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Building a Personal Brand (Follow the Good, Avoid the Bad, and Prepare for the Ugly) Building a Personal Brand (Follow the Good, Avoid the Bad, and Prepare.

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Presentation on theme: "Building a Personal Brand (Follow the Good, Avoid the Bad, and Prepare for the Ugly) Building a Personal Brand (Follow the Good, Avoid the Bad, and Prepare."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building a Personal Brand (Follow the Good, Avoid the Bad, and Prepare for the Ugly) Building a Personal Brand (Follow the Good, Avoid the Bad, and Prepare for the Ugly) Bill Peeper, CEO (retired), Orlando, Orange County Convention and Visitors Bureau

2 Building Your Personal Brand Learn from the good CVB executives, the bad, and prepare for the Ugly Know the external success factors - friends to grow and the foes to know

3 What We Did & Why & Why You Should Care DMAI Education Committee Support Interviewed Twenty Two CVB Executives Divided into “more” versus “less” successful Six Small CVBs – less than $2 million budget Six Medium CVBs – $2-10 million budgets Six Large CVBs – more than $10 million Four Internationals – not categorized Plus talked to: National Hotel Sales Executives Meeting Planner Executives Meeting Planner Executives

4 Managing Destination Marketing Organizations: The Tasks, Roles and Responsibilities of the Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Chapter 1: Introduction and Overview Chapter 2: Historical Foundations of the CVB Industry Chapter 3: Importance of Mission in Aligning Everyone Chapter 4: Governance Chapter 5: Selling the Community Chapter 6: Selling the Destination Chapter 7: Managing the CVB Operation Chapter 8: Managing the Marketing of the Destination Chapter 9: Creating and Sustaining a Strong CVB Culture Chapter 10: Communicating CVB Value Chapter 11: Developing the CVB Executive Chapter 12: Future Challenges for the CVB Executive

5 Personal Branding (Wikipedia) Personal branding is the process whereby people and their careers are marked as brands. It has been noted that while previous self-help management techniques were about self-improvement, the personal branding concept suggests instead that success comes from self- packaging. The term is thought to have been first used and discussed in an 1997 article by Tom Peters.

6 Why Having a Personal Brand is Important to You Because my Hartford guy said so Everything that you say, do, and write reflects on your personal brand and your CVB and vice versa – that is, a CVB executive that is branded as successful is known as part of a successful CVB Successful CVBs result from the effective practice of management

7 The CVB Executive’s Job Imagine a job where you are hired and evaluated by one group of people and funded by another. The group evaluating you sees your work responsibilities as properly focused on short-run, industry-specific results because members of the group are themselves evaluated on those results. But the group funding you sees your work responsibilities as focused on long-term, community-wide results as members of this group are evaluated that way. To make this job more challenging, imagine that neither group understands the perspective of the other. The members of each group are preoccupied with pressing issues in their own jobs and tend to be ignorant of or indifferent to the other group needs, wants, and political realities.

8 The CVB Executive’s Job Finally, just to make this job virtually impossible, imagine that the task for which you are hired and evaluated is to sell an intangible product that is subjectively measured and over which you have no control with respect to pricing, quality, or quantity. And even if you persuade a customer to buy the product, the organization that owns or controls it may not want to sell it to the customer on the terms the customer wants. In that situation you will have to sell the product owner on the customer after you have sold the customer on the product just to meet the goals for which you will be evaluated!

9 What We Plan to DO? Any questions you’d like us to answer? Lessons learned from comparing the Successful with the Less Successful CVB Executives (Good vs. Bad) A visit to customers and hotel partners A peek into the future

10 The Good Top Ten Things We Learned from Successful CVB Executives

11 1. Successful CVB Executives engage their boards in developing clear focused mission statements. ( They know why CVBs were created and stick to their knitting.) The Good

12 “ If you ain’t booking the business, the rest of it is irrelevant because you aren’t going to be there anyway.” Small Market CVB Executive The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks

13 The Good 2. Successful CVB Executives make sure that everything they write, say, and do is aligned with the mission.

14 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “ I think the mission statement is used to a great degree. It doesn't mean that we didn’t steer away from it sometimes to our advantage, but to a great degree the mission and the accomplishments went hand in hand, people were pushed by the mission, and I think that had a great deal to do with our success.” Large Market CVB Executive

15 The Good 3. Successful CVB Executives don’t take trust and board support for granted. (They keep their boards engaged and demand formal measurable evaluations for both them and the CVB annually.)

16 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “My contract requires an annual review. It also says if I am not given one it means I am doing a satisfactory job and I send a memo to the compensation committee to remind them of that. I also try to meet with each board member at least once a year to sit in their environment to hear their concerns, questions, or suggestions.” Large Market CVB Executive

17 The Good 4. Successful CVB Executives are communication fanatics. They work hard to constantly communicate their mission and activities to all stakeholders (e.g., industry, members, employees, media, funders, community & especially board)).

18 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “I would say I spend 35% of the time out of my office with customers and 65% with stakeholders, hoteliers, board members, restaurateurs, people who are involved in the community that can help move us forward…We like to keep visibility locally at a peak level.” Small Market CVB Executive

19 The Good 5. Successful CVB Executives spend time with those that can influence allocation of critical resources (When they can’t be with the ones they love, they love the ones they’re with).

20 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks Running a convention and visitor’s bureau is every bit as complex as running any private sector entity. You have everybody grabbing at you and everybody thinks they own you, your leaders, your members, your customers, your funding sources. And you know what? I really think there’s a mastery to that. You have to enjoy doing that.” “Running a convention and visitor’s bureau is every bit as complex as running any private sector entity. You have everybody grabbing at you and everybody thinks they own you, your leaders, your members, your customers, your funding sources. And you know what? You need to be able to make each of them feel as though they do. I really think there’s a mastery to that. You have to enjoy doing that.” Large Market CVB Executive

21 6. Successful CVB Executives systematically identify key stakeholders and seek ways to engage them in their mission driven activities. The Good

22 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “ I try to spend a good deal of my time out of the office either seeing hoteliers face-to-face or attending meetings where I’m going to see them. Also, I want to be out in the community or talking to groups to get the word out about the importance of this industry. I really try to spend a good deal of time out of the office. That's the most productive time for me, because that’s where you’re swaying opinion or reinforcing the importance of this industry.” Small Market CVB Executive

23 The Good 7. Successful CVB Executives gladly spend time and energy building trust with all stakeholders. (They are known for candor, openness, transparency, and specificity in their answers. They avoid secrets and surprises.)

24 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “…you need people to trust you, that you’re headed in the right direction. Trust that you’re open about where the money is spent. Trust that there is influence other than my personal preference on performance measures. People know that our performance measures get set by the board and get debated there and so forth….trust is maybe the greatest asset a bureau can have. Because, and I’ve heard this, they say even when we don’t think what you’re doing is the right thing, we still trust the bureau. But that’s not always there. It’s so easy to lose the trust.” Middle Market CVB Executive

25 The Good 8. Successful CVB Executives seek out ways to measure everything that can show their CVB effectiveness to all stakeholders. ( They can prove what they do and how well they do it so even the press believes.)

26 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “We identified each of these things as to what we were going to be doing. We talked about how we were tracking our efforts to deliver more in the market place in a number of arenas…We had very specific “here’s our measures and here's where we are trying to move them” statements.” Large Market CVB Executive

27 The Good 9. Successful CVB Executives set measurable goals for everyone that works in their CVBs and hold each team member accountable for goal achievement.

28 The Good: An Executive Speaks “I guess setting goals is a logical thing. We’re a very performance driven bureau. We’ve got about 74 different key performance issues. That’s in part because of accountability. We have very high expectations. All measures are transparent. When we wanted to set up the incentive program, we became more focused on setting goals because you want them to motivate people to achieve them. There can be a stretch factor. We get some healthy debate on setting our goals, but we’re pretty focused on where we want to get to at the end of the year.” International CVB Executive

29 The Good 10. Successful executives have a passionate commitment to a destination vision that inspires all inside and outside the CVB.

30 The Good: A Successful Executive Speaks “Good business leaders create a vision, articulate the vision, passionately own the vision, and relentlessly drive it to completion.” Jack Welch, Former Chairman, General Electric

31 The Bad The Top Ten Things that Less Successful Executives Did that Helped Make Them Less Successful.

32 1. They think they own the job. The Bad

33 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “I think that the lessons I learned is understanding the value of the position. You really don’t own the business. It’s not your business. There’s a tendency over time to forget about that and that’s a lesson that I’ll never again underestimate.” Middle Market CVB Executive

34 The Bad 2. They don’t listen to the board members that tell them they need to do something that they don’t want to do. (After all, they are the professionals and you shouldn't try this at home.)

35 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “You really have to have the approach of being a rookie. When you’re a rookie, everything’s open. You do everything. When you become a veteran, you no longer have a rookie mentality. You don’t want to do things anymore. I think you always have to have a rookie viewpoint.” Middle Market CVB Executive

36 The Bad 3. They tend to stake out their own positions and defend them instead of realizing their role is to mediate conflicting stakeholder’s views.

37 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “ A big big issue out there today is people are really not listening. I would have liked to have listened better when the message is, “this isn’t working.” Your tendency is to defend it - that it is working because you have a lot of anecdotal evidence and you have a lot of third party evidence, you have a lot of quantitative evidence and think that you are right. It takes a real headiness and ability to not try to defend what you’ve done. If major leaders are saying it ain’t working, it’d be better for me to understand that point of view and investigate it for its virtue versus trying to defend what we have done.” Middle Market CVB Executive

38 The Bad 4. They think they are doing a good job by their own standards – they forget to make sure that their board agrees with the metrics.

39 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “I always looked at the business side of things – if I’m pulling in the numbers, if I’m bringing in the money, then why would anybody mess with me? I don’t have to kiss anybody’s ass on top of that – that should be sufficient. I would focus on that aspect of it and not be as open to some things they were asking and they were coming to me asking dumb stuff. They were stupid things and I kind of shrugged them off. Looking back, would that have been so bad to do? No. It wouldn’t have hurt to play a little more ball and to work a little bit overtime to let that Mayor know that I could be your guy too, in essence, which I didn’t.” Small Market CVB Executive

40 The Bad 5. They don’t believe in research or numbers or goal setting.

41 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “We’re so goofy. We can look at numbers and see whether hotel occupancy or whatever compare with some others. We are so different because we are so far from everybody – the next place is another country. We’ve got different kinds of markets. We don’t do many group tours because we’re so far away. Plus our average daily rate is so much higher than most places in this part of the country. I get very critical of statistics. It’s so hard to get apples vs. apples when we’re comparing us against somebody else.” Middle Market CVB Executive

42 The Bad 6. They are too busy selling to talk to other stakeholders.

43 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “The stakeholders that got the most amount of my time were the ones that I described earlier – my customers and members. The ones that got the least amount of my time, or deserved the least amount of my time were all the governmental people. I’m not trying to lump all the government activity together. There were some, however, that was just wasteful and others that were positive and important. Clearly, that’s why collectively they probably got the least amount of my time. They were consistent – they only held meetings during the day, and we used to do our real work at night.” Middle Market CVB Executive

44 The Bad 7. They are unwilling to accept much responsibility for their destination stakeholders not “getting it”.

45 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “They (the politicals) don’t understand what we do and they don’t want to understand it. It’s hard talking economics to a bunch of housewife activists who got elected to the council. I don’t mean to be critical. That’s how they get elected to city council. They’re only concerned about the alleys, the garbage collection and the pot holes and stuff in their neighborhoods and that’s it. Working with them was very very difficult.” Middle Market CVB Executive

46 The Bad 8. They didn’t like to evaluate their own employees or take the time to do goal setting.

47 The Bad: Two Less Successful Executives Speak “The thing I didn’t like the most is doing evaluations of employees. That was a real chore.” Small Market CVB Executive “In a perfect world I would have gotten rid of personnel and the political end of it. I would have preferred to spend my time wooing customers.” Large Market CVB Executive

48 9. They don't feel collaboration with other industry partners is necessary The Bad

49 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “There was always too much territorial – there’s another word - where everybody wanted to protect their pot. There was too much parochialism of all of the CVBs.” Large Market CVB Executive

50 The Bad 10. They have the answers and there is nothing left to learn.

51 The Bad: A Less Successful Executive Speaks “I had seven people reporting to me because there was nobody there who had ever had been in a major league city before. Other than the folks who had been there forever, none had even been in a convention bureau. They didn’t know the business and I had to teach them the business and at the same time do my own work.” Large Market CVB Executive

52 Eight Roles of Management We asked all our interviewees to give us a self-assessment of how they viewed the various roles of a CVB manager

53 How Interviewed CVB Executives Ranked the Eight Management Roles of Quinn RoleSuccessfulLess Successful Broker1 (6.2)4 (5.87) Producer2 (5.9)1 (6.3) Director2 (5.9)2 (6.2) Innovator4 (5.6)3 (5.9) Mentor5 (5.45)5 (5.8) Facilitator6 (5.4)8 (5.3) Coordinator7 (4.6)6 (5.5) Monitor8 (4.2)7 (5.34)

54 Quinn’s 8 Roles of a Manager Director – shows leadership by creating and getting others to buy into a vision about why the organization exists, setting goals to accomplish its vision, and organizing its resources to get all that needs to be done. Producer – shows he or she is personally productive, self motivated to perform, and committed to creating a work environment that is productive for self and employees. Broker – shows his or her social skills and ability to present and negotiate buy in with both employees and other parts of the organization to accomplish goals and implement ideas. Innovator - shows he or she can lead change. Here the manager envisions change and shows a focus on better ways of doing things to successfully adapt and respond to the dynamics of the external environment. In playing this role, the manager encourages employee creativity and innovation, accepts need for and successfully manages change and transitions.

55 Quinn’s 8 Roles of a Manager Mentor – shows he or she is caring and sympathetic while being helpful, considerate, sensitive, open, approachable, and fair to others. This manager communicates to employees that they are important resources that deserved to be understood, heard, valued, and developed. Facilitator – shows he or she understands the importance of teams and knows how to build the proper dynamics in a work group that facilities teams working well. Knows how to balance the task (what the team has to do) and group maintenance (how the groups will do it) roles. Monitor – oversees or supervises the people and the processes that help them perform effectively. Coordinator – decides how to plan and organize the work relationships of employees, work groups, or organizational units to make sure the work flows smoothly and that activities are carried out with minimal friction. It is getting the right people in the right place at the right time with the right resources to get the job done effectively.

56 …preparing for the Ugly! Who are your industry partners ?

57 …preparing for the Ugly! Who are your industry partners ? If you asked your industry partners what they think of CVBs what do you think they would say?

58 …preparing for the Ugly! Who are your industry partners ? If you asked your industry partners what they think of CVBs, what would they would say? If you asked them to tell you what your value added is to them, what would they say?

59 …preparing for the Ugly! Who are your industry partners ? If you asked your industry partners what they think of CVBs, what would they say? If you asked them to tell you what your value added is to them, what would they say? How do you validate what your value added is to them?

60 The Ugly: A Hotel Sales Executive Speaks “ that because they are paying very substantial dues. When you’re paying that kind of money you want to know that it’s going to something that helps you. You want a return.” “CVBs are not very helpful. If you listen to our GMs they will often express frustration about how the accountability of CVBs is not where it needs to be. They feel they can say that because they are paying very substantial dues. When you’re paying that kind of money you want to know that it’s going to something that helps you. You want a return.”

61 The Ugly: A Hotel Sales Executive Speaks “CVBs are only good for city wides. I think their primary role is to sell the city wide business into the convention center. Whether it’s the bureau or the convention center doesn’t make any difference. I’ve seen unbelievable duplication of sales efforts, and that is bad. I’ve seen the bureau and the convention center assign people to handle the big accounts. It seems that everyone wants to chase the big conventions. We hoteliers don’t need more big conventions; we need more conventions to fill up more dates. We need to have business while big shows are tearing down and setting up as those are death for hotels.”

62 The Ugly: A Hotel Sales Executive Speaks “They do not have the technology to keep up with my needs.”

63 The Ugly: A Hotel Sales Executive Speaks “We would prefer to refer to a destination’s marketing information rather than create it. One of the first questions I ask a CVB when I visit to see how the hotels are doing is, “Who’s handling your online marketing?” Too often the answer I get is ‘No one.’ Right now many of us in the hotel industry feel that we have to sell the destination as well as our hotels.”

64 The Ugly: A Hotel Sales Executive Speaks “CVBs need to demonstrate their value- added to the industry they serve.”

65 The Ugly: A Hotel Executive Speaks “CVBs need to find a better answer to their funding needs than what they are doing today. Losing the bed tax is a very real possibility. This is a tough time to be a bureau executive. The first one that truly reinvents himself will be very successful. If they keep on going the way they are now going, obsolescence is down the road. No one is going to pay the kind of money that is now being paid in dues just for PR. There must be a return that can be shown.”

66 More ugly stuff Who are your customers?

67 More ugly stuff Who are your customers? If you asked your customers what they think of CVBs, what would they say?

68 More ugly stuff Who are your customers? If you asked your customers what they think of CVBs what would they say? If you asked them to tell you what your value added is to them, what would they say?

69 More ugly stuff Who are your customers? If you asked your customers what they think of CVBs, what would they say? If you asked them to tell you what your value added is to them, what would they say? How do you validate what your value added is to them?

70 The Ugly: A National Meeting Planner Speaks “CVBs are inconsistent and I can’t count on them.” “CVBs are inconsistent and I can’t count on them.”

71 The Ugly: A National Meeting Planner Speaks “All meeting planners are doing more with less. If a bureau isn’t helping them, they won’t use them.”

72 The Ugly: A National Meeting Planner Speaks “If I can get what I need from 3 rd party intermediaries, then I don’t need a CVB.”

73 Still more ugly stuff Who are your other stakeholders?

74 Still more ugly stuff Who are your other stakeholders? If you asked your other stakeholders what they think of CVBs, what would they say?

75 Still more ugly stuff Who are your other stakeholders? If you asked your other stakeholders what they think of CVBs, what would they say? If you asked them to tell you what your value added is to them, what would they say?

76 Still more ugly stuff Who are your other stakeholders? If you asked your other stakeholders what they think of CVBs, what would they say? If you asked them to tell you what your value added is to them, what would they say? How do you validate what your value added is to them?

77 Beware. It could really get ugly If the hoteliers and meeting planners don’t see our value, how do we ever convince other stakeholders (funders) of our value? If we lose support, it gets uglier. Remember: Your funders are looking for money and guess where they are looking? Others may offer competing models for at least some of what you do

78 What Can We Do? What action steps do you take to respond to the comments of your members, customers, and community? How do we grow our friends and know our foes? National? State? Local?

79 Bill and Bob’s Ideas From our debate, (AND FOR YOUR DEBATE) we have several thoughts to share

80 Possible Optional Models for Future 1.Outsource/RFP 2.Franchise * National Consolidation Approach – Private * National Network Approach – Co-op 3.Leisure Traveler Only 4.Status Quo

81 Suggested Actions to Consider and Discuss A collaborative approach to achieve integrated action At the international association level At the state and regional association level At the local CVB level

82 National Level Action Steps - Hotels Organize an ongoing, two-way discussion with the national hotel sales community to include collaboration with state/regional associations and local CVBs.

83 National Level Action Steps: Meeting planners Survey customers – do we know what they really want or think? Develop among ALL CVBs an understanding of the benefits from collaboration. Implement industry-wide promotion of CVBs aimed at meeting professionals. Study impact of intermediaries and other threats to current business model to create proactive strategies.

84 National Level Action Steps – Travel & Tourism Expand collaboration and efforts with TIA’s National lobbying efforts to promote tourism funding Promote DMAI Web Portal that includes all CVBs (and/or coordinate with TIA and/or Implement industry-wide promotion of CVBs aimed at tourism professionals. Create ROI tourism metric for CVBs Initiate discussions with State Travel Directors to explore collaborations

85 National Level Action Steps - Other stakeholders Strengthen communications with National League of Cities/National Association of Counties/Council of Mayors Collaborate with TIA and others to promote community awareness of tourism/CVB value Explore liaison with National Economic Development Council

86 State/Regional Level Action Steps: Promote collective action at both national and regional levels (e.g. invite hotels and other stakeholders to speak at annual meetings; be part of DMAI discussions initiative) Collect & Share data on state/regional customers that could be used for promotional efforts in collaboration with DMAI

87 Local CVB Action steps: Hotel Stakeholders Participate in national DMAI hotel/CVB discussions – (DMAI webinars or ?) Initiate a two-way communication process to promote mutual understanding with local hoteliers. (Periodically survey hoteliers to ask what they want and need from you. You may find out less is more!)

88 Local CVB Action Steps: Meeting Planners Commit to performance standards and enforce them internally: no bureau is better than the worst the customer deals with. We sink or swim together. Get DMAP Accreditation

89 Local CVB Action Steps: Travel & Tourism Use national metrics Discuss state-wide tourism ROI models and build one acceptable to all

90 What’s the answer? Keep this discussion going Learn more about what others are considering to do that impacts us (E.G., DMAI’s Future Study). Encourage DMAI to expand its efforts to lead these collaborations at the national level

91 A Parting Thought The status quo is not sustainable. We will change or be changed!

92 Book info: Managing Destination Marketing Organizations By Robert Ford & William Peeper

93

94 Let’s Take a Twenty Minute Break

95 Diagnostic questionnaire to Identify the Friends to Grow & Foes to Know Mission Congruence 1. Degree to which the organization/group’s mission focuses on same goal as CVB’s mission. 2. Degree to which the organization/group has a role in advancing interests of the tourism industry. 3. Degree to which the organization/group has a role in advancing the economic development of the destination. 4. Degree to which the organization/group has a role in advancing the attractiveness of the destination. 5. Degree to which the organization/group has a role in promoting the destination brand.

96 Stakeholder Management Strategies by Stakeholder Category Category Number Resource Influence Mission Congruence CVB Focus 1HighSupportiveHigh 2LowSupportiveLow 3HighNeutralHigh 4LowNeutralLow 5HighCompetitiveHigh 6LowCompetitiveLow

97 Friends to Grow, Foes to Know Ability to influence allocation of critical resources 6. Degree to which the organization/group has members that are well connected to, influential community leaders. 7. Degree to which the organization/group has access to CVB funders. 8. Degree to which the organization/group has broad based community support for its activities and programs. 9. Degree to which the organization/group has power and influence over funding for the funders. 10. Degree to which the group/organization can establish supporting linkages to already existing programs and activities of the funders.

98 Identifying Friends to Grow and Foes to Know Ability to Influence Allocation of Critical Resources Mission supportive Congruence neutralconflicting direct / highSpend time and energy to nurture these allies Identify ways to move from neutral to supportive Actively seek ways to co-op and align missions. Seek win-wins. indirect / lowSpend time and help when possible Periodically monitor and track their activities and influence levels Show courtesy and consideration, spend some time in finding ways to preempt any attacks

99 How’d you SWOT? Your scores or how you “SWOTed” yourself Comparing your management style scores

100 Scoring the Role Survey Director - add #’s 3, 4, 25, 31, 35/5 = ? Producer – add #’s 13, 24, 29, 33/4 = ? Coordinator -add #’s 11, 23, 26, 36/4 = ? Monitor – add #’s 7, 8, 15, 22, 27/5 = ? Mentor – add #’s 10, 16, 18, 19, 32/5 = ? Facilitator – add #’s 9, 12, 14, 21, 30/5 = ? Innovator – add #’s 1, 5, 17, 28/4 = ? Broker – add #’s 2, 6, 20, 34/4 = ?

101 Friends to Grow and Foes to Know Any examples of how you influenced friends, deflected foes, and changed neutrals to friends?


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