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Friday –TURN IN: Ch. 15 & Ch.34 worksheet (to me) 1.Beginning (5 min) finish putting together posters. 2.(3 min) presentations (everyone take notes).please.

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Presentation on theme: "Friday –TURN IN: Ch. 15 & Ch.34 worksheet (to me) 1.Beginning (5 min) finish putting together posters. 2.(3 min) presentations (everyone take notes).please."— Presentation transcript:

1 Friday –TURN IN: Ch. 15 & Ch.34 worksheet (to me) 1.Beginning (5 min) finish putting together posters. 2.(3 min) presentations (everyone take notes).please write down name/ short description of artwork 3.(Last 15 min: Jeopardy Review Game) –If we run out of time, I’ll put this on my website so you can review at home.

2 Will only have 1 or 2 questions relating to African Art. –Based on the 4 images I gave you. Test is Primarily Ancient Near East & Egyptian.

3 UNIT 1 TEST TEST Monday, STUDY! –UNIT 1 Image Packet –UNIT image P.P. on my website –My WEBSITE: Online Resources: Image P.P. by Darrocott ( ARTWORK BY THEMES) –STUDY VOCAB FROM QUIZZES! The FORMAT (will have some images) –Identification –Multiple choice –Short answer –Short essay (2) –Long essay (1)  There will be chance for extra credit points  Will use bell curve if needed  DO NOT SKIP CLASS! MAKE-UP TEST IS ALL LONG ESSAYS.

4 Art of Africa

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6 Core Beliefs Honor Ancestor Worship Deities Elevate Rulers to Sacred Status

7 Nomadic vs. Farmers Nomadic Art: –Personal adornment, rock engravings, animal/ ritual paintings Settled Farmers: –Figures (wood, clay, metal) shrines to ancestor deities. Pray for good crops.

8 THE ART THEMES: Images of Identity/ Status/ Worship/ Power/ and Gender Roles Naturalism &/or Extreme Stylization (abstract/ exagerations) Materials: wood, terrecotta, ivory, brass (casting), textiles

9 Below: Head from the Nok culture, c. 500 BCE-200 CE, terracotta Right: Standing Nok figure

10 Nok culture/ problems of preservation of African art/ stylization vs. naturalism style characteristics: piereced eyes, mouth, & ear holes. Let heat get out during firing. Broken bands on neck, ~ indication of elevated status

11 Head of a King (Ife), c. 13 th century CE, brass naturalistic sculpture in the city of Ife/ scarification on the face of an oni “King”/ holes along the neck

12 Right: King (Ife, Nigeria), eleventh to twelfth century, zinc brass Below: Memorial Head (Benin, Nigeria), c CE, brass

13 Belief: –Head is the Location of Wisdom, Destiny, Essence of Being, & ability to communicate with spiritual forces in the ancestral world.

14 Casting Tradition Memorial Heads “Rolled Collars ”

15 Head of an oba (Benin), c CE, brass kingdom of Benin/ an “oba” with identification marks (ikharo)/ appearance of casting due to contact with Portuguese traders/ coral-bead necklaces threaded with elephant hair/ eyes with pupils inset with iron

16 Brass commemorative head with tusk from the altar for Oba Ovonramwen, photographed in 1970

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18 Corn Flakes Make Really Funky Pop- Sicles Content Focus Mood Realistic Function Patron Setting Mounted King and Attendants (Benin), c , bronze

19 Corn Flakes Make Really Funky Pop- Sicles Content Focus Mood Realism Function Patron Setting

20 Mounted King and Attendants (Benin), c , bronze high relief cast sculpture created for a door/ use of hierarchical proportion/ flanking figures used to create a symmetrical composition suggesting order reinforced by cosmic imagery or symbolism

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24 Oba wearing coral- beaded regalia and seated on a dais

25 Africa after 1800

26 Europeans : –Exploration –Trade –Influences to African Cultures (christianity)

27 Children & Continuity of Life Children- –symbolize the future. –social security (for parents) Yoruba- 1 of highest rates of twin births Often birth complications (deaths)

28 Left and Right: Twin figures (ere ibeji) from the Yoruba (Nigeria), 20 th century, wood

29 Art forms of deceased honored. (dress, dance, sing to it) Belief: honoring will bring good fortune to the surviving members.

30 Twin figures of the Yoruba (Nigeria), early twentieth century, cowrie shells and wood

31 Spirit World Many cultures believe there are many different spirits involved for human offers Nkisis: objects that harness spirit forces Diviner: specialist in ritual & spiritual practices

32 Power figures of the Kongo culture (Zaire), 19 th century, wood, nails, pins, blades, and other materials power figures (nkisi nkonde) of the Kongo culture/ bilongo ingredients drawn from plants, animals, and minerals (includes human hair, nail clippings, etc…) to bring a “neutral figure” to life

33 Nails or pointed objects driven in (or removed) to provide a particular function (oath-taking, healing, etc…)/ “pakalala” pose, a stance of alertness, ready to strike or attract/ problematic issues regarding Western concepts of “art” and “artist”

34 Abogunde of Ede. Shango shrine figure holding a dance staff, Yoruba (Nigeria), nineteenth century, wood and beads large number of orisha of the Yoruba/ Shango, god of thunder/ oshe shango staff used in a ritualistic hypnotic state/ balancing a double axe, carrying the burden of child-bearing and child rearing/ suggestion of purity through nudity

35 A figure of Eshu of the Yoruba (Nigeria), twentieth century, wood and cowrie shells Eshu (disorder) and Orunmila (order) / mediator between gods and humans/ long braids of cowrie shells, referencing his role as god of the marketplace

36 Ancestral Couple (?) (Dogon, Mali), c. 19 th century, wood Dogon concept of the primordial couple/ protective male and the nurturing female/ reverence for ancestors

37 Male Chi Wara Antelope Headdress, Bamana, Mali, 19th-20th century, wood

38 Reliquary guardian figure of the Kota (Gabon), nineteenth and twentieth centuries, wood, copper, iron, and brass Kota funerary figures (mbulu- ngulu)/ bwete bundle of bones and relics/ highly stylized human form to suggest non-human spiritual forces/ reflective brass and copper used as an apotropaic device to deflect evil forces

39 Kente cloth of the Ashanti (Ghana), 20 th century, silk

40 Ashanti, known for their woven textiles/ kente cloth, woven with patterns signifying rank/ warp (vertical threads in weaving that are attached to the top and bottom of a loom, through which a weft is woven)/ weft (threads of yarn woven over and under warp threads)/ worn when the king held court

41 An akuaba figure of the Akan (Ghana), nineteenth-twentieth century, wood

42 Shrine figure (akua mma) of the Ashanti (Ghana), wood

43 Figure of a Tano priest of the Akan (Ghana), nineteenth-twentieth century, wood

44 Female mask of the Mende (Sierra Leone), wood masks from the Mende worn by priestesses or judges (when women rule for three years in a ritual calendar, alternating with men) in ritual dance/ the Sande society of women (complementary to the Poro society of men)

45 a small closed mouth and downcast eyes (indicating a serious demeanor) and a high, broad forehead (wisdom)/ black surface evoking ancestral spirits emergent from their underwater homes (also symbolized by the turtle on top)

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48 Lets Analyze!

49 Corn Flakes Make Really Funky Pop- Sicles Content Focus Mood Realistic Function Patron Setting

50 Corn Flakes Make Really Funky Pop- Sicles Content Focus Mood Realism Function Patron Setting


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