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1,000,000. Tom Peters’ RE-IMAGINEEXCELLENCE.INNOVATE. OR PERISH. 16 NOVEMBER 2014 (slides at tompeters.com; also see excellencenow.com)

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Presentation on theme: "1,000,000. Tom Peters’ RE-IMAGINEEXCELLENCE.INNOVATE. OR PERISH. 16 NOVEMBER 2014 (slides at tompeters.com; also see excellencenow.com)"— Presentation transcript:

1 1,000,000

2 Tom Peters’ RE-IMAGINEEXCELLENCE.INNOVATE. OR PERISH. 16 NOVEMBER 2014 (slides at tompeters.com; also see excellencenow.com)

3 11 November 2014: “TEN MILLION JOBS* AT RISK FROM ADVANCING TECHNOLOGY: UP TO 35 PERCENT OF BRITAIN'S JOBS WILL BE ELIMINATED BY NEW COMPUTING AND ROBOTICS TECHNOLOGY OVER THE NEXT 20 YEARS, SAY [DELOITTE/OXFORD UNIVERSITY] EXPERTS.” —Headline,Telegraph (UK) SAY [DELOITTE/OXFORD UNIVERSITY] EXPERTS.” —Headline,Telegraph (UK) * = 25,000,000/Japan, 60,000,000 USA

4 “The root of our problem is “The root of our problem is NOT that we’re in a “Great Recession” that we’re in a “Great Recession” or a “Great Stagnation,” but rather or a “Great Stagnation,” but rather that we are in the early that we are in the early throes of a. Our technologies are racing ahead, throes of a Great Restructuring. Our technologies are racing ahead, but our skills and organizations but our skills and organizations are lagging behind.” are lagging behind.” Source: Race AGAINST the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

5 China/Foxconn: robots/next years 1,000,000 robots/next 3 years Source: Race AGAINST the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

6 “Since 1996, manufacturing employment in China itself has actually fallen by an estimated 25 percent. That’s over 30,000,000 fewer Chinese workers in that sector, even while output soared by 70 percent. It’s not that American workers are being replaced by Chinese workers. It’s that both American and Chinese workers are being made more efficient by automation.” are being replaced by Chinese workers. It’s that both American and Chinese workers are being made more efficient by automation.” —Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a time of Brilliant Technologies

7 “Ten Million Jobs at Risk from Advancing Technology: Up to 35 percent of Britain's jobs will be eliminated by new computing and robotics technology over the next 20 years, say experts [Deloitte/Oxford University]. ” —Headline,Telegraph (UK), 11 November 2014 “ I believe that 90 percent of white- collar/‘knowledge-work’ jobs—which are 80 percent of all jobs—in the U.S. will be either destroyed or altered beyond recognition in the next 10 to 15 years.” —Tom Peters, Cover,Time, 22 May 2000 “The machine plays no favorites between manual and white collar labor.” —Norbert Wiener, 1958

8 “Human level capability has not turned out to be a special stopping point from an engineering perspective.” —Illah Reza Nourbakhsh, Robot Futures/2013 “SOFTWARE IS EATING THE WORLD.” —Marc Andreessen/2014 THE WORLD.” —Marc Andreessen/2014 “The computers are in control. We just live in their world.” —Danny Hillis, Thinking Machines/2011

9 -1/+1

10 S&P /+1* *Every … 2 weeks ! Source: Richard Foster (via Rita McGrath/HBR/ )

11 “Mr. Foster and his McKinsey colleagues collected detailed performance data stretching back 40 years for 1,000 U.S. companies. They found that NONE of the long-term survivors managed to outperform the market. Worse, the longer companies had been in the database, the worse they did.” —Financial Times

12 Dick Kovacevich/Wells Fargo: “YOU DON’T GET BETTER BY BEING BIGGER. YOU GET WORSE.”

13 MITTELSTAND* MITTELSTAND* *“agile creatures darting between the legs of the multinational monsters” (Bloomberg BusinessWeek, 10.10)

14 Aizen Kobo Indigo Workshop* *George Whalin: “Be the best. It’s the only market that’s not crowded.”

15 The Magicians of Motueka & the Mittelstand Trifecta W.A. Coppins Ltd.* (Coppins Sea Anchors/ PSA/para sea anchors) *Textiles, 1898; thrive on “wicked problems” —e.g., U.S. Navy STLVAST (Small To Large Vehicle At Sea Transfer); custom fabric from W. Wiggins Ltd./Wellington (specialty nylon, “Dyneema,” from DSM /Netherlands)

16 My Conclusions My Conclusions 1. Restructuring, not stagnation stagnation (USA = Japan = China = …) (USA = Japan = China = …) 2. Revitalized big companies NOT the companies NOT the (primary) answer (primary) answer

17 Thriving On Chaos: Case Study #1

18 “Burt Rutan [Scaled Composites] wasn’t a fighter pilot; he was an engineer who had been asked to figure out why the an engineer who had been asked to figure out why the [U.S. Air Force] F-4 Phantom was flying pilots into the ground in Vietnam. While his fellow engineers attacked such tasks with calculators, Rutan insisted on considering the problem in the air. A near-fatal flight not only led to a critical F-4 modification, it also confirmed for Rutan a notion he had held ever since he had built model airplanes as a child. The way to make a better aircraft wasn’t to sit around perfecting a design, it was to get something up in the air and see what happens, then try to fix whatever goes wrong.” [U.S. Air Force] F-4 Phantom was flying pilots into the ground in Vietnam. While his fellow engineers attacked such tasks with calculators, Rutan insisted on considering the problem in the air. A near-fatal flight not only led to a critical F-4 modification, it also confirmed for Rutan a notion he had held ever since he had built model airplanes as a child. The way to make a better aircraft wasn’t to sit around perfecting a design, it was to get something up in the air and see what happens, then try to fix whatever goes wrong.” —Eric Abrahamson & David Freedman, Chapter 8, “Messy Leadership,” from A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder

19 “What are Rutan’s management rules? He insists he doesn’t have any. ‘I don’t like rules,’ he says. ‘Things are so easy to change if you don’t write them down.’ Rutan feels good management works in much the same way good aircraft design does: Instead of trying to figure out the best way to do something and sticking to it, just try out an approach and keep fixing it.” —Eric Abrahamson & David Freedman, Chapter 8, “Messy Leadership,” from A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder

20 “One Rutan principle is not to worry so much about the formal background of the engineers he hires or to look for the sorts of specialties normally sought after by aerospace companies. Instead, he looks for people who share his passion for aircraft design and who can work on anything from a fuselage to a door handle or are willing to learn how. He then gives those people free rein.” —Eric Abrahamson & David Freedman, Chapter 8, “Messy Leadership,” A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder

21 “A Rutan principle is that it’s useful to have everyone questioning everything the company does all the time, and especially have people questioning their own work. Rutan makes sure that when employees point out their mistakes, they’re applauded rather than reprimanded.” —Eric Abrahamson & David Freedman, Chapter 8, “Messy Leadership,” A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder

22 Bert Rutan’s No Rules “Rules” *Get going, now; fix it after you’ve gotten started. *Forget “best,” forget rules—just run like mad and adjust fast. *People with passion and breadth—given freedom from Day #1 to try any-damn- thing. (Specialism secondary.) *Everyone questions everything (and everyone) all the time. *Applaud mistakes—AND the person who made them. Bert Rutan’s No Rules “Rules” *Get going, now; fix it after you’ve gotten started. *Forget “best,” forget rules—just run like mad and adjust fast. *People with passion and breadth—given freedom from Day #1 to try any-damn- thing. (Specialism secondary.) *Everyone questions everything (and everyone) all the time. *Applaud mistakes—AND the person who made them.

23 Thriving On Chaos: Case Study #2

24 “ ‘Success,’ Honda said, ‘can only be achieved through repeated failure and introspection. Success represents one percent of your work, which results only from the ninety-nine percent that is called failure.’ ” —Jeffrey Rothfeder, Driving Honda: Inside the World’s Most Innovative Car Company

25 “Asked for the most important attribute that an ideal Honda applicant should have, [Honda] noted that he preferred ‘people who had been in trouble.’” “Honda believed genius arose from idiosyncrasy, ‘Non-conformity is essential,’ he told his workers.’” Source: Jeffrey Rothfeder, Driving Honda: Inside the World’s Most Innovative Car Company

26 “He encouraged the board to authorize spinning off the R&D division into an entirely separate and independent subsidiary of Honda Motor, and he gave the new unit total autonomy to develop its own research agenda and strategic direction.” To further ensure that R&D had few constraints, he eliminated rank among the engineers, assuming that a mostly flat organization would encourage engineers to try out new ideas without fear of being rebuffed. ‘Within Honda R&D, we have an expression that all engineers are equal in the presence of technology.’” Source: Jeffrey Rothfeder, Driving Honda: Inside the World’s Most Innovative Car Company

27 The Honda Way The Honda Way *Individual responsibility over corporate mandates mandates *A flat organization *Autonomous and ad hoc design, development and manufacturing teams development and manufacturing teams that are nonetheless continuously that are nonetheless continuously accountable to one another accountable to one another *Perpetual change as working medium *Unyielding cynicism about what is believed to be truth believed to be truth —Jeffrey Rothfeder, Driving Honda: Inside the World’s Most Innovative Car Company

28 Bert Rutan’s No Rules “Rules” 1. Get going, now; fix it after you’ve gotten started. 2. Forget “best,” forget rules—just run like mad and adjust fast. 3. People with passion and breadth—given freedom from Day #1 to try any-damn- thing. (Specialism secondary.) 4. Everyone questions everything all the time. No sacred cows (principles). No sacred cows (people). 5. Applaud mistakes—AND the person who made them. Bert Rutan’s No Rules “Rules” 1. Get going, now; fix it after you’ve gotten started. 2. Forget “best,” forget rules—just run like mad and adjust fast. 3. People with passion and breadth—given freedom from Day #1 to try any-damn- thing. (Specialism secondary.) 4. Everyone questions everything all the time. No sacred cows (principles). No sacred cows (people). 5. Applaud mistakes—AND the person who made them.

29 #1 /1982 #1++ /2014

30 Excellence82: The Bedrock “Eight Basics” Excellence82: The Bedrock “Eight Basics” 1. A Bias for Action 2. Close to the Customer 3. Autonomy and Entrepreneurship 4. Productivity Through People 5. Hands On, Value-Driven 6. Stick to the Knitting 7. Simple Form, Lean Staff 8. Simultaneous Loose-Tight Properties Properties

31 1/48/ WTTMTW

32 WHOEVERTRIESTHEMOSTTHINGSWINS

33 “ WE HAVE A STRATEGIC PLAN. IT’S CALLED ‘DOING THINGS.’ ” —Herb Kelleher “DON’T ‘PLAN.’ DO STUFF.” “ WE HAVE A STRATEGIC PLAN. IT’S CALLED ‘DOING THINGS.’ ” —Herb Kelleher “DON’T ‘PLAN.’ DO STUFF.” —David Kelley/IDEO

34 “We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were omissions we didn’t think of when we initially wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design perfect, we’re already on prototype version # 5. By the time our rivals are ready with wires and screws, we are on version #10. It gets back to planning versus acting: We act from day one; others plan how to plan—for months.” —Bloomberg by Bloomberg

35 Culture of Rapid Prototyping “Effective prototyping may be THE MOST VALUABLE CORE COMPETENCE an innovative organization can hope to have.” —Michael Schrage

36 Minimize & measure: “mean- time-to- prototype” Source: Sony/Akio Morita/reported by Michael Schrage in Serious Play

37 “You can’t be a serious innovator unless and until you are ready, willing and able to seriously play. ‘ Serious play’ is not an oxymoron; it is the essence of innovation.” —Michael Schrage, Serious Play

38 “Learn not to be careful.” —Photographer Diane Arbus to her students (Careful = Stay on the sidelines)

39 “EXPERIMENT FEARLESSLY” Tactic #1 “RELENTLESS TRIAL AND ERROR” Source: Wall Street Journal, “cornerstone” of effective approach to “rebalancing” company portfolios in the face of changing and uncertain global economic conditions “EXPERIMENT FEARLESSLY” —BusinessWeek, “Type A Organization Strategies: How to Hit a Moving Target”— Tactic #1 “RELENTLESS TRIAL AND ERROR” Source: Wall Street Journal, “cornerstone” of effective approach to “rebalancing” company portfolios in the face of changing and uncertain global economic conditions

40 FAIL. FORWARD. FAST.

41 “FAIL. FORWARD. FAST.” “FAIL FASTER. SUCCEED SOONER.” “FAIL. FORWARD. FAST.” —High Tech CEO, Pennsylvania “FAIL FASTER. SUCCEED SOONER.” —David Kelley/IDEO

42 “MOVE FAST. BREAK THINGS.” —Facebook

43 “Fall seven times, stand up eight.” up eight.” —Japanese proverb

44 “ REWARD excellent failures. PUNISH mediocre successes.” —Phil Daniels, Sydney exec

45 “ In business, you REWARD people for taking RISKS. WHEN IT DOESN’T WORK OUT YOU PROMOTE THEM - BECAUSE THEY WERE WILLING TO TRY NEW THINGS. If people tell me they skied all day and never fell down, I tell them to try a different mountain.” —Michael Bloomberg

46 “The secret of fast progress is, fast and furious and numerous failures.” “The secret of fast progress is INEFFICIENCY, fast and furious and numerous failures.” —Kevin Kelly

47 “Natural selection is death.... WITHOUT HUGE AMOUNTS OF DEATH, ORGANISMS DO NOT CHANGE OVER TIME.... Death is the mother of structure.... It took four billion years of death... to invent the human mind...” — The Cobra Event

48 —Paul Saffo “The Silicon Valley of today is built less atop the spires of earlier triumphs than upon the rubble of earlier debacles.” —Paul Saffo

49 Regis McKenna*: “A lot of companies in [Silicon] Valley fail.” Robert Noyce**: “Maybe not enough fail.” RM: “What do you mean by that?” RN: “Whenever you fail, it means you’re trying new things.” *McKenna was the original Silicon Valley “marketing guru” **Robert Noyce/Intel co-founder/co-inventor integrated circuit Source: Fast Company

50 “THE ESSENCE OF CAPITALISM IS ENCOURAGING FAILURE, NOT REWARDING SUCCESS.” —Nassim Nicholas Taleb/Antifragile OF CAPITALISM IS ENCOURAGING FAILURE, NOT REWARDING SUCCESS.” —Nassim Nicholas Taleb/Antifragile

51 “Ideas Economy: CAN YOUR BUSINESS FAIL FAST ENOUGH TO SUCCEED?” Source: ad for Economist Conference / /Berkeley CA (caps are Economist)

52 Richard Farson & Ralph Keyes: Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins: The Paradox of Innovation

53 “It is not enough to ‘tolerate’ failure— you must ‘CELEBRATE’ failure.” —Richard Farson (Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins)

54 WTTMT AMTMM W WTTMT AMTMM W

55 WHOEVERTRIESTHEMOSTTHINGSANDMAKESTHEMOSTMISTAKESWINS

56 Tempo/Temperament

57 “If things seem under control, you’re just not going fast enough.” —Mario Andretti, race driver “I’m not comfortable unless I’m uncomfortable.” —Jay Chiat “If it works, it’s obsolete.” —Marshall McLuhan

58 “We eat change for breakfast.” —Harry Quadracci, founder, QuadGraphics

59 WTTMTAMTMM TF W WTTMTAMTMM TF W

60 WHOEVERTRIESTHEMOSTTHINGSANDMAKESTHEMOSTMISTAKESTHEFASTESTWINS

61 “In Silicon Valley, start-ups are built for speed. There might be a group of six or eight people— say, two from the United States, two from India, one from China, one from Russia— and they can decide in six hours to set up a programming game development center in India.” —Tomoko Namba, former McKinsey partner and founder and CEO, DeNA, “What Japan Can Learn From Silicon Valley”

62 Antifragile*: Things That From Disorder —Nassim Nicholas Taleb *Not to be confused with … RESILIENCE Antifragile*: Things That GAIN From Disorder —Nassim Nicholas Taleb *Not to be confused with … RESILIENCE

63 WE ARE THE COMPANY WE KEEP WE KEEP

64 Diversity: “IT IS HARDLY POSSIBLE TO OVERRATE THE VALUE OF PLACING HUMAN BEINGS IN CONTACT WITH PERSONS DIS-SIMILAR TO THEMSELVES, AND WITH MODES OF THOUGHT AND ACTION UNLIKE THOSE WITH WHICH THEY ARE FAMILIAR. SUCH COMMUNICATION HAS ALWAYS BEEN, AND IS PECULIARLY IN THE PRESENT AGE, ONE OF THE PRIMARY SOURCES OF PROGRESS.” —John Stuart Mill

65 —this can be either a blessing or a curse.” —Billy Cox “You will become like the five people you associate with the most—this can be either a blessing or a curse.” —Billy Cox

66 The “We are what we eat” axiom: At its core, every (!!!) relationship-partnership decision (employee, vendor, customer, etc) is a strategic decision about: “Innovate, ‘Yes’ or ” The “We are what we eat” axiom: At its core, every (!!!) relationship-partnership decision (employee, vendor, customer, etc) is a strategic decision about: “Innovate, ‘Yes’ or ‘No’”

67 “[CEO A.G.] Lafley has shifted P&G’s focus on inventing all its own products to developing … OTHERS’ INVENTIONS ‘AT LEAST HALF THE TIME.’ One successful example, Mr. Clean Magic Eraser, based on a product found in an Osaka market.” — Fortune

68 “DON’T ‘BENCHMARK,’ FUTURE MARK!” “DON’T ‘BENCHMARK,’ ‘OTHER’ MARK!” “DON’T ‘BENCHMARK,’ FUTURE MARK!” “DON’T ‘BENCHMARK,’ ‘OTHER’ MARK!” Impetus: “The future is already here; it’s just not evenly distributed” —William Gibson

69 WE ARE THE COMPANY WE KEEP! WE KEEP! MANAGE IT!

70 The Bottleneck is at the … “Where are you likely to find people with the least diversity of experience, the largest investment in the past, and the greatest reverence for industry dogma … Top of the Bottle.” — Gary Hamel/Harvard Business Review “ The Bottleneck is at the … “Where are you likely to find people with the least diversity of experience, the largest investment in the past, and the greatest reverence for industry dogma … Top of the Bottle.” — Gary Hamel/Harvard Business Review

71 “At Nissan, 30 percent of the corporate officers are foreigners, chiefly British, French, and American. We are happy to show that diversity can work in Japan. Just because a company has more foreigners at the top doesn’t mean it has lost its identity as a Japanese company … a company has more foreigners at the top doesn’t mean it has lost its identity as a Japanese company … “At the most basic level, diversity in Japan means having more women in the workforce. The country needs more active people and the most obvious resource is women. I don’t think Japan has a choice here.” —Carlos Ghosn, CEO, Renault-Nissan Alliance, “How to Drive Change”

72 THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD AS INNOVATION PARTNER THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD AS INNOVATION PARTNER

73 “The Billion-man Research Team: Companies offering work to online communities are reaping the benefits of … ‘crowdsourcing.’ ” —Headline, Financial Times

74 CEO/ Goldcorp Inc./ Red Lake Source: Rob McEwen/CEO/ Goldcorp Inc./ Red Lake GOLD Source: Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, Don Tapscott & Anthony Williams

75

76 THE CREATIVITY IMPERATIVE THE CREATIVITY IMPERATIVE (ORGANIZATIONS/ NATIONS)

77 “Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource.” —Richard Florida “Every child is born an artist. The trick is to remain an artist.” —Picasso "Creativity can no longer be treated as an elective.” —John Maeda

78 CORPORATE MANDATE #1 2014: Your principal moral obligation as a leader is to develop the skillset, “soft” and “hard,” of every one of the people in your charge (temporary as well as semi-permanent) to the maximum extent of your abilities. The good news: This is also the #1 mid- to long-term … profit maximization strategy!

79 #3: Provide a pride- worthy job.* worthy job.* #2: Help people be successful at their successful at their current job. current job. #1: Help people grow/ prepare for an prepare for an uncertain future.** uncertain future.** *“Provide a secure job.”—NOT POSSIBLE IN **Society—and profitability—demands this. (Or should!)

80 “The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors and actresses can become more than they’ve ever been before, more than they’ve dreamed of being.” more than they’ve dreamed of being.” —Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech

81 THE CREATIVITY IMPERATIVE THE CREATIVITY IMPERATIVE(INDIVIDUALS)

82 Muhammad Yunus: “ ALL HUMAN BEINGS ARE ENTREPRENEURS. When we were in the caves we were all self-employed, finding our food, feeding ourselves. That’s where human history began... As civilization came we suppressed it. We became labor because they stamped us, ‘You are labor.’ We forgot that we are labor.’ We forgot that we are entrepreneurs.” are entrepreneurs.” Source: The News Hour/PBS/

83 “Carpenters bend wood; fletchers bend arrows; wise men fashion themselves.” — Buddha

84 A professional … **Committed to her/his discipline. **Committed to constant growth **Committed to uniform project excellence **Committed to one’s community of peers **Committed to integrity in his/her work and relationships Source: Subroto Bagchi, The Professional: Defining the New Standard of Excellence at Work A professional … **Committed to her/his discipline. **Committed to constant growth **Committed to uniform project excellence **Committed to one’s community of peers **Committed to integrity in his/her work and relationships Source: Subroto Bagchi, The Professional: Defining the New Standard of Excellence at Work

85 “The average age of a startup founder is 40. And high-growth startups are nearly twice as likely to be launched by people over 55 as by people ” —Vivek Wadhwa, Kauffman foundation (Time/ )

86 THIS WILL BE THE WOMAN’S CENTURY

87 “I speak to you with a feminine voice. “I speak to you with a feminine voice. It’s the voice of democracy, of equality. It’s the voice of democracy, of equality. I am certain, ladies and gentlemen, that this will be the woman’s century. In the Portuguese language, words such as life, soul, and hope are of the feminine gender, as are other words like courage and sincerity.” — President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, 1st woman to keynote the United Nations General Assembly (2011) keynote the United Nations General Assembly (2011)

88 “Research suggests that to succeed, start by promoting women.” —Nicholas Kristof, “Twitter, Women, and Power,” NYTimes “In my experience, women make much better executives than men.” —Kip Tindell, CEO, Container Store

89 “ McKinsey & Company found that the international companies with more women on their corporate boards far outperformed the average company boards far outperformed the average company in return on equity and other measures. Operating profit was 56% higher.” in return on equity and other measures. Operating profit was 56% higher.” —Nicholas Kristof, “Twitter, Women, and Power,” NYTimes,

90 “Power Women 100”/Forbes female CEOs of Public Companies: Vs. Men/Market: +28% * (*Post-appointment) Vs. Industry: +15%

91 “Forget CHINA, INDIA and the INTERNET: Economic Growth Is Driven by WOMEN.” Source: Headline, Economist

92 “The growth and success of women- owned businesses is one of the most profound changes taking place in the business world today.” — Margaret Heffernan, How She Does It

93 Innovate or Die: Measure It!

94 Innovation Index: Top 5 8 or higher “Weird”/“Profound”/ “Wow”/“Game-changer” Innovation Index: How many of your Top 5 Strategic Initiatives/Key Projects score 8 or higher (out of 10) on a “Weird”/“Profound”/ “Wow”/“Game-changer” Scale? (At least 3???)

95 Innovate or Perish: Extreme Times Demand Extreme Solutions.

96 “ You can’t behave in a calm, rational manner. You’ve got to be out there on the lunatic fringe.” — Jack Welch

97 “ We are crazy. We should do something when people say it is ‘crazy.’ If people say something is ‘good’, it means someone else is already doing it.” —Hajime Mitarai, CEO, Canon

98 “INSANELY GREAT” STEVE JOBS “RADICALLY THRILLING” “ASTONISH ME” “BUILD SOMETHING GREAT” “MAKE IT IMMORTAL” “INSANELY GREAT” STEVE JOBS “RADICALLY THRILLING” BMW “ASTONISH ME” SERGEI DIAGHLEV, TO A LEAD DANCER “BUILD SOMETHING GREAT” HIROSHI YAMAUCHI, NINTENDO, TO A SENIOR GAME DESIGNER “MAKE IT IMMORTAL” DAVID OGILVY, TO A COPYWRITER.

99 EXCELLENCE 1982: People First. Product First (1T). Limit “MBA-ism.” EXCELLENCE 2014: Innovate or Perish. “If it’s not broken, break it.” People First (new definition).

100


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