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M100: Music Appreciation Discussion Group Ben Tibbetts, T.A. Welcome! Please sign the attendance at the front of the room.

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Presentation on theme: "M100: Music Appreciation Discussion Group Ben Tibbetts, T.A. Welcome! Please sign the attendance at the front of the room."— Presentation transcript:

1 M100: Music Appreciation Discussion Group Ben Tibbetts, T.A. Welcome! Please sign the attendance at the front of the room. Thursday February 21, 2013

2 Welcome Kristen’s students!

3 Upcoming Events Baroque Test next class (Tues. Feb. 26) will cover everything pp and Thurs. Feb. 28 will be Classical Lecture Concert on March 2 nd at 4pm The UMass Wind Ensemble

4 Tuesday’s Test Will include Listening / Identifying* Short Answer Essay *anything in Listening Logs is fair game

5 Slides are uploaded to

6 Today’s Agenda Baroque Take-Home Assignments Pages Tangent: Orchestral Instruments

7 Baroque Take-Home Assignments

8 The Baroque Era ( ): Take-Home Assignment Part #1 Some characteristics of Baroque music: Coexistence of polyphony and homophony Sophisticated, carefully designed counterpoint (interaction between two or more independent melodies) Virtuosity and complexity Rhythmic extremes ~pp

9 The Baroque Era ( ): Take-Home Assignment Part #1 Some general characteristics of the arts during this time: Energy and motion Ornamentation and extreme contrasts Expressing only a single emotion, or affect, within a work—and staying consistent. ~pp

10 The Baroque Era ( ): Take-Home Assignment Part #2 How rulers (i.e. King George I and Louis XIV) used music: Advertise wealth and dominion Personal entertainment How the church (Christian Catholic) used music: Convey teachings Supplement services Arouse religious fervor ~pp

11 The Baroque Era ( ): Take-Home Assignment Part #3 How did homophony make operas and concertos possible? Homophony causes a single “voice” or melody to be emphasized and contrasted with accompanying instruments In operas, homophony enabled singers to embody individual characters. In concertos, homophony enabled instrumental soloists to draw attention to themselves and showcase technical/expressive skills. ~pp

12 The Baroque Era ( ): Take-Home Assignment Part #4 The Ritornello principle: “The formal design of alternating Ritornello and solo sections.” ~p. 518 Genres: *Concertos* Operatic arias Cantatas Oratorios (?) ~p. 127

13 (end review)

14 Johann Sebastian Bach (again) German composer/organist

15 Cantatas Cantata – “a type of vocal genre typically sung during a service of worship. In Italian: ‘that which is sung,’ as opposed to sonata, ‘that which is played.’” ~p. 515 Bach wrote more than 200 cantatas in his lifetime. Today hearing selections from Cantata 140: Awake, a Voice Calls to Us and doing some basic music analysis

16 This cantata derives some text/music from an old hymn tune. In the last movement, Bach presents this hymn directly

17 Bach’s Cantata 140: Awake, a Voice Calls to Us, movement 7 (Chorale)

18 Bar Form This chorale exhibits bar form (or song form) – “a melodic form in which the opening phrase is sung twice and a contrasting phrase follows (AAB).” –p. 515 Name is deceptive Notice it’s a melodic form – referring to structure within a melody

19 This is an example of homophony The melody is in the uppermost voice All the other parts provide harmonic support

20 Listen Again Bach’s Cantata 140: Awake, a Voice Calls to Us, movement 7 (Chorale)

21 In the first movement this melody is subtly woven into the fabric of the music. This time, it is slower There are substantial pauses after each line And even longer pauses between the melodic sections A | A | B Provides “commentary” ~p. 150

22 Ritornello Here, again, we can hear the ritornello principle at work. The orchestra and the chorus are alternating top priority.

23 Bach’s Cantata 140: Awake, a Voice Calls to Us, movement 1 (Chorus)

24 George Frederic Handel (again) German/British composer

25 Opera vs. Oratorio Review some terms: Opera – “a drama sung from beginning to end.” –p. 517 Recitative – “A style of singing that lies somewhere between lyrical song and speech;” –p. 518 Aria – “Italian for ‘air’ or ‘melody’; any lyrical movement or piece for solo voice, usually with some kind of instrumental accompaniment.” –p. 515 Chorus – “An ensemble with multiple singers to a part; ‘chorus’ is also the name for the musical number or movement sung by this ensemble.” –p. 515

26 Opera vs. Oratorio Oratorio – “a work musically similar to an opera but not staged, and usually on a sacred topic.” –p. 517 Musically identical to an opera But not staged (no costumes, actors, etc.)

27 Excerpts from Handel’s oratorio Messiah

28 He that dwelleth in heaven (recitative) And Thou shalt break them (aria) ~From Handel’s Messiah~ TEXT: Recitative: He that dwelleth in heaven shall laugh them to scorn; the Lord shall have them in derision. Aria: Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.

29 “Those being ‘broken’ and ‘dashed’ in the text are the heathen, the unbelievers who scorn God.” –p. 155 How does the music capture this violent imagery?

30 He that dwelleth in heaven (recitative) And Thou shalt break them (aria) ~From Handel’s Messiah~ TEXT: Recitative: He that dwelleth in heaven shall laugh them to scorn; the Lord shall have them in derision. Aria: Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.

31 Another excerpt from Messiah: the Hallelujah chorus TEXT: Hallelujah! for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth. the Kingdom of this world is become the Kingdom of our Lord, and of His Christ; and He shall reign for ever and ever, King of Kings, Lord of Lords.

32 Tangent: Orchestral Instruments

33

34

35 Strings (group) Excerpt from Adagio for Strings by Samuel Barber

36 Strings: The Violin Excerpt from Paganini’s Caprice No. 24

37 Strings: The Viola Excerpt from Bach’s Partita No. 2, Giga (performed on viola)

38 Strings: The Cello Excerpt from Bach’s Cello Suite No. 2, Prelude

39 Strings: The Bass Excerpt from Johnterryl Plumeri’s The Cave of Peacock Springs

40 Woodwinds (group) Excerpt from Haydn’s Divertimento No. 1 in Bb Major

41 Woodwinds: The Flute Excerpt from Edgar Varese’s Density 21.5

42 Woodwinds: The Oboe Excerpt from C.P.E. Bach’s Sonata for solo oboe wq. 132

43 Woodwinds: The Clarinet Excerpt from Marco Oppedisano’s Glimpses

44 Woodwinds: The Bassoon Excerpt from Malcolm Arnold’s Fantasy for Solo Bassoon

45 Brass (group) Excerpt from Bartok’s Concerto for Orchestra movement 2

46 Brass: The Horn Excerpt from Vincent Persichetti’s Parable VIII for solo horn

47 Brass: The Trumpet Excerpt from The Carnival of Venice (folk tune) performed by Allen Vizzutti

48 Brass: The Trombone Excerpt from an improvisation by Michael Dease

49 Brass: The Tuba Excerpt from Penderecki’s Capriccio for tuba solo

50 Percussion: The Cymbals Excerpt from a Vic-Firth Percussion 101 video

51 Percussion: The Snare Drum Excerpt from a marching snare drum solo by Isiah Rowser

52 Percussion: The Bass Drum Excerpt provided by “Clngre” (YouTube username)

53 Percussion: The Timpani Excerpt from Molto Perpetuo by Elliott Carter

54 Again, these slides (and those recordings of orchestral instruments) are uploaded to

55 Final Reminders / Homework Study pp and for the test next Tuesday Questions?


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