, 2001)

32 32 Engage Spore, Electronic Arts (2008)

33 33 Expose Abu Ghraib Prison (May, 2005)

34 34 Politicize “Politics will eventually be replaced by imagery. The politician will be only too happy to abdicate in favor of his [or her] image, because the image will be much more powerful than he [or she] could ever be.” (McLuhan,1971) Kennedy/Nixon Presidential Debate (September 26,1960)

35 35 Provoke A cartoon published in a Danish newspaper depicting Muhammad's turban as a bomb provoked…  Protest marches and deadly riots worldwide  Attacks and the burning of Danish embassies throughout the Middle East  Costly boycotts of Danish products

36 36 t h e j o u r n e y Affecting change The role of the visual What does it mean to be literate? Questions? Becoming Visually Literate

37 37 t h e j o u r n e y  Four Models 1.Come to us 2.Woven into the curriculum 3.Systemic change 4.Component of something bigger! Affecting change

38 38 digitalunion.osu.edu Come to us: OSU Digital Union  New media production  Emerging technologies  Gathering place  Showcase new tools  Workshops  Research  Corporate sponsors

39 39 Woven into the curriculum: USC Institute for Multimedia Literacy  Research on the changing nature of literacy  Teaches multimedia production  Provides academic programs in MM scholarship iml.usc.edu

40 40 Woven into the curriculum: Visual literacy integrated into the mission  Association of Colleges and Research Libraries (ACRL) Guidelines… “Library courses and instruction in information literacy should include visual literacy and media literacy.”  Clemson General Education Vision… “To more fully integrate visual literacy and creativity into the curriculum in an effort to expand communication skills, critical thinking, ethical judgment, and cultural awareness.”

41 41 (NMC, 2005) nmc.org/publications/global-imperative Systemic change: NMC 21 st Century Literacy Summit 1.Develop a strategic research agenda 2.Raise awareness and visibility of the field 3.Make tools for creating and experiencing new media broadly available 4.Empower teachers with 21 st century literacy skills 5.Work as a community

42 42 Component of something bigger: Emergency Preparedness  USC Provost’s charge  Have courses up for one to three weeks within one week of the disaster  Assumptions  Campus is inaccessible  Power and Internet up and running  Misconception  Blackboard is the solution  A captured lecture is a course

43 43 Component of something bigger: Scenario 1: “Gen Ed in the Can”  Select best Gen Ed instructors  Develop high quality online courses in Bb  Activate in case of emergency Issues  Who picks instructors?  Who prioritizes courses?  Who develops courses?  Expense  Currency of content  Students distracted

44 44 Component of something bigger: Scenario 2: “Global Crisis Curriculum”  Identify, collect, tag content related to crisis  Provide Freshman literacy skills modules to: 1.Create a digital story 2.Serve as a citizen journalist 3.Chronicle service learning experience 4.Write a paper  Respond to crisis through “lens” of Gen Ed course Issues  Curricular review?  Cathartic or painful?  How to coordinate efforts  How to build content sharing infrastructure

45 45 t h e j o u r n e y Affecting change The role of the visual What does it mean to be literate? Questions? Becoming Visually Literate


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