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Art as A Means to Make Meaning: Art Lessons for the Elementary Level Deanna Price November 25 th 2014 Final Proposal ARE6540.

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Presentation on theme: "Art as A Means to Make Meaning: Art Lessons for the Elementary Level Deanna Price November 25 th 2014 Final Proposal ARE6540."— Presentation transcript:

1 Art as A Means to Make Meaning: Art Lessons for the Elementary Level Deanna Price November 25 th 2014 Final Proposal ARE6540

2 Conclusion What I learned from the work I compiled Prior to taking this course and completing this curriculum project, I was teaching the way I was taught: Producing a work of art and having students mimic my example. However, after taking this class, I have an entirely different perspective and philosophy on what a quality art curriculum should look like. From the work I compiled, I learned that the goal of an art teacher shouldn’t be to have students necessarily reproduce masterpieces every time they create a work of art. The objective should be to take students through a journey that teaches them how to not only use the skills in art, but know how to make meaningful works of art by using the skills they have learned.

3 Conclusions Implications for teaching, learning, and curriculum I have started to change my curriculum since taking this course (more focus on meaning making and contemporary art). I’ve realized many art teachers are still using school art and I don’t know that they even realize it or know what the term “school art” refers to. Quality curriculum= using contemporary art, not worrying so much about the product and focusing more on the processes taken to get to the product, and having students make meaning. These lessons can serve as a starting point to make more meaningful art lessons that incorporate contemporary art and media critiques.

4 Introduction Art curriculum in several public schools continues to bear the merely meaningless style of school art. Art classes in many public schools are still viewed as an opportunity to play and take a break. In order for art education to be taken more seriously, the curriculum needs to become more valuable and worthwhile.

5 Do Ho Suh

6 Do-Ho Suh, Seoul Home/ L.A. Home, New York Home, 2000

7 Do-Ho Suh, The Perfect Home II, 2003

8 Do-Ho Suh, Reflection, 2007

9 Do-Ho Suh, Doormat: Welcome (Pink), 2000

10 Do- Ho Suh, Floor; det., 1962-1997-2000

11 Do-Ho Suh, 348 W. 22 nd St., 1962-2000

12 Biography Do Ho Suh was born in Seoul, Korea in 1962 Received his Bachelor’s Degree in Fine art and Master’s Degree in Fine Art in Oriental Painting from Seoul National University. He was in the military as well. Moved to New York to finish school. Critique “The translucent organza-like polyester highlights in brilliant colour the 'invisible memory' of our daily experiences at home. Suh chose the fabric, a variety once used in traditional Korean summer wear, 'because it was cheap and readily available, and I didn't want to give too much value to the fabric itself', (Shaw, 2013). ”

13 Why the artist was selected After reading about the meaning behind Suh’s work, I felt that students would be able to create a diverse body of work. Suh’s work can give students the opportunity to dig deep from within to bring a memory back to life through art.

14 Student Work Significance

15 Student Work

16 JeongMee Yun

17 JeongMee Yoong, The Color Project- Lola and Her Yellow Things, 2006

18 JeongMee Yoong, The Pink and Blue Project- Jake and His Blue Things, 2005- Ongoing

19 JeongMee Yoong, The Pink Project- SeoWoo and Her Pink Things, 2006

20 JeongMee Yoong, The Color Project- Steve and his Red Things, 2006

21 JeongMee Yoong, The Pink Project- Tess and Her Pink Things, 2006

22 JeongMee Yoong, The Blue Project- Woojea and His Blue Things, 2007

23 Biography From South Korea Inspiration from her work comes from,“Her five- year-old daughter couldn't get enough candy- colored possessions. She photographed her daughter Seowoo amongst her sea of pink things, from dolls to dresses to stuffed animals. She then began photographing little boys and girls amongst their color-coded belongings in a quest to better understand how gender shapes our lives from such a young age,” (Huffington Post [HP], 2012).

24 Critique Yun’s work sparks a keen awareness to the role gender plays in our society. In her work, young girls are surrounded by domestic items and hot pink, while the boys are accompanied with science, weapons, and violence with various blues (HP, 2012).

25 Why the Artist Was Selected I feel that the students in elementary school can really relate to her images. Focuses on girls having pink toys and boys having blue toys. Will force students to be introspective about the toys they have and want.

26 Significance The art lesson would be for 4 th grade students. Students would view work by Yun and be required to critique it using Feldman’s Method. Following this, students would be required to generate how the influence of gender identity in our society has influenced their decisions and interests. Students would make their comments and statements using a bubble map. Students will take everything they have written and think of images that could represent their statements. Students would draw their images first then create a monochromatic painting. Once students complete their art, they would write an artist statement explaining how the work they made is significant to them. A rubric would be used to assess their work and performance.

27 Bubble Map How gender stereotypes in society have influenced me

28 Eleanor Antin

29 Eleanor Antin, Adventures of a Nurse videotape, 1976

30 Eleanor Antin, King of Solana Beach: Performance, 1973

31 Eleanor Antin, King of Solana Beach Performance, 1973

32 Eleanor Antin, 100 Boots on Vacation, 1971-73

33 Eleanor Antin, Judgement of Paris (after Rubens) — Light Helen, 2007

34 Eleanor Antin, California Lives: Merrit, 1969, replication 1998

35 Biography Eleanor Antin was born in New York City in 1935. Her parents were Polish Jews who immigrated to the United States just before Antin was born. She went to Music and Art Highschool in the Bronx and it was there that she met her husband, David Antin, who was a poet. Eleanor Antin is a performance artist, filmmaker, and installation artist (Wikipedia, 2014).

36 Critique Antin’s work is a reflection of her culture and heritage as well as myriad other cultures. “Antin delves into history—whether of ancient Rome, the Crimean War, the salons of nineteenth- century Europe, or her own Jewish heritage and Yiddish culture—as a way to explore the present. Antin is a cultural chameleon, masquerading in theatrical or stage roles to expose her many selves,” (PBS, 2014).

37 Why the artist was selected I feel that her work could set the stage for students to contemplate where their family originated from and how their culture influences their life style on a daily basis. Moreover, Eleanor Antin works with various art mediums that students may find quite unusual (such as making a movie and performing), which could open several doors for students to choose from to create their own works of art.

38 Significance Students would work in groups of four to discuss their culture, where they are from, and where their families are from. Students would be instructed to identify the ways in which culture influences personal growth, development, and roles in society. Following this, students would create a 1 minute performance that incorporates all of their cultures. Each student would have a different role for the performance: 1.) Director 2.) Person who writes the script 3.) Artist, and 4.) The narrator. Once students finish, each group would perform in front of the class. I would use my digital camera to take stills from each performance, just like Eleanor Antin did. Pictures from the performance would then be turned a story line that describes their one minute performance, what it’s about, and how each group views cultures and the way it influences individuals and our society. Students would be graded using the Art Rubric.

39 Collier Schorr

40 Collier Schorr, Forests and Fields, Unknown

41 Collier Schorr, Forests and Fields (3), Unknown

42 Collier Schorr, Forests and Fields (2), Unknown

43 Collier Schorr, Forests and Fields (4), Unknown

44 Collier Schorr, Two Shirts, 1998

45 Collier Schorr, American Flag with Scratch, 1999-2000

46 Biography Collier Schorr was born in New York in 1963. She studied art at the School of Visual Arts in Queens, New York. She has been represented by over 303 gallery’s in New York since 1990 and won the Berlin Prize (Wikipedia, 2014). She is best known for her portraits of adolescent men and women.

47 Critique “Best known for her portraits of adolescent men and women, Schorr’s pictures often blend photographic realism with elements of fiction and youthful fantasy,” (PBS, 2014).

48 Why I selected this artist I selected this artist because I want to introduce students to traditional photography. Today, taking a picture is simple; all you have to do is snap a picture and it appears immediately on a screen. However, there is an art to taking photographs and that art has been lost in our digital age. I want to use Schorr’s work as an introduction to photography and proceed to teach students about how only a few years ago, in order to get pictures, you had to buy film, load the film in the camera, take the pictures, then take the film to the store and wait for a few days for an employee to develop the film before picking them up.

49 Significance Students would view the works in my presentation by Schorr and we would use her work to begin a discussion on photography, where it came from, and what it entails. Following this, students would be instructed to create a self-portrait that captures something about their identity similar to what Schorr’s work illustrates. Following this, in the background of their self-portrait, students would be required to come up with two additional images: One that portrays traditional photography and one that portrays modern photography. The entirety of this piece would serve as a biographical narrative and an expression of their view of traditional and modern photography.

50 Media Critique- Toy Marketing Based on Gender Stereotypes Towards Girls Paul Windle, The New York Times: For an article about gender specific toys, 2012

51 Untitled 1, 2013 “Detrimental: Child psychologists agree the stereotyping of toys is encouraging girls to think it's only their appearance that matters.” Read more: http://www.dailymail.c o.uk/femail/article- 2338976/Too-pink-How-toys- alarmingly-gender- stereotyped-Seventies--cost- little-girls-self- esteem.html#ixzz3GXw5zAxv

52 “Avalanche of pink: A comparison by campaign group Let Toys Be Toys shows how in the Seventies, left, toys were in a variety of colors while today girls are pushed to embrace one shade.” Read more: http://www.dailymai l.co.uk/femail/article- 2338976/Too-pink-How- toys-alarmingly-gender- stereotyped-Seventies-- cost-little-girls-self- esteem.html#ixzz3GXwaw Qmj Untitled 2, 2013

53 “Boys are encouraged to play with mechanical toys and science kits while for girls it's all about dolls.” Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2338976/Too-pink-How- toys-alarmingly-gender-stereotyped-Seventies--cost-little-girls-self- esteem.html#ixzz3GXx6AXMX Untitled 3, 2013Untitled 4, 2013

54 “Strawberry Shortcake: The modern day version, right, has a slimmer figure, longer hair, bigger eyes and a smaller nose.” Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2338976/Too-pink-How-toys-alarmingly-gender-stereotyped- Seventies--cost-little-girls-self-esteem.html#ixzz3GXxpPt2l Untitled 5, 2013 Untitled 6, 2013

55 Critique You’re walking through a store towards the toy aisle and, alas! There it is! The brightly colored blue aisles separated by the illuminating pink aisles. What do these colors resemble? Boy toys and girl toys. Are marketing strategies geared towards conditioning girls to be a certain way (domesticated, proper, and elegant) and boys to be another (big, strong, and intelligent)? The images in the article, “Too Much Pink! How Toys Have Become Alarmingly Gender Stereotype Since the Seventies… At the Cost of Little Girls’ Self Esteem” published by the Daily Mail reveal gender stereotypes encouraged by toy products. In the 1970’s, toy marketing was entirely different; all toys had various colors so girls might have been buying science kits and boys while boys were purchasing play washing machines. However, now everything is color coded and it can’t be certain that public consumers realize the startling difference in toy production from the past to the present.

56 Why I selected these images I selected these images because I want to challenge my students by having them question the items they are interested in and find themselves desiring to purchase. It would be so interesting to display one of these images and have my students critique it. I am interested in seeing if they can figure out the dilemma with modern toys all on their own.

57 Significance Students would view two different images: One would be of a comparison of toys from the 1970s and the other would be of a toy aisle today. Students would use a Double Bubble Map to compare and contrast these two images. Following this, students would create a Frame of Reference to write a statement about what they think the overall message of these images conveys.

58 Double Bubble Map Toys from 1970s Toys from Today I believe the overall message of these images conveys…

59 Significance (continued) Next, students will be asked to think of their favorite toy and illustrate it to the best of their ability to make it look realistic. After students draw their favorite toy, students will color it with color pencil. Afterwards, students will look at their double bubble maps, statement, and their illustration all at once. We will discuss what all of them have in common. At the end of the lesson, we will talk about how toys today are geared towards gender stereotypes and students will be asked to look at the toy they illustrated to see if they believe it is an example of a gender stereotype.

60 World War II Posters

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66

67 Critique Many posters from WWII served as propaganda. “Persuading the American public became a wartime industry, almost as important as the manufacturing of bullets and planes. The Government launched an aggressive propaganda campaign to galvanize public support, and some of the nation's foremost intellectuals, artists, and film makers became warriors on that front,” (National Archives).

68 Why this work was selected I selected this work because I think advertising for war during WWII and advertising for war today is entirely different. I want students to look at WWII posters and todays advertisements, consider the various tactics that are used to try and get individuals to recruit, and understand how advertising was different and similar then compared to now.

69 Significance Before telling students what the WWII posters are, I would select one of the posters and have students do an art critique using Feldman’s Method. Following this, we would begin a discussion about WWII posters and how they compare to the advertising for war today. Following this, students would be instructed to create their own poster that either, 1.) Shows support for war or 2.) Does not show support for war. Students will have to come up with reasons that they are for or against war. Once all students finish, their posters will be hung up and as a class, we will have a discussion about whether or not the posters are convincing of their opinion and how their posters could affect our communities view on war.

70 Method of Assessment All students, grades K-5, would be assessed using a rubric I created. Students would be graded on three criteria: Behavior (50% of their grade), Effort (25% of their grade), and Assignments (25% of their grade). Behavior is worth the most because at the school I currently teach at, I feel that there are quite a few students who exhibit behavior problems. In my opinion, if I can help students regulate their behavior with rules, consequences, and procedures, eventually, most or all of the behavior problems will diminish. When behavior problems cease to exist, inevitably, the Effort and Assignment grade should be at a passing or exceptional rate. I feel that classroom management is the key to success and if rules procedures, and consequences are established and consistent, most students will be successful in the art class room most of the time.

71 Art Rubric O (Outstanding)S (Satisfactory)N (Needs Improvement)U (Unsatisfactory) Behavior (50%) Student follows all of the rules and procedures for the art room at all times. Student follows most of the rules and procedures for the art room. Student may have received a warning, time out, or had to complete a think it through sheet. Student has difficulty following all of the art room rules and procedures. Student may have received an Oops in Art Card or had to have had some sort of parental contact due to behavior problems. Student does not follow most of the art room rules and procedures. Student may have received a referral. Effort (25%) Student always has outstanding effort, tries their best on all work and is always focused in class. Student displays good effort and is usually focused in class. Student is frequently distracted and not using and does not complete their work in a mannerly time. Student is not completing their work to their full potential. Assignments (25%)Student displays excellent craftsmanship and creativity in all of their work. Student displays good craftsmanship and creativity in their work. Student rushes to get their art work finished. Student is not completing their work.

72 References

73 Anderson, T., & Milbrandt, M. (1998). Authentic instruction in art: Why and how to dump the school style. Visual Arts Research, 24(1), 13-20. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.net.ucf.edu/stable/20715931 Antin, E. (1976). Adventures from a nurse videotape. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://www.artnet.com/Magazine/news/warrobinson/Images/warrobinson5-5-30.jpg Antin, E. (1969, replication 1998). California Lives: Merrit. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Antin, E. (1973). King of Solana Beach: Performance. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Antin, E. (1973). King of Solana Beach Performance. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Antin, E. (2007). Judgement of Paris (after Rubens) — Light Helen. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from http://www.art21.org/images/eleanor-antin/judgement-of-paris-after-rubens-light-helen- 2007?slideshow=1 Antin, E. (1971-73). 100 Boots on Vacation. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Genreal Electric Company. (1942). Are you doing all you can? Retrieved November 3 rd, 2013 from www.artstor.org GUDE, O.,. (2013). New school art styles: The project of art education. Art Education, 66(1), 6-15. Huffington Post. (2012, April 17). JeongMee Yoon explores color and gender in “Pink and Blue.” Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/17/jeongmee- yoon_n_1432203.html National Archives (2014). Teaching With Documents: Powers of Persuasion - Poster Art of World War II. Retrieved from http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/wwii-posters/ The Public Broad Casting Service, Art 21. (2014). Eleanor Antin. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/eleanor-antin The Public Broad Casting Service, Art 21. (2014). Collier Schorr. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/collier-schorr The Public Broadcasting Service, Art 21 (2014). Do Ho Suh. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/do-ho-suh

74 Schorr, C. (Unknown). Forests and Fields. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://coincidences.typepad.com/still_images_and_moving_o/ 2004/02/emerging_photog.html Schorr, C. (Unknown) Forests and Fields (2). Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 http://www.vincentborrelli.com/vbb/images/items/400x20000/101946b.jpg Schorr, C. (Unknown) Forests and Fields (3). Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://slamxhype.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/stussy-deluxe-spring-summer-2011- collection-collier-schorr-2.jpg Schorr, C. (Unknown) Forests and Fields (4). Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://www.art21.org/files/images/schorr-photo3-003.jpg Schorr, C. (1998) Two Shirts. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 http://www.art21.org/images/collier- schorr/two-shirts-1998?slideshow=1 Schorr, C. (1999- 2000) American Flag with Scratch. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 http://www.art21.org/images/collier-schorr/america-flag-with-scratch-1999-2000?slideshow=1 Shaw, C. (2013, November 15). Sheer will: Artist Do Ho Suh’s ghostly fabric sculptures explore the meaning of home. Retrieved from http://www.wallpaper.com/art/sheer-will-artist-do-ho-suhs-ghostly- fabric-sculptures-explore-the-meaning-of-home/6960

75 Suh, D.H. (2000). Doormat: Welcome (Pink). Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Suh, D.H. (1962-1997-2000). Floor; det. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Suh, D.H. (2007). Reflection. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Suh, D.H. (2000). Seoul Home/ L.A. Home, New York Home. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Suh, D.H. (2003). The Perfect Home II. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Suh, D.H. (1962-2000). 348 W. 22 nd St. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from www.artstor.org Untitled. (2013). Untitled 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2338976/Too-pink-How-toys-alarmingly-gender- stereotyped-Seventies--cost-little-girls-self-esteem.html United States Army. (1939/45). “I serve… be an army nurse.” Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from www.artstor.org Windle, P. (2012). The New York Times: For an article about gender specific toys. Retrieved October 18 th, 2014 from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/23/opinion/sunday/gender-based-toy-marketing- returns.html?_r=0 Wikipedia (2014, November 22). Eleanor Antin. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_Antin Wikipedia (2014, November 22). Collier Schorr. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collier_Schorr World War II Poster. (Date Unknown). Do the job he left behind. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://miataffinhistory.blogspot.com/2012/12/womens-role-during-ww2.html World War II Poster. (Date unknown). She’s a wow. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://digital.lib.umn.edu/IMAGES/reference/mswp/MPW00067.jpg World War II Poster. (Date unknown). Come into the factories. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://worldwar2headquarters.com/images/posters/British/factories.jpg World War II Poster. (Date unknown). He volunteered for the submarine service. Retrieved November 3 rd, 2014 from http://www.barricksinsurance.com/WorldWar098.jpg

76 Yoon, J. (2005-present). Artworks. Retrieved November 22 nd, 2014 from http://www.jeongmeeyoon.com/artworks.htm


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