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CPA FOOD SAFETY FOOD LEGISLATION www.ELDIN.co.za Legislation Safety Quality Training Copyright.

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Presentation on theme: "CPA FOOD SAFETY FOOD LEGISLATION www.ELDIN.co.za Legislation Safety Quality Training Copyright."— Presentation transcript:

1 CPA FOOD SAFETY FOOD LEGISLATION Legislation Safety Quality Training Copyright

2 RETAIL AND CATERING SECTOR (Suppliers, employees, owners, RASA, Department of Health and other appropriate reputable organisations / service providers) South African Legislation International standards FOOD SAFETY National and internationally recognised certification FOOD SAFETY National and internationally recognised certification CPA FCD Act R 918R 146 R 127 R 918R 146 R 127 CODEX CDCWHO FAOFDAFSA EFSAFSANZ CODEX CDCWHO FAOFDAFSA EFSAFSANZ Continuous improvement of food safety by developing standards Training, verifying implementation of standards, updating standards Copyright

3 The legal stuff CPA – New fundamental consumer rights Considered to be of the worst protected -> best protected. Every consumer right places an obligation on the Restaurateur. Liability of the Restaurateur. Food legislation (FCD Act) – R 918 General hygiene requirements for food premises (1999). – R 908 HACCP (2003) – awaiting implementation date for food preparation and catering sector. – R 146 Labelling and advertising of foodstuffs (2010). – R 127 Trans-fat in foodstuffs (2011)

4 The CPA in a nutshell CPA defined fundamental consumer rights: – Fair value, good quality and safety – Restaurateur accountability -> liability – Disclosure of information – including warnings regarding risks / hazards – Informed choices – Fair, just, honest, reasonable: Marketing (Pictorials, truthful, availability of products) Privacy Dealings Terms and conditions Equality in the consumer market

5 Typical food safety hazards Microbiological Can potentially affect a large number of customers High risk Allergens Can potentially affect <10% customers Medium risk Chemical Can potentially affect a large number of customers High risk Physical Can potentially affect a large number of customers Low risk

6 USA – CDC estimates of food borne incidents : 48 million people (1 in 6 falls ill) p.a hospitalisations p.a deaths p.a. Estimated cost of 380 million US$ p.a. Australia – New South Wales Food Authority estimates: 5.4 million foodborne incidents p.a. 120 deaths p.a. Microbiological hazardHigh risk Copyright

7 Microbiological hazards include: – Bacteria and their toxins – Parasites – Viruses Microbiological hazardHigh risk Food handlers Equipment Contaminated food Kitchen practices Copyright

8 The main microbial culprits: Microbiological hazardHigh risk IllnessHospitalisationsDeaths Salmonella E. coli Norovirus Campylobacter Toxoplasma Clostridium StreptococcusListeria Copyright

9 Case study of a recent microbiological incident Germany & France – May - July 2011 incident with E. coli O104:H cases of bloody diarrhoea 852 cases of HUS (kidney disease) 53 deaths Cause : Raw sprouts supplied to supermarkets & restaurants – Preventable with proper sanitation procedures Microbiological hazardHigh risk Copyright

10 Allergens – As much as 10% of the world’s population suffer from some food allergy. – A higher percentage of children are allergic compared to adults. – Seafood and nut allergies are most prevalent. – Some allergens cause mild to severe discomfort and illness, whilst other can cause anaphylactic shock and death. Allergen hazardHigh risk Copyright

11 Allergens According to South African legislation, consumers must be warned of the fact or the possibility of both common and uncommon allergens in foods. In R 146, the following foodstuffs are defined as allergens: – Common allergens: Egg, cow’s milk, crustaceans and molluscs, fish, peanuts, soybeans, tree nuts and significant cereals (wheat, rye, barley, spelt, oats and their hybrids). – Uncommon allergens include: Sulphites (> 10 ppm), sesame, mustard, celery, lupin Allergen hazardHigh risk Copyright

12 The prevalence of allergen incidents: – North America Some deaths per year are ascribed to food anaphylaxis. – USA Almost half of fatal food-allergic reactions, involved food provided by restaurant or food service establishment. Incidents have doubled over the last decade. Allergen hazardHigh risk Copyright

13 Examples of chemical hazards include: – Aflatoxins – Pesticides – Sanitizers and cleansers – Non-food grade lubricants Chemical hazardMedium risk Copyright

14 Examples of chemical hazards include: – Aflatoxins – Pesticides – Sanitizers and cleansers – Non-food grade lubricants Chemical hazardMedium risk Physical hazardLow risk Examples of physical hazards include: – Pests, animal origin – Hair, jewelry, bandages, rubber – Paper, wood, stones, glass, metal, plastic Copyright

15 Good manufacturing practices & hygiene standards, eg: – Clean and sanitize. – Control temperatures and times. – Avoid cross-contamination. Supplier approval & management – Know your ingredients. – Select approved suppliers. – Keep good records of where foods and food ingredients come from. How do youminimizetheserisks? Copyright

16 Training – From menial jobs to management. – Includes regular re-fresher training and informal/ surprise audits. – Appoint Food Safety Officer. – Train and certify managers in food safety. Food safety management system – WHO 5 keys – FDA Model Food Code – Implement a food safety system based on HACCP principles (i.e. HACCP-prelude). – Internal and informal safety system audits. How do youminimizetheserisks? Copyright

17 What is the value of standards? What standards are referred to? Are these standards benchmarked? How do you measure against these standards? Formal acknowledgement for your efforts? HACCP – Is the identified food safety management system in R908 – Is an internationally recognised standard. – Is formally acknowledged

18 What is HACCP? An internationally recognised food safety management system. Consists of 7 principles: – Conduct a hazard analysis. – Determine the Critical Control Points – Establish critical limits – Monitor control of the CCPS – Establish corrective action – Verify – Document

19 CPA FCD Act Codex FSA CDC FDA FAO EFSA FSANZ Codex FSA CDC FDA FAO EFSA FSANZ What does it all mean? How to make sense of it all? Liability Food safety R 918 R 908 R 146 R 127 HACCP Hazards Training & records Choice Information Fair, quality, safety Account - ability In summary…

20 What do we offer? Food science Degreed professionals SAAFoST members SACNASP registration Experience in the food industry Food safety & quality management SABS ISO 9000 HACCP ISO Standards Developing standards Develop training material Conducting training Copyright

21 INDUSTRY COMPLIANCE AND ACCEPTANCE FORMALISED FOOD SAFETY SYSTEMS Audit by RASA approved service provider Develop industry accepted standard based on WHO, Codex, EFSA, FDA, FSA, FSANZ, DoH >66% score >80% score National & International food safety standard Accredited certification “HACCP” Accredited certification “HACCP” Build up from legal requirements and continuously improve to achieve world class practice Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 1 Level 2 R 146 R 127 R 918 Others R 146 R 127 R 918 Others >80% score REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS FOODSTUFFS, COSMETICS AND DISINFECTANTS ACT REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS FOODSTUFFS, COSMETICS AND DISINFECTANTS ACT R 918 >66% score Audit by RASA approved service provider


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