Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Introduction For thousands of years red wine has been believed to have health related benefits upon consumption. In the past several decades interest in.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Introduction For thousands of years red wine has been believed to have health related benefits upon consumption. In the past several decades interest in."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction For thousands of years red wine has been believed to have health related benefits upon consumption. In the past several decades interest in regards to the potential benefits of red wine has peaked. The emerging studies are showing that, indeed, red wine may have many health benefits when consumed in moderation. Red wine contains antioxidants, such as flavonoids, which decrease the presence of harmful free radicals within the body. In addition, red wine contains an antioxidant called resveratrol that recent research shows may be a powerful combater of many illnesses and diseases. Not all wine is the same and while both red and white wines have beneficial antioxidants, red wine appears to a better choice in regards to health benefits. Abstainers of alcohol can reap similar benefits from non- alcohol alternatives. Instructions for Use All health benefits stemming from red wine are in the context of moderate consumption. Moderate drinking is defined as an average of one drink per day for women and an average of two drinks per day for men (Mayo Clinic staff, 2009). The reason behind different daily consumption recommendations for women and men has to do with body composition and alcohol metabolism differences between the sexes (Mayo Clinic staff, 2009). In the form of red wine, one drink is generally defined as 5 oz of wine, of which 10-12% is alcohol (Das, 2009). Like all foods, wine has calories that must be accounted for in one’s diet to avoid weight gain. There are approximately 120 calories in one 5 oz glass of red wine (Bauer, 2008). Wine is not for everyone. Certain medical conditions may be worsened by the consumption of wine, so it is important to consult your physician before beginning a wine regimen (Bauer, 2008). In regards to wine (and all alcohol) consumption moderation is key. The difference between moderate and excessive alcohol consumption may be the difference between preventing and actually causing disease (Karpecki, 2008). Resveratrol Resveratrol is a powerful antioxidant that is gaining notoriety for its potential disease-fighting abilities that extend to a wide variety of diseases and illnesses (California Table Grape Commission). Resveratrol is present in red wine, grapes, grape juice, berries, and nuts (Karpecki, 2008). However, red wine appears to be the best source of resveratrol as the fermentation process used to make wine allows for absorption to occur more easily (Karpecki, 2008). Amounts of resveratrol found in nuts and berries are very low and the bioavailability of grape juice is negligible (Bertelli, 2007). Resveratrol, which is found in the skin of the grape, is produced when the plant becomes stressed by weather, fungus, or other disease (Kaelble, 2009). Resveratrol protects humans because it protects plants (Kaelble, 2009). Due to its thin skin, the pinot noir grape must produced the most resveratrol to protect itself. Therefore, in grape and wine form, it is the highest in resveratrol (Kaelble, 2009). Health Benefits of Red Wine The heart – Studies have shown that regular red wine consumption is associated with a reduced incidence of mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD), increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a risk reduction of approximately 30% for myocardial infarction (MI) (Das, 2009). These cardioprotective effects are attributed to the polyphenols and resveratrol present in red wine (Das, 2009). The brain – Wine consumption has been correlated with a reduced incidence of dementia as well as fewer white brain abnormalities in the elderly population (Donaldson, 2004). The eyes – Red wine drinkers have a decreased risk for developing any type of cataract and protection against age-related macular degeneration and vision loss in the elderly (Karpecki, 2008). The arteries – The resveratrol found in red wine has been shown to prevent blood clotting and plaque formation within the arteries by altering the blood lipid profile (Bauer, 2008). Resveratrol also promotes vasorelaxation, leading to the suppression of atherosclerosis (Kraft, et al., 2009). Conclusions Moderation is essential in regards to consumption of alcoholic beverages Moderate wine drinking is defined as one 5 oz glass of wine per day for women and two 5 oz glasses of wine per day for men Consult your physician before you begin drinking wine The best food source of resveratrol is red wine Among the different grape varietals, pinot noir is found to be highest in resveratrol Moderate red wine usage has been shown to have dramatic health benefits on the heart, brain, eyes, and the arteries Red wine consumption is also shown to have beneficial effects on cancer, diabetes mellitus, as well as, other disease states Wine your way to better health: Health benefits of red wine and guidelines for consumption Erin Huckle Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Concordia College, Moorhead, MN References Bauer, J. (2008). Is wine good for you? Retrieved November 28, 2010, from Bertelli, A.A.E. (2007). Wine, research and cardiovascular disease: Instructions for use. Atherosclerosis, 195, Retrieved November 17, 2010, from Science Direct database. California Table Grape Commission. Fresh California Grape Nutrition News: Research Shows Fresh California Grapes Are Good For Your Health. [Brochure]. Das, D.K. (2009). Wine and Heart Health. Cardiology, 28, 1-5. Retrieved November 17, 2010, from Academic Search Premier database. Donaldson, I.M. (2004). Bon santé: is wine good for your health? Internal Medicine Journal, 34, Retrieved November 17, 2010, from Academic Search Premier database. Kaelble, S. (2009). Cheers to Health! In moderation, a little red wine can reap significant health benefits. The Saturday Evening Post, Retrieved November 17, 2010, from Academic Search Premier database. Karpecki, P.M. (2008). A Toast to Wine And Your Health. Review of Optometry, Retrieved November 17, 2010, from Academic Search Premier database. Kraft, T.E., Parisotto, D., Schempp, C., & Efferth, T. (2009). Fighting Cancer with Red Wine? Molecular Mechanisms of Resveratrol. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 49, Jack Times.com (2010). Resveratrol proves Red Wine healthy for Heart Attack Patients. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from Mayo Clinic staff (2009). Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart? Retrieved November 29, 2010, from Pound House Café (2010). Uncategorized. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from content/uploads/2010/05/red-white-wine-glass1.jpg Robb Carr – A Novocastrian Abroad. (2010). A distinctly American movement. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from Health Benefits (continued) Cancer – Regular wine usage improves the survival rate of individuals with colorectal cancer in comparison to infrequent wine consumption (Kraft, et al., 2009). Recently, red wine was proven to be a cancer chemopreventative agent (Karpecki, 2008). Evidence also shows that red wine consumption decreases one’s risk for developing basal cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, as well as decreasing the risks for cancers of the lungs, colon, and upper digestive tract (Karpecki, 2008). Diabetes mellitus – A lower rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus is correlated with wine consumption (Donaldson, 2004). Red Vs. White Wine * White wine does not contain resveratrol in any appreciableappreciable amount because the skins of the grape are removed before fermentation (Das, 2009). * However, recent reports indicate that white wine may contain many of the same cardioprotective antioxidants present in red wine (Das, 2009). Non-Alcoholic Alternatives De-alcoholized red wine: Red wine with the alcohol removed was found to have the same levels of resveratrol as its alcoholic counterpart (Das, 2009). Likely due to the presence of resveratrol, the same cardioprotective effects were found in the alcohol-free red wines (Das, 2009). Grapes: Resveratrol is present in the skins of all three colors of grapes (California Table Grape Commission). Grapes have also been shown to have many of the same health benefits of red wine including heart health and cancer prevention (California Table Grape Commission). In addition, grapes also have fewer calories and more dietary fiber per serving in comparison to red wine as grapes contain just 90 kcals per ¾ cup and red wine has 120 kcals per 5 oz serving (California Table Grape Commission). A structural depiction of a resveratrol molecule Remember: just 5 oz of red wine counts as one drink A comparison of the Nutrition Facts for a serving of grapes and a 5 oz glass of red wine (Cabernet Sauvignon) Other Factors While research certainly shows that red wine is beneficial to one’s health in many ways, there are other variables that could also be playing a role in the correlation between wine and health. Wine drinkers have greater IQ’s, more education, higher socio-economic status, better overall diets, more physical activity, lower BMIs, and are less likely to smoke than beer and spirit drinkers (Donaldson, 2004). The pinot noir grape. Your best wine choice! Choose red over white wine when possible to reap the additional benefits of resveratrol


Download ppt "Introduction For thousands of years red wine has been believed to have health related benefits upon consumption. In the past several decades interest in."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google