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Spatial Sciences Education in WA - past, present, future WASC 2013 Thursday 16 May 2013 Professor Bert Veenendaal Head of Department.

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Presentation on theme: "Spatial Sciences Education in WA - past, present, future WASC 2013 Thursday 16 May 2013 Professor Bert Veenendaal Head of Department."— Presentation transcript:

1 Spatial Sciences Education in WA - past, present, future WASC 2013 Thursday 16 May 2013 Professor Bert Veenendaal Head of Department

2 Early beginnings In 1829, John Septimus Roe (8 May 1797 – 28 May 1878) appointed WA’s first Surveyor General. He is tasked with the mapping and management of some 2,527,600 km2 of land WA School of Mines opened in Coolgardie in 1902, then moved to Kalgoorlie in 1903 – commenced with 6 students in surveying Joined Western Australian Institute of Technology in 1969, which now is Curtin University Source: W.E. Fretwell ( ) John Septimus Roe ( )

3 First mine surveying graduates James Peat, Aug 1912 – Sacrificed his life for his country in World War I – 29 June shot and killed by a sniper in the trenches in Germany Source: 80 years, WA School of Mines (1982)

4 Spatial sciences programs structure Undergraduate Mine & Eng Surveying Surveying Geographic Information Science BSc BSurv BSc Postgraduate GIScience Geospatial Science Spatial Sciences Grad Cert Grad Dip MSc MPhil PhD

5 Geospatial Technology Competency Model US Dept of Labour

6 Yr Graduate attributes Discipline- specific (Advanced + Workplace Core+ Advanced Academic +Core Spatial education model Minors +Honours Discipline- specific (Advanced + Workplace Discipline-specific (Core + Advanced) Foundational (Academic + Core) Discipline- specific (Advanced + Workplace Discipline-specific (Core + Advanced) Foundational (Academic + Core) Industry Geographic Information ScienceSurveying Mine & Eng Surveying

7 Distribution and analysis of Graduate Attributes

8 Distribution and analysis of Level of Thinking

9 Measures and analysis

10 The challenges to meet “an additional 2,474 surveyors, 608 spatial scientists, 271 technicians and 180 ‘other’ professionals will be required to meet forecast levels of construction activity and to cover for the replacement of existing employees” [Determining the Future Demand, Supply and Skills Gap for Surveying and Geospatial Professionals, BIS Shrapnel report for Consulting Surveyors National, Jan 2013] 10% gap/short in 2016, 15% gap/short in 2019 Declining student numbers nationally Declining spatial programs in higher education in Australia Declining autonomy for spatial sciences departments Engaging the stakeholders to provide a unified, rationale and convincing stance for spatial sciences education

11 University of the future The Ernst & Young report, titled University of the future: A thousand year old industry on the cusp of profound change, called on universities to specialise by targeting certain student groups, use their assets more efficiently and partner more closely with industry or be left behind Source:

12 Higher Educ drivers Democratisa tion of knowledge and access Digital technologies Integration with industry Global mobility Contestabilit y of markets & funding Adapted from: University of the future, Ernst & Young 2012, p. 6 Five drivers of change

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