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Control Systems for Future GSI, May 12 - 13, 2003 Control System Requirements for the CBM detector Burkhard Kolb GSI HADES.

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Presentation on theme: "Control Systems for Future GSI, May 12 - 13, 2003 Control System Requirements for the CBM detector Burkhard Kolb GSI HADES."— Presentation transcript:

1 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 Control System Requirements for the CBM detector Burkhard Kolb GSI HADES

2 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 CBM Requirements CBM is a complex detector system with more than parameters It has all the usual controls as HV, gas, power, temperature etc. Many of the FE components will be custom build and require loading of FPGA or CPLD designs

3 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 CBM Requirements FE and trigger electronics require thresholds and tuning parameters FE and trigger electronics require monitoring of status and performance. All loadable parameter sets/ design files will come from version controlled records of SQL database Access to parameters with security control

4 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 CBM Requirements Scalability –Start with detector prototypes –Run the full DCS with no loss of performance Partitioning –Independent testing of sub systems –Development in outside labs

5 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 CBM Requirements Alarm handling Interlock monitoring Archiving to SQL database

6 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 CBM Requirements No dependence on proprietary tools, protocols, hardware and software, except on custom chip and board level for front ends Long time range of operation and maintenance Interoperability with existing control systems to allow flexible inclusion of sub systems Open standards

7 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 HADES will become a part of the CBM detector and has now an EPICS control system

8 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 Geometry Six sectors form a hexagonal frustum: 2  in 2  in  18 < < 8518 < < 85 Lepton Identification RICH –Radiator: C 4 F 10 –Spherical mirror –Photon Detector: CsI photo cathode META –TOF plastic scintillators –Lead PreShower detector Tracking Superconducting toroid (6 coils) –B max = 0.7 T, –Bending power 0.34 Tm MDC (multiwire drift chamber) –Low mass design –four planes of small cell (» 1 cm) drift chamber. In total about detector channels

9 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 HADES trigger scheme *10 6 s -1 interact. rate (1 % target) LVL1 trigger : multiplicity (TOF) 10 5 s -1 o Central collision:10 5 s -1 (3 Gbyte/sec) oall detectors read out (3 Gbyte/sec) ostorage in pipeline memory (< 32 evts.) LVL2 trigger: Ring & Shower search in RICH & META 10 3 s -1 oLepton candidates:10 3 s -1 otransfer of data to next pipeline memory otrack info to 3LVL processor LVL3 trigger: MDC & LVL2 info oNot yet implemented as we can write with 40 Mbytes/s to disk

10 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 Status EPICS is installed: –EPICS base on Linux, WinNT, and MAC OS X –Some EPICS extensions MEDM (Motif editor and display manager) ALH (alarm handler) Burt (backup and restore) Channel Archiver

11 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS applications VME crate, CAMAC crate, and MDC power supply control, RICH LV control (CANbus) LeCroy 1440 HV control (CAMAC) Dubna HV control (serial) CAEN 527 HV control (VME - CAENnet) Position monitors (RASNIK + portable channel access server (CAS))

12 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS applications Gas bottle scales readout (serial) CFD control (CAMAC) Temperature sensors (via sockets) General purpose ADCs (VME) TOF laser and filter control (VME) Start detector discriminator & veto logic (VME) Accelerator parameters (CAS on VMS)

13 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS applications MDC drift time monitor (LabView CA server) MDC oxygen monitor (VME) MDC gas pressure Spill start Scalers for start, veto and trigger detectors RICH gas monitor RICH HV trip sequencer

14 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS security Security is now enabled on an (UNIX) account basis All read parameters are visible to everybody All set parameters are owned by accounts

15 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 Experience with EPICS As with all complex systems the learning curve is quite steep at the beginning. It proved to be very helpful to copy an existing example application. Addition of new hardware and drivers is quite easy, but requires moderate C experience Configuration of record database and GUI is easy.

16 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 Experience with EPICS Connection to LabView works well 1 to 2 persons is sufficient to build up and maintain the installation Integration of a SQL database is a complex task and requires agents on host machines. No version management of parameter sets

17 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS overview Tool Based: –EPICS provides a number of tools for creating a control system. This minimizes the need for custom coding and helps ensure uniform operator interfaces. Distributed: –An arbitrary number of IOCs and OPIs can be supported. As long as the network is not saturated, no single bottle neck is present. A distributed system scales nicely. If a single IOC becomes saturated, it's functions can be spread over several IOCs. Rather than running all applications on a single host, the applications can be spread over many OPIs.

18 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS overview

19 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS overview OPI –Operator Interface. This is a UNIX based workstation which can run various EPICS tools (WinNT too). IOC –Input Output Controller. This is VME/VXI based chassis containing a Motorola 68xxx processor, various I/O modules, and VME modules that provide access to other I/O buses such as GPIB. LAN –Local area network. This is the communication network which allows the IOCs and OPIs to communicate. EPICS provides a software component, Channel Access, which provides network transparent communication between a Channel Access client and an arbitrary number of Channel Access servers.

20 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS overview DATABASE: –The memory resident database plus associated data structures. Database Access: –Database access routines. With the exception of record and device support, all access to the database is via the database access routines. Scanners: –The mechanism for deciding when records should be processed. Record Support: –Each record type has an associated set of record support routines. Device Support: –Each record type has one or more sets of device support routines.

21 Control Systems for Future GSI, May , 2003 EPICS overview Device Drivers: –Device drivers access external devices. A driver may have an associated driver interrupt routine. Channel Access: –The interface between the external world and the IOC. It provides a network independent interface to database access. Monitors: –Database monitors are invoked when database field values change. Sequencer –A finite state machine.


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