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Welcome to the EXTRAORDINARY LEADER Workshop © 2012 Zenger Folkman. All rights reserved. EL50.3.16 Facilitator Name.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the EXTRAORDINARY LEADER Workshop © 2012 Zenger Folkman. All rights reserved. EL50.3.16 Facilitator Name."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the EXTRAORDINARY LEADER Workshop © 2012 Zenger Folkman. All rights reserved. EL Facilitator Name

2 © 2012 Zenger Folkman MAKING A DIFFERENCE Module 1 2

3 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Research Two years researching the impact of leadership performance and the key behaviors exceptional leaders demonstrate Data set of 200,000 evaluations on 20,000 people Contrasted the highest-performing 10% to the lowest-performing 10% The approach: Lead with the data! The result: New insights that fundamentally change the way we think about leadership development 3

4 © 2012 Zenger Folkman For a Full Report of the Research... 4

5 © 2012 Zenger Folkman To help you create a personal leadership Development Plan for becoming an Extraordinary Leader Workshop Objective Page 1-2 5

6 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Good does not equal great— and your organization needs you to be great Insight #1 6

7 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Leadership vs. Turnover Average Percent Turnover Poor Leaders Good Leaders Great Leaders Extraordinary leaders are much better at holding onto their people Insurance Company Call Center Percentage Annual Turnover 7

8 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Leadership vs. Customer Satisfaction Technology Service Provider

9 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Leadership vs. Net Income Net Income Great leaders generate much higher income ($1.2MM) $2.4MM $4.5MM Bottom 10%Middle 80% Top 10% Poor LeadersGood LeadersGreat Leaders Mortgage Bank Branches 9

10 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Employee Commitment/ Satisfaction Percentile Leadership Effectiveness Percentile Leadership Effectiveness vs. Employee Satisfaction/ Commitment 30,661 Leaders Across Multiple Industries 10 Page 1-4

11 © 2012 Zenger Folkman % of Employees Willing to Go Extra Mile Leadership Effectiveness Percentile Leadership Effectiveness vs. Going the Extra Mile 30,661 Leaders Across Multiple Industries 11

12 © 2012 Zenger Folkman What’s the Message From This Assessment? Page

13 © 2012 Zenger Folkman How’s Richard Doing Now? 13

14 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Exercise: Making a Difference In your experience, which goal do most leaders work toward: to be “good enough” to get the job done, or to be extraordinary? Which of the two has been your goal? If you could increase your leadership effectiveness from good to great, what difference would it make to your organization? If you could increase your leadership effectiveness from good to great, what difference would it make to you personally, in terms of your career opportunities and job satisfaction? Page

15 © 2012 Zenger Folkman PROFOUND STRENGTHS AND FATAL FLAWS Module 2

16 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Insight #2 16 You don’t have to be perfect to be an extraordinary leader

17 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Fixing Weaknesses! What Does Performance Improvement Mean to Most People? 17

18 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Impact of Leadership Effectiveness with No Perceived Strengths Page Number of Profound Strengths (Competencies at the 90 th percentile)

19 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Impact of One Strength on Overall Perception of Leadership Effectiveness Page Number of Profound Strengths (Competencies at the 90 th percentile)

20 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Three Strengths Raises Leadership Effectiveness to the 81 st Percentile Page 2-3 Number of Profound Strengths (Competencies at the 90 th percentile) 20

21 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Focusing Development on Weaknesses Works Well When... Leadership Competencies P O N M L K J I H G F E D C B A... People Have Fatal Flaws Strong negative data on an issue can neutralize a person’s leadership effectiveness 21

22 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Criteria for Identifying Fatal Flaws Strong negative feedback results (and/or poor performance review results) Below average capability in an area that is mission critical to your job 22 Page 2-4

23 © 2012 Zenger Folkman A Few Thoughts About Identifying Fatal Flaws Determining Fatal Flaws is an art, not a science Fatal Flaws affect a leader’s overall effectiveness, resulting in: –Performance problems –Career plateaus –Job failure –Damaged relationships Fatal Flaws overshadow other strengths or talents Page

24 © 2012 Zenger Folkman 10 Fatal Flaws that Consistently Lead to Leadership Failure 1.Not inspiring due to a lack of energy and enthusiasm 2.Accepting mediocre performance in place of excellent results 3.Lack of clear vision and direction 4.Loss of trust stemming from perceived bad judgment and poor decisions 5.Not a collaborative team player 6.Not a good role model (failure to walk the talk) 7.No self-development and learning from mistakes 8.Lacking interpersonal skills 9.Resistant to new ideas, thus did not lead change or innovate 10.Focus is on self, not the development of others Page

25 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Exercise: Best Leaders and Worst Leaders Identify a Best Leader Name 1-2 strengths Identify any weaknesses Identify impact of weaknesses on leader’s effectiveness Identify a Worst Leader Name 1 glaring weakness Identify any strengths Identify impact of strengths on leader’s effectiveness Record responses on page 2-5 Be prepared to share responses Page

26 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Perceptions of you are others’ reality Insight #3 26

27 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Trait B Trait E Trait F Trait A Trait D Trait C How people would objectively evaluate us Trait B Trait E Trait A Trait D Trait C Impression Trait F How people really evaluate us Impression Perceptions Page

28 © 2012 Zenger Folkman How Are You Perceived? Page 2-6 Trait B Trait E Trait A Trait D Trait C Impression Trait F What is Your “Trait F”? A Profound Strength? A Fatal Flaw? 28

29 © 2012 Zenger Folkman LEADERSHIP COMPETENCIES Module 3

30 © 2012 Zenger Folkman To get where you want to go, you need to know where you are Insight #4 30

31 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Leadership Tent Page

32 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Differentiating Competencies Page 3-3 Communicates Powerfully and Prolifically Inspires and Motivates Others to High Performance Builds Relationships Develops Others Collaboration and Teamwork Develops Strategic Perspective Champions Change Connects the Group to the Outside World Drives for Results Establishes Stretch Goals Takes Initiative Leading Change Focus on Results Interpersonal Skills 32 Technical/ Professional Expertise Solves Problems and Analyzes Issues Innovates Practices Self- Development Personal Capability Displays High Integrity and Honesty Character

33 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Key Points About Feedback It’s a gift Self-perceptions are not as accurate as we might think 33

34 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Self-Perceptions Not as Accurate as Others’ Perceptions Accuracy in Predicting Overall Effectiveness (as measured by 360 data) 34

35 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Key Points About Feedback It’s a gift Self-perceptions are not as accurate as we might think Look for your strengths! Honor the confidentiality 35

36 © 2012 Zenger Folkman SARA: Common Reactions to Feedback SARASARA Surprise, Shock Acceptance Rejection, Rationalization Anger, Anxiety 36

37 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Top Ten Rationalizations to Feedback My raters don’t really know me that well My job makes me act this way; I’m really not like this Some of my raters have it in for me My raters don’t understand the situation I’m in I used to be this way, but I’ve since changed This must be someone else’s report My raters didn’t understand the questions I wasn’t like this in my last job My raters are just jealous of my success I purposely picked people who didn’t like me 37

38 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Rating Scale Page Outstanding Strength 4. Strength 3. Competent 2. Needs Some Improvement 1. Needs Significant Improvement Don’t Know—Not Applicable Above average performance—performs this behavior better than others (Top Quartile) Exceptional performance—performs this behavior much better than most others (Top 10%) Performs this behavior at an average level or about as well as most others (Good Performance) Performs this behavior below average or sometimes does it poorly (Inconsistent Performance) Rarely or never performs this behavior well, or rarely or never attempts this behavior (Poor Performance) Don’t have enough information about or experience with this person to rate performance on this behavior 38

39 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Hierarchy of Information Tent Poles (5) Differentiating Competencies (16) Survey Items (54) 3 to 4 per competency 39

40 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Section 1: How to Interpret Your Feedback 40 Number Received Number Reported

41 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Your Invited Respondents 41

42 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Leadership Tent Model (Comparison of Rater Groups) 42

43 © 2012 Zenger Folkman 16 Differentiating Competencies 43

44 © 2012 Zenger Folkman 16 Differentiating Competencies with Item Details (Survey Items) 44

45 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Employee Commitment Index 45

46 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Importance Ratings 46

47 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Highest and Lowest Scored Items 47

48 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Written Comments 48

49 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Supplemental View: Leadership Tent Model 49

50 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Supplemental View: 16 Differentiating Competencies 50

51 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Supplemental View: 16 Differentiating Competencies (Differences in Perception) 51

52 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Exercise: Feedback Analysis Read your report quickly, from cover to cover, to get an overall sense of the feedback Use the detailed Step-by-Step Feedback Analysis Exercise in your workbook and analyze your data Distill your analysis into your key Strengths and Potential Fatal Flaw(s); record these in your Development Plan form Pages 3-5 to 3-10; B-19 52

53 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Richard’s Plan 1. My Strengths Solves Problems & Analyzes Issues (Personal Capability)—I anticipate problems and identify multiple solutions Drives for Results (Focus on Results)—I’m goal oriented and make things happen Takes Initiative (Focus on Results)—I continually look for ways to contribute to the organization Connects the Group to the Outside World (Leading Change)—I consistently help our organization benchmark its processes with industry best practices 2. Potential Fatal Flaw Weakness in Inspires and Motivates Others to High Performance (Interpersonal Skills) could prevent me from having a highly engaged team. 53

54 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Discussion: Key Feedback Themes Pair up with someone of your choice Take turns discussing your feedback analysis: –What are the key messages and themes from your feedback? –Any surprises? 54

55 © 2012 Zenger Folkman BUILDING ON YOUR STRENGTHS Module 4

56 © 2012 Zenger Folkman When choosing which strengths to develop, play to your passions! Insight #5 56

57 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Exercise: Extraordinary Moments Part 1 Think about a time in your professional life when you were performing at your peak—a time when you felt that you had achieved something extraordinary on the job Describe what factors were present in your work, your life, and your environment that made this such an extraordinary experience Part 2 In your assigned group, share this extraordinary experience (briefly) and list the factors that made it possible Page

58 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Three Fundamental Elements 58 Work Environment

59 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Variation #1 59 Work Environment

60 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Variation #2 Novice 60 Work Environment

61 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Variation #3 Chore 61 Work Environment

62 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Power of Convergence Page 4-4 Leadership Sweet Spot 62 Work Environment

63 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Identifying Your Passion and Organizational Needs Answer the questions regarding your Passion and Organizational Needs Look for overlap between these two important areas Record how these dovetail together in the box on your plan labeled “Passion and Organizational Needs” Page

64 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Richard’s Plan 3. Passion & Organizational Needs My greatest passion and opportunities lie with my ability to benchmark industry best practices and formulate plans and goals that will help us move forward as an organization in challenging market conditions. I love looking forward, setting goals, and then delivering results. Assembling the right teams and resources is critical to this effort, and I enjoy developing team members and stretching them to both produce and grow. 64

65 © 2012 Zenger Folkman XXX X X X X X X X XX XXXXXX NOVICE SWEET SPOTS Prioritizing Areas to Develop Page

66 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Three Different Approaches Page 4-7 Select the Fatal FlawBuild a Strength Balance Your Tent 66

67 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Exercise: Prioritizing Areas to Develop 1.Do you have a Fatal Flaw? If so, it should be given a priority. 2.Complete the CPO grid and identify “sweet spots” on which to focus. 3.Eliminate any that are already at the 90th percentile. 4.Identify any “Novice” competencies (where Passion and Organizational Needs align). 5.Record 2 to 3 areas for development in your plan. 6.Rank these in terms of relevance and importance. 7.Select one competency as your first priority. Pages 4-6 to

68 © 2012 Zenger Folkman 4. Competencies to Strengthen Drives for Results (Sweet Spot)—#1 Connects the Group to the Outside World (Sweet Spot)—#2 Develops Strategic Perspective (Novice Competency)—#3 5. Developmental Priority Drives for Results Richard’s Plan 68

69 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Discussion: Selecting a Developmental Focus Return to your previous partner Take turns sharing your #1 developmental priority Partners, make sure that the speaker has selected a competency that: –Is a current or potential Fatal Flaw –Aligns with Passion and Organizational Needs –Helps to “balance” the overall Leadership Tent if he/she is an Extraordinary Leader 69

70 © 2012 Zenger Folkman LEADERSHIP CROSS-TRAINING Module 5

71 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Insight #6 71 When building on strengths, often the best approach is to build around them

72 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Researchers Studied the Relationship Between Two Competencies Page 5-3 (A) Builds Relationships (A) Builds Relationships (B) Drives for Results (B) Drives for Results 72

73 © 2012 Zenger Folkman First They Looked at “A Without B” Page 5-3 If this is a strength... but this isn’t... the probability of being an extraordinary leader: 12% (A) Builds Relationships (A) Builds Relationships (B) Drives for Results (B) Drives for Results 73

74 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Then They Looked at “B Without A” Page 5-3 If this is NOT a strength... but this IS... (A) Builds Relationships (A) Builds Relationships (B) Drives for Results (B) Drives for Results the probability of being an extraordinary leader: 14% 74

75 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Power of “A + B” Led to the Notion of “Powerful Combinations” Page 5-3 If these are BOTH strengths... the probability of being an extraordinary leader: 14% + 12% 26% 72%! (A) Builds Relationships (A) Builds Relationships (B) Drives for Results (B) Drives for Results 75

76 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Researchers Studied the Relationship Between Two Competencies Page 5-3 (A) Technical Expertise (A) Technical Expertise (B) Relationship Building Skills (B) Relationship Building Skills 76 Study based on 35,210 Leaders

77 © 2012 Zenger Folkman First They Looked at “A Without B” Page 5-3 If this is a strength... but this isn’t... the probability of being an extraordinary leader: 11% (A) Technical Expertise (A) Technical Expertise (B) Relationship Building Skills (B) Relationship Building Skills 77

78 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Then They Looked at “B Without A” Page 5-3 If this is NOT a strength... but this IS... (A) Technical Expertise (A) Technical Expertise (B) Relationship Building Skills (B) Relationship Building Skills the probability of being an extraordinary leader: 13% 78

79 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Power of “A + B” Led to the Notion of “Powerful Combinations” Page 5-3 If these are BOTH strengths... the probability of being an extraordinary leader: 13% +11% 24% 73%! (A) Technical Expertise (A) Technical Expertise (B) Relationship Building Skills (B) Relationship Building Skills 79

80 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Each Competency Has Many Companion Competencies 80 ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Displays High Integrity and Honesty

81 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The “Cross-Training” Behaviors May Be Surprising Assertiveness 81 ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Displays High Integrity and Honesty

82 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Read the case study on Jane Larson in your workbook Be prepared to answer the questions at the end of the case Case Study: Jane Larson Page

83 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Competency Companions: “Cross-Training” Ideas for Leaders Page 5-5 Solves Problems and Analyzes Issues Honesty and Integrity Can Be Trusted to Act in the Team’s Best Interest Can Be Trusted to Act in the Team’s Best Interest Relationship Building and Networking Relationship Building and Networking Communicates Powerfully Takes Initiative Takes Initiative Develops Others Develops Others Desires to Pursue Excellence Desires to Pursue Excellence 83 Technical/ Professional Expertise Technical/ Professional Expertise

84 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Identifying Competency Companions to Leverage Strengths Look up your chosen Competency in the “Competency Companion Development Guide” in the Appendix Read through the sections pertaining to your Competency: –Behaviors Defining This Competency –Developmental Suggestions –Competency Companions and the accompanying text for each Identify 1 to 2 Competency Companions that will provide you with the greatest leverage for growing your chosen strength Write these down in the “Competency Companions” box of your Development Plan If you are working on a Fatal Flaw, identify Developmental Suggestions that will help you best improve this area 84

85 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Richard’s Plan Competency Companions For Drives for Results: Effective Feedback and Development—I know that I often move so fast that I probably don’t take the time to loop back with my team and let them know what is happening, what is changing, and how we are doing against our goals Innovates—I want to get more input and more ideas from my team members, and truly promote more innovative ways of making the work happen

86 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Discussion: Identifying Competency Companions Return to your previous partner Take turns sharing your chosen Competency Companions –Explain what you chose and why –Partners, make sure that the logic makes sense! 86

87 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Change Requires Practice Frequently, people underestimate the difficulty of some behavioral changes A key to developing a new skill is finding a way to practice prior to getting in the game Page

88 © 2012 Zenger Folkman 15 minutes Brainstorming activity (don’t evaluate) Gather as many ideas as possible—1 from everyone If working on a Fatal Flaw, brainstorm directly on the competency If building a strength, brainstorm on the companion behaviors Record the ideas on your Development Plan Exercise: Ideas for Development Page

89 © 2012 Zenger Folkman 7. Ideas for Development For Effective Feedback and Development: Create a visual “target” for the group to aim toward; post in public area Carve time out of each 1:1 with directs to focus on feedback Ask for feedback on my performance at least 1x per quarter Create a customer service survey to send to key stakeholders; find out how we are doing annually Share the responsibility of providing feedback; create a website or blog for anyone to provide input Invite customers to monthly team meetings to share their perspective Have weekly conversations with each team member about progress Richard’s Plan 89

90 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Richard’s Plan 8. Turning Ideas Into Action My development goal: Create a regular, ongoing system for receiving and giving feedback. Specific actions I will take: Share this goal with team members next week; invite them to create a customer survey to send out; enroll them in a two-way feedback discussion during every 1:1 meeting; quarterly check progress Date by which I will complete the goal: 4 months from now Ways to keep my focus on this goal: In recurring calendar appointments, include “feedback” as an agenda item; schedule this into Outlook tasks; build in quarterly review points now Potential barriers/obstacles: Resistance to hearing feedback from others; feedback “fatigue” Ways to overcome: Reminding self that feedback is just information; track progress made from additional feedback: employee commitment and results Support/resources I may need: Team buy-in, time 90

91 © 2012 Zenger Folkman PEER COACHING AND WORKSHOP SUMMARY Module 6

92 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The more people you involve in your development, the greater the likelihood of improvement Insight #7 92

93 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Role of the Coach Listen Ask clarifying and expanding questions, such as: –Why do you want to work on this particular competency? –Are you enthusiastic about your plan? –How will you achieve your plan of action? What support do you need? –What obstacles will you face? How can you overcome or minimize them? –What’s the first step you will take? When? –(More questions are included in your participant materials) Offer your honest perspective; be supportive Page

94 © 2012 Zenger Folkman The Role of the Coachee Provide a brief context Describe how your coach can be most helpful Discuss your Development Plan, section by section –Explain why you chose to work on this competency –Describe your Competency Companions and action plans –Invite feedback regarding your goal and plans Make changes to your plan, based on your coach’s suggestions and feedback Page

95 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Working with your partner, agree on a follow-up discussion: –Within 3 weeks of today –Share your key actions to accomplish before that time Schedule this conversation At that meeting, schedule your next follow-up discussion Building Accountability 95

96 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Follow-up Key to Change 96

97 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Adapted from: Outstanding Performers: Created, Not Born? New Results on Nature vs. Nurture, David Shanks, Science Spectra, 1999 Innate talent? Natural gift? Study of pianists and violinists in their early 20s at Music Academy of West Berlin, Germany Segmented into 3 groups—most, next most, least exceptional Differentiator expected to be innate gift for music Surprise finding: best musicians simply practiced more Estimates showed roughly 10,000 / 8,000 / 5,000 hours accumulated practice within segmented groups Mozart, Child Prodigy—Born or Made? 97

98 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Percentage of respondents surveyed Decline None Improvement Consistent or Periodic Follow-UpNo Follow-Up Perceived Change in Leadership Effectiveness Goldsmith/Morgan study on the impact of follow-up, 3 to 6 months after Leadership Development programs (11,480 managers) Importance of Feedback and Follow-up 98

99 © 2012 Zenger Folkman AP/M is a web-based application It allows you to enter and manage your goals AP/M will periodically send you reminders ActionPlan Mapper™ Helps You Successfully Follow-up 99

100 © 2012 Zenger Folkman ActionPlan Mapper™ It’s quick and easy to enter your action plans and goals 100

101 © 2012 Zenger Folkman You’ll report goal progress by filling out a brief questionnaire ActionPlan Mapper™ 101

102 © 2012 Zenger Folkman To help you create a personal leadership Development Plan for becoming an Extraordinary Leader Workshop Objective Page

103 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Next Steps 1.Close the loop by thanking your respondents for their time and feedback Pages 6-3 and

104 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Next Steps 1.Close the loop by thanking your respondents for their time and feedback –“Thank you for taking time to respond.” –“I learned a lot from the feedback, including _______.” –“Here’s an area I’ve decided to strengthen: _________.” –“These are the actions that I will be taking to improve my effectiveness: ______.” –“Please, if there’s any additional information that would help me, don’t hesitate to share it.” –“Thanks again for your time and your candor.” Page

105 © 2012 Zenger Folkman Next Steps 1.Close the loop by thanking your respondents for their time and feedback 2.Refine your Development Plan 3.Hold a discussion with your manager about your Development Plan 4.Share your feedback and Development Plan with peers and direct reports; enlist their help in leveraging your strengths 5.Work with a coach to assist with building and implementing your Development Plan and help with your ongoing leadership development 6.Revisit your plan and assess progress and business impact periodically 7.Re-assess in a year to 18 months, to chart your progress Page

106 © 2012 Zenger Folkman A Final Thought “The quality of leadership, more than any other single factor, determines the success or failure of an organization.” —Fred Fiedler and Martin Chemers in Improving Leadership Effectiveness 106

107 Thank you for Participating Zenger Folkman


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