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Lights, Camera, and Action! Gr ade 10 Optics Unit SNC2D & SNC2P Dan Bruni York Catholic District School Board

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Presentation on theme: "Lights, Camera, and Action! Gr ade 10 Optics Unit SNC2D & SNC2P Dan Bruni York Catholic District School Board"— Presentation transcript:

1 Lights, Camera, and Action! Gr ade 10 Optics Unit SNC2D & SNC2P Dan Bruni York Catholic District School Board

2 Lights, Camera, and Action! – Grade 10 Optics Unit (SNC2D & SNC2P) Ex amine how light can be used to create telescopes, microscopes, and eyeglasses through hands-on inquiry-based learning. Examine optical effects and illusions, and use computer simulations to aid conceptual understanding while testing hypotheses. Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM, Thursday November 10, 2011 Session #1220 Presenter: Dan Bruni

3 ·Addressing Misconceptions: Assessement For Learning ·The Continuum of Scientific Inquiry ·Why Use Simulations in Science? ·When Can You Use Simulations in Science? ·Colour Theory, Vision and Optical Illusions Session Outline

4 Disagree Agree Pull Disagree Agree Pull Addressing Misconceptions: Assessement For Learning Properties of Light and Light Reflection Disagree Agree Pull

5 Disagree Agree Pull Disagree Agree

6 Disagree Agree Pull Disagree Agree Pull Refraction of Light

7 Disagree Agree Pull Disagree Agree Pull Light and Colour (SNC 2P) Disagree Agree Pull

8 Disagree Agree Pull Lenses an Optical Devices Disagree Agree Pull Disagree Agree

9 The Continuum of Scientific Inquiry P.E.O.E Guided Inquiry Open-Ended Inquiry Questioning Project/Problem Based Learning

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11 Nile River Delta at Night One of the fascinating aspects of viewing Earth at night is how well the lights show the distribution of people. In this view of Egypt, the population is shown to be almost completely concentrated along the Nile Valley, just a small percentage of the country’s land area. The Nile River and its delta look like a brilliant, long-stemmed flower in this photograph of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the International Space Station. The Cairo metropolitan area forms a particularly bright base of the flower. The smaller cities and towns within the Nile Delta tend to be hard to see amidst the dense agricultural vegetation during the day. However, these settled areas and the connecting roads between them become clearly visible at night. Likewise, urbanized regions and infrastructure along the Nile River becomes apparent. Scattered blue-grey clouds cover the Mediterranean Sea and the Sinai, while much of northeastern Africa is cloud-free. The thin yellow-brown band tracing the Earth’s curvature at the top of the image is airglow, a faint band of light emission that results from the interaction of atmospheric atoms and molecules with solar radiation at an altitude of approximately 60 miles (100 kilometers). This astronaut photograph was taken by the Expedition 25 crew on Oct. 28, 2010, with a Nikon D3S digital camera using a 16 mm lens. Pull This could help in the search for alien life!

12 Compare water droplets to gel balls!

13 Pull

14 + Some potential for open-ended inquiry with different variables!

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16 change to using multiple lenses microscope telescope

17 Tips for Locating the focus of Curved Lenses and Mirrors 1. Place the converging lens or mirror in the support clip on the optics bench (ruler). 2. Aim the metre stick assembly at a relatively (5m or higher) distant that is transmitting light when all of the lights are off. Examples would be a curtain with a small section left open, or a door frame in a room with a window. 3. Move a sheet of paper back and forth behind the lens (or in front of the mirror, and slightly offset from the ruler) until you see an image as sharp as possible. 4. Mark this location with a piece of chalk on the ruler. This is the focal length of your lens. Mark twice this distance as well. This represents the centre of curvature. 5. Mark the same distances on the opposite side of the lens (mirror) as the secondary focal length and centre of curvature.

18 This simulation allows for many different types of lenses. It can be used to model the effects in the standard single lense optics bench labs

19 This simulation allows for many different types of lenses. It can be used to model the effects in the standard single lense optics bench labs and also multiple lens simulations, such as those present in microscopes and telescopes.

20 Why Use Simulations in Science? Generating and testing hypotheses about new knowledge Teaching & Learning new knowledge directly through demonstration and explanation Representing new knowledge in nonlinguistic/graphic contexts

21 When Can You Use Simulations in Science? ·Warm-Up Exercises ·New Topics ·Misconceptions ·Minds On ·Inquiry Based Learning ·Pre-Lab Hypothesis Testing ·Post Lab Comparison With Observations ·Action ·Assessment of/for Learning ·Homework Checker ·Project/Problem Based Learning, CPT, Summative Evaluation for a Unit/Course ·Consolidate

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24 Colour Theory, Vision and Optical Illusions

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29 The eye sees only three component colours – red, green and blue – which the brain combines to form the images we see. Like all senses, parts of the vision are ‘switched off’ by the brain if the stimulus remains the same for a sufficient period of time. Staring at the green elephant for about 1 minute causes the brain to ‘switch off’ signals from the green light receptors in the eye. When the slide changes to a white background the green receptors cannot get their signals to the brain, which only ‘sees’ the red and blue components. It combines these to form a magenta (pink) elephant. This effect also works with the other primary colours of light to give secondary coloured images – red object – cyan (turquoise) image blue object – yellow image and secondary coloured objects to give primary coloured images – cyan object – red image magenta object – green image yellow object – blue image

30 Seeing Colours

31 Prediction Observation Explain ·Explain the observed colour of the magenta dot for each of the colours of light used. Use the subtraction theory of colour to help explain your answer.

32 To download this presentation go to

33 Attachments bending-light_en.jar geometric-optics_en.jar 10 optical illusions in 2 minutes - YouTube2.rv color-vision_en.jar


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