Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Student Success Programs Where Retention Theory and Practice Converge Mary Stuart Hunter Houghton Mifflin College Survival National Conference July 12,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Student Success Programs Where Retention Theory and Practice Converge Mary Stuart Hunter Houghton Mifflin College Survival National Conference July 12,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Student Success Programs Where Retention Theory and Practice Converge Mary Stuart Hunter Houghton Mifflin College Survival National Conference July 12, 2002 Atlanta, Georgia

2 What We Know About Student Retention There is widespread interest in student success Nationally, rates vary by institutional type 52.5% at public two-year institutions 83.6% at private universities Overall, retention rates have changed very little over the past 30 years

3 What We Know About Student Retention What matters most is our institution’s rate Not a goal, rather a by-product Student learning and success = student retention

4 Perspectives on Student Retention From the Institution’s Perspective From the Student’s Perspective Lessons from Astin’s I – E – O model

5 Institutional Cultures and Student Success Barriers to Student Success and Retention

6 Recruitment and Orientation Tendency to admit under-prepared students Inadequate new student orientation Inadequate pre-matriculation academic advising

7 First-Year Instruction First-Year Instruction Large first-year classes Classes taught by the least experienced instructors Infrequent testing and little feedback

8 Instruction / grading based on memorization and regurgitation Little opportunity for active learning strategies Lack of critical thinking in classes Research skills not required nor taught

9 Campus Community Little effort to create a common community Lack of student – faculty interaction outside of class

10 Little effort is made to connect the curriculum and the co-curriculum Little attention to connecting the curriculum and the co-curriculum to the institutional mission Lack of collaboration between student affairs and academic affairs

11 Student Success Courses and First-Year Seminars Ideal Settings for Addressing Institutional Challenges

12 Understanding and Applying Student Retention Theory

13 Student / Institutional Fit (Tinto) Student background and characteristics help determine their commitment education. The greater the congruence, the more likely that the student will persist.

14 Empathic Recall Exercise

15 Social and Academic Integration (Tinto, Pascarella, Terenzini) Valuable learning experiences incorporate the classroom learning with out of class learning. Students who integrate the academic and the social reap great benefits.

16 Sharing of Examples

17 Involvement / Community (Astin, Kuh, Boyer, Light) Direct link between the quality and quantity of involvement and student performance and satisfaction Positive interaction with peers brings about a sense of satisfaction and responsibility

18 Reflections on Powerful Group Experiences

19 Student Learning (Astin, Tinto, Kuh) Successful institutions create settings that educate all students Students who find support for their learning, engage in active learning, and receive frequent feedback are more likely to stay than those who don’t

20 Optimal Learning Reflection

21 Applying Theory to Student Success Courses

22 10 Tips for Success in Teaching First-Year Students (Strommer) Understand your students Clarify your objectives Attend to the first class

23 Establish a climate for learning Abandon the non-stop lecture Involve students with varied activities Provide opportunities for reflection Take risks Include upper-class students Develop a support group

24 10 Tips for Success in Teaching First-Year Seminar (Hunter) Embrace high expectations and demand quality work Learn names early and use them Demonstrate self disclosure

25 Give students ownership for some aspects of the course Involve students in teaching the course Remember that process is content Meet at least once with each student individually

26 Obtain feedback throughout the term Provide opportunity for synthesis and projection Know that teaching new student seminars if a continual work in progress

27 7 Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education (Chickering and Gamsen) Encourages contact between students and faculty Develops reciprocity and cooperation among students Encourages active learning

28 Gives prompt feedback Emphasizes time on task Communicates high expectations Respects diverse talents and ways of learning

29 A Lesson from Recycling Think Globally Act Locally

30 Stuart Hunter National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition

31


Download ppt "Student Success Programs Where Retention Theory and Practice Converge Mary Stuart Hunter Houghton Mifflin College Survival National Conference July 12,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google