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Poetry Analysis UsingTPCASTTPoetry Analysis UsingTPCASTT Ms. Wade’s Language Arts Class.

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Presentation on theme: "Poetry Analysis UsingTPCASTTPoetry Analysis UsingTPCASTT Ms. Wade’s Language Arts Class."— Presentation transcript:

1 Poetry Analysis UsingTPCASTTPoetry Analysis UsingTPCASTT Ms. Wade’s Language Arts Class

2 Template

3 T is for TITLE Analyze the title first. What do you predict this poem will be about? Write down your predictions. We will reflect on the title again after we have read the poem. The next step is often omitted, but it is the most important!!!!

4 READ THE POEM!!!!

5 P is for PARAPHRASE Paraphrasing is putting something in your own words. After reading the poem, rewrite it in your own words. This may be three sentences or a page, depending on the particular poem.

6 C is for CONNOTATION Analyze the figures of speech and sound effects of the poem. You should have studied poetry elements already. Look at anything that is not literal in this section.. These elements add to the meaning. simile implied metaphor direct metaphor personification HYPERBOLE meter onomatopoeia RHYME alliteration ASSONANCE apostrophe diction

7 A is for ATTITUDE Tone is the attitude of the speaker toward the subject of the poem.

8 S is for SHIFT If there is a change in… Time Tone Speaker This should always be noted, as this will also affect the meaning.

9 T is for TITLE (again) At this time, you should reconsider the title. Were you right in your predictions? What other meanings might the title have in light of your analysis? Next, the biggie….

10 T is for THEME As you already know, theme is the general insight into life conveyed by the author through his/her work. It does not make a judgment. example: “Don’t do drugs” is not a theme. It merely states something that is true to life and the human condition.

11 How do I find the THEME? Look at the other parts of TPCASTT. What insight are all of these working together to convey? What is the poet trying to say about life?

12 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew.

13 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Title: The title makes me think this poem is going to be about an everyday, common man.

14 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Paraphrase: A man has lost an arm during a war. He speaks of being afraid he will only be able to do things by halves from now one. But his resolve is to work twice as hard at the things of his life, and from that decisions the man lives life more fully than most.

15 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Connotation: Words such as "halves" and "twice" are significant. And "wing" in the last line is definitely symbolic, not literal.

16 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Attitude: At the beginning, he is said to be "afraid." By the end, he may be described as resolved, determined, hopeful, inspired, etc.

17 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Shift: There is a shift from third-person narrator to first-person speaker, which seems to be the voice of the injured soldier, and then back to third person. A shift in tone also occurs at the end of the poem. The voice of fear and sense of loss shift to an attitude of resolve and a sense of enthusiasm and rebirth.

18 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Title (again): The title still maintains its sense that this is a common man; his experience is intended to be inspirational to all people who live with a tragic loss. It is this man's positive response to a life-altering challenge that makes all the difference.

19 “A Man” by Nina Cassian While fighting for his country, he lost an arm and was suddenly afraid: “From now on, I shall only be able to do things by halves. I shall reap half a harvest. I shall be able to play either the tune or the accompaniment on the piano, but never both parts together. I shall be able to bang with only one fist on doors, and worst of all I shall only be able to half hold my love close to me. There will be things I cannot do at all, applaud for example, at shows where everyone applauds.” From that moment on, he set himself to do everything with twice as much enthusiasm. And where the arm had been torn away, a wing grew. Theme: *People conquer their greatest fears by resolving to have a positive outlook. *Out of great tragedy can come a new spirit of determination and hope. *One can overcome one's greatest fears by changing one's attitude to enthusiastic self-acceptance. *Physical challenges can be overcome through a change in attitude.

20 Think back to our discussions about challenges. Now write a personal response to “Moco Limping.” Can you relate personally to the challenges faced by Moco and his owner? Why or why not? Explain using words and phrases from the poem. Notice how words and phrases from the poem are incorporated in the following example. After your TPCASTT of “Moco Limping, respond to the following writing prompt:

21 I've never had a dog that was a "brutal hunger" or even a "rickety little canine" like Moco. My dogs have all been lovable mutts who liked to chase balls and run away from me when I called them. But I can relate to the feel of his "warm fur" and his eyes that "cry out with life." My dog, Rex, looks at me with the saddest brown eyes when I leave him. But he is always eager to see me when I come home in the evening, and I love rubbing my face on his soft furry ears. So I understand the speaker's affection for his dog even though he is crippled.


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