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Week 12: Journalism 2001 November 29, 2010. Announcements.

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Presentation on theme: "Week 12: Journalism 2001 November 29, 2010. Announcements."— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 12: Journalism 2001 November 29, 2010

2 Announcements

3 Editorial Assignment Excellent editorials! Excellent editorials! Thoughtful comments Thoughtful comments

4 Upcoming deadlines Feature Story Assignment Feature Story Assignment –Final article due: Monday, December 13 Final eportfolio project: Due December 17 Final eportfolio project: Due December 17 Final Exam: December 17 Final Exam: December 17 –Open book, similar to past AP Stylebook editing assignments

5 Feature story draft: Due tonight! We will review/discuss your drafts/outlines individually We will review/discuss your drafts/outlines individually Another draft due next Monday! Another draft due next Monday! Final story due December 13 Final story due December 13

6 Also tonight In-class assignment: In-class assignment: –Editing classmate Community Journalism story  Make changes, give to reporter  Editing form returned to me: Worth 5 points –Rewrite Community Journalism stories  Using all of the editing suggestions, rewrite/edit your story  final copy to: –Worth 5 points  Stories will be posted on class weblog

7 Chapter 10: Public Relations –Businesses and organizations must:  Get their message out.  Encourage media coverage.  Project positive public image. Bill Gates: “If I was down to my last dollar, I would spend it on PR.” Every organization has a story to tell. PR professionals tell it.

8 What is Public Relations? Promoting an organization, institution or corporation Promoting an organization, institution or corporation UMD Communicators Council UMD Communicators Council UMD Communicators Council UMD Communicators Council –University Relations University RelationsUniversity Relations –Natural Resources Research Institute Natural Resources Research InstituteNatural Resources Research Institute –Minnesota Sea Grant Minnesota Sea GrantMinnesota Sea Grant

9 What is public relations? –Identify the goal –Craft the message –Monitor the results The PR process

10 What do Public Relations pros do? –Produce newsletters and media for employees. –Write news releases –Organize news conferences –Sponsor tours, exhibitions and special events. –Attend conferences and deliver speeches. –Act as the organization’s spokesperson. –Serve as contact for media

11 …and what it isn’t Common myths  PR is glamorous. –PR is a business.  PR is easy. –PR is as rigorous as news reporting.  PR is sleazy. –PR is useful, even vital.

12 Let’s list some PR pros we know: Amy Rutledge Amy Rutledge Julene Boe Julene Boe Amy Norris Amy Norris Pakou Ly Pakou Ly White House White House Jared – Subway Jared – Subway UPS spokesperson UPS spokesperson

13 How Public Relations Differs from Journalism Serves general public Serves organizationsAvoids taking sidesPromotes clientsControls all information Provides information Depends upon PR Depends upon journalist Uses one form of mediaEmploys range of mediaIndividualisticTeam playerGoal: inform the publicGoal: generate goodwill Journalist PR Specialist

14 How Public Relations Differs from Advertising Tries to seduce Tries to motivate with factControls the messageProvides informationFlashy with exaggeration Low-key and serious Expensive Relatively inexpensive Relies on repetitionEfforts are freshBroad audienceAimed at specific audiencePeople try to avoid adsPeople seek out stories Advertising Public Relations

15 Four steps to creating and implementing a PR plan Planning a public relations strategy –Requires efficient communication. –Internal/external options. –Requires research, planning and teamwork. Without a strategy, you can’t achieve your goals 1.Analyze situation. 2.Plan strategy. 3.Implement plan. 4.Evaluate results.

16 Planning a public relations strategy –Write a problem statement.  Who is most affected or involved?  What exactly is the problem?  When and where does it matter most?  Why are we concerned?  How does this affect our public? Analyze the situation

17 Planning a public relations strategy –Write a problem statement.  Who are we trying to reach?  What will our message be?  When should we deliver our message?  Where should we target our efforts?  How do we distribute our message most effectively? Plan the strategy

18 Planning a public relations strategy –The news release  At least half the content of newspapers originates from news releases  Video news release Matching your message to the most effective medium

19 Planning a public relations strategy  Newsletters  Pamphlets, brochures and manuals  Position papers  Byliners  Op-ed pieces  Web sites Matching your message… –Other written communications

20 Planning a public relations strategy –Other interactive PR options  Speeches  News conferences  Special events  Exhibits  Lobbying Matching your message… –The media kit  Promotional material  Designed to make reporters say, “This will make a good story.”

21 Writing news releases –Newsworthy information –Clear presentation –Requires personal relationships with reporters and editors News releases provide ideas and information that become news

22 News Releases What is a news release? What is a news release? –Announcements  New line of products  Events  Promotions  Public service announcements –Cause-promoting  Fundraising  Volunteers –Image-building  Politicians  Corporations

23 Evaluating news releases Does it have news value? Does it have news value? –Local, regional or national Is it trying to gain free publicity? Is it trying to gain free publicity? Is it worth following up? Is it worth following up? –Story and/or photograph Can it be trusted? Can it be trusted?

24 Using news releases Boiling down a handout Boiling down a handout –Determine 5Ws and H –Find the lead –Eliminate fluff –Avoid free ads –Determining local news value

25 How to write a news release Avoiding hype Avoiding hype Avoiding jargon Avoiding jargon Structure of a release Structure of a release  Contact information  For Immediate Release  Dateline  Headline  Lead, inverted pyramid style copy  Quotes  Boilerplate paragraph

26 Which releases will be used? No set formula No set formula –Interests of reporters, editors –How many people affected Usually rewritten Usually rewritten –Eliminate “fluff:” self-serving, promotional info –Embarrassing if two media use exact same wording –Often raise additional questions

27 ed releases –How to write a press release How to write a press releaseHow to write a press release  Concise  Well-written  Factual  Honest  Timely

28 Writing news releases –Promote upcoming event or appearance –Convey breaking news –Announce personnel matters –Publicize a milestone Why issue a news release? –Present statistical data –Alert citizens about safety/ health issues –Update on community causes

29 Tips for writing better news releases –Use an engaging headline. –Give it a compelling lead. –Avoid distortion. –Avoid jargon. –Use proper newspaper style. 10 –Keep it crisp and tight. –Stress the benefits. –Proofread carefully. –Deliver the release at the right time. –Deliver the release to the right person.

30 Writing news releases –Customize your pitch. –Prepare yourself. When dealing with the media –Make demands. –Go off record. –Keep score. –Bribe reporters. –Be cagey or evasive. –Lie. DO:DON’T:

31 Let’s look at a UMD news release

32 Advice from PR pros Textbook: pages Textbook: pages

33 Balance, bias and media manipulations –Every source has an agenda. There are two sides to every story – who decides? –Every newsmaker has a stake in the outcome.  Rethinking  Reworking  Fact checking  Opposing viewpoints

34 Balance, bias and media manipulations –Be honest and accurate in all communications. –Act promptly to correct erroneous communications. Ethics in the practice of PR –Avoid deceptive practices.

35 Balance, bias and media manipulations –Doublespeak – language crafted to disguise, distort or evade the truth. –Euphemisms – inoffensive terms substituted for more disturbing words. Spinning the news: Common terms –Cherry-picking – selecting facts that support your argument. –Glittering generalities – vague-but-emotionally- appealing abstractions.

36 Balance, bias and media manipulations –Bridging – transitioning a question to a more comfortable topic. –Nondenial denial – criticizing the criticism. Spinning the news: Common terms –Astroturfing – creating illusion of widespread grassroots support. –Managing the news – planting questions at press conferences.

37 Chapter 8: Online Reporting –Online media offers readers more variety and control –Navigation crucial factor Electronic newspapers may replace dead-tree newspapers

38 –Online news sites From print to the Web –Traditional papers Arranging stories

39 Fulfilling the potential of new media –Need to develop new ways. –Tomorrow’s journalists will plan and produce news stories in different ways.

40 Navigating online news sites –Timeliness –Print uses large photo to catch eye; Web uses smaller image –Print uses smaller text; Web uses larger text The story as a package  Web stories can include: –Audio –Video –Links to related information –Other interactive elements

41 Key home page elements –Time/date –Index –Lead story –Page design for single-screen display –Navigation buttons –Search engine –Ads/promotions –Interactive extras –Links –Footer

42 Media convergence –Newsroom convergence  Journalists from different media share same workspace. Technological innovations transforming 21 st -century journalism –Newsgathering convergence  Reporters, editors and photographers collaborate on reports.

43 Online storytelling options –Use print to explain. –Use multimedia to show. –Use interactives to demonstrate and engage. New forms of news deliveries

44 Online storytelling options  Video  Audio  Webcams and Webcasts  Podcasts  Animated graphics  Live chats  Reader feedback and comments  Online polls and quizzes  Downloads  Archives  Other Web sites  Organizations  Editorials and columns  Additional story elements MultimediaInteractiveLinks

45 BLOGS: A way to add viewpoints –Who creates blogs?  Journalists  Participants in breaking news  Bloggers who monitor what’s new and newsworthy –Are blogs important?  Everyone has a voice But is it journalism?  Journalistic supplement

46 Writing for online media –“Chunk” your information. –Tweak your type to make it easier to scan. –Rethink what a “story” is. Tips for creating readable, user-friendly news stories for Web sites 5 –Enhance your story with extra elements. –Collaborate.

47 Writing for online media –Photocopy page 161. –Ask the team what’s this story really about.  Summarize in 25 words or less. Online package planning guide –Think like a reader. –Organize. –Distribute copies.

48

49 Final Project Eportfolio project Eportfolio project

50 Out-of-Class Assignment: Due December 6 Second draft of feature story Second draft of feature story Final Textbook Quiz! Final Textbook Quiz!

51 Community Journalism Rewrite Peer review and rewrite of community journalism stories for Web site Peer review and rewrite of community journalism stories for Web site

52 Community Journalism Review Overall excellent stories! Overall excellent stories! –You’re all good writers now – we’ll work on being stronger reporters! –Remember the basics: 5Ws and H –You might know a topic – assume this is new to the reader Need attribution Need attribution –Strongest after direct quote –,” he said, she said.  Comma inside quote marks Stick to third person: Not we, us, I, you Stick to third person: Not we, us, I, you Need quotes! Named sources! Or reads like report/opinion piece Need quotes! Named sources! Or reads like report/opinion piece Style errors: Style errors: –Dates –Months –Numerals –Need first name Several stories almost ready for publication – good job! Several stories almost ready for publication – good job!

53 With UMD men’s hockey ranked number one in the nation the Bulldogs are anxious to carry its success into the new AMSOIL Arena during its opening on Dec. 30 against its rival UND. Park point will be getting a new hotel despite neighbors’ hesitation. Spirit Mountain’s Timber Twister, a 3,200-foot- long alpine coaster that opened July 1, will continue to stay open during the upcoming winter months in the hopes of brining in more customers for the local recreation area.

54 Review of feature story drafts While doing editing/rewrite of community journalism stories While doing editing/rewrite of community journalism stories

55 Portfolio Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp


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