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Go-To Research Guide. Steps for Research Project 1.Begin with a general overview of your decade. Using the handout provided, research the decade in general.

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Presentation on theme: "Go-To Research Guide. Steps for Research Project 1.Begin with a general overview of your decade. Using the handout provided, research the decade in general."— Presentation transcript:

1 Go-To Research Guide

2 Steps for Research Project 1.Begin with a general overview of your decade. Using the handout provided, research the decade in general. Look at timelines and overviews to learn about important events in the decade. 2.Allot categories to each person in your group based on the assignment. Remember to divide up left-over categories for the “other greats considered” slide. 3.Begin looking for the specific categories you have chosen. 4.Once you’re figured out what your “great” are, it’s time to begin the real reseach! *You should have your categories chosen by the end of the hour on Friday, January 6. Over the weekend, choose your 3 “greats” as homework. Monday, January 9, when you come into class, it’s time to research your greats. *

3 Week of Research! 1.Using the handouts and books provided, plus your own searching of the internet, find sources for your three greats. While researching, check your assignment packet to make sure you’re including all of the required sources. 2.After determining that you will use a particular website/book/database, create a Source Card (in blue or black ink) for the source. Photocopy the pages of the book you using, or print out the article/webpage from the internet. Please be judicious when printing-if an article is 10 pages long, but you’re only going to use the first 2-3 pages for your project, only print the first 2-3 pages. If you don’t know how to do this, ask Mrs. Bart. 3.Staple your Source Card to the research. 4.Begin highlighting!

4 What’s up with Highlighting? Note Cards used to be the preferred method of research, but I think most of you will agree that making hundreds of cards is not particularly appealing. The highlighting method is much more practical and user-friendly. Occasionally a student prefers to make note cards; if that’s the case, ask permission, and I will allow you to create note cards instead of highlighting.

5 How/What Do I Highlight? 1. Read your printed information. Determine what portions of the pages you will use in your PowerPoint as quotes or paraphrases. 2. In one color, highlight excerpts you will quote word for word. 3. In a different color, highlight excerpts you will paraphrase. In this case, you might highlight entire paragraphs. 4. Add a key to the top of the printed material to remind you which color is for a quote and which is for a paraphrase. Keep these colors the same for all of your research.

6 Once You’re Finished… 1.Make sure every printed article has your name on it, and a Source Card stapled to it. Now, when you’re ready to start your PowerPoint, your materials are organized and you know exactly what material to put on the PowerPoint! Easy peasy! 2.You should finish roughly 2 sources a day to finish your research in the week provided. Remember, though, you also have to work independently in the library, and there will be some homework as well.

7 Tips on Performing Research Use the OWL for perfect MLA! OWL's MLA Style Guide Manual Remember, it’s not about memorizing MLA style. It’s about being able to find the information you need when you need it. Even teachers don’t have everything in MLA style memorized-but when we need it, we go to the OWL! We’re going to take some time to navigate through the OWL. If you’re absent for this, you’ll need to do this on your own. Pages of interest from the left toolbar: 1.MLA In-text Citations: The Basics 2.MLA Works Cited Page Basic Format 3.MLA Works Cited: Books 4.MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources (for web sources)

8 Guidelines you should memorize 1.You always need to cite in two places: in text, and on the Works Cited page. The Works Cited page will have the large entry with all information about the source, and the in-text, or parenthetical citations, will have a “snapshot” of the citation. Without citations in these two places, you are plagiarizing!

9 Why We Make Source Cards In a large research project, it’s quite easy to get your materials confused. Source Cards prevent us from doing this. You’re basically creating a Works Cited page while you are doing the research instead of after the paper is written. Also, by creating a Source Card and stapling it to the corresponding research, you won’t ever forget where you got certain material. It might not sound important now, but when you have sources staring at your from a Works Cited page, it’s almost impossible to remember what information came from which source. Source Cards are not a waste of time, either. After you’re done with your paper, you simply type them up and your Works Cited page is complete!

10 Source Cards For your SOURCE CARDS This EXACT information is what will appear on your Works Cited page. Just think: after your Source Cards are complete, all you have to do is type the information on your Works Cited page! Keep the top line of the card blank. Label with a letter showing the source used (A, B, C…). Staple your card to the corresponding article or pages so you don’t lose it! Write your name on each article/printout/photocopied page. Where does the information come from for the citation? MLA Guide- The OWL! Make sure to indent the second line of the citation. Write one sentence explaining what the source is about. Write the library call number for books at the bottom of the card, and the URL address for all web sources. Sample BOOK Source Card: A Bender, Lionel. Lasers in Action. New York: The Bookright Press, Print. Gives information about various medical and other uses of lasers, explains how lasers work. TA 1520.M38 – Tempe Public Library (books only) To cite this, you would do the following: For a quote: “Lasers were the perfect combination of science and technology” (Bender 62). For a paraphrase: Combining technology and science resulted in one of the most important inventions ever created: the laser (Bender 62).

11 SOURCE CARDS SOURCE CARD Keep the top line of the card blank. Label with a letter showing the source used (A, B, C…). Staple your card to the corresponding article or pages so you don’t lose it! Write your name on each article/printout/photocopied page. Where does the information come from for the citation? MLA Guide- The OWL! Make sure to indent the second line of the citation. Write one sentence explaining what the source is about. Write the URL address for all web sources at the bottom of the card. When citing this source in your PowerPoint, make sure the in-text citation matches perfectly. See textbox for example. Sample WEB Source Card w/ no author: B “Michael Jackson in Action.” Michael Jackson. 9 Sept Sony Music Publishing Company. Web. 8 January Gives information about Michael Jackson’s last tour.. The in-text citation for each source must perfectly match the Source Card/Works Cited entry. For example: “Michael Jackson’s tour was set to begin on December 9, 2010” (“Michael Jackson in Action”). Notice the quotation marks around the name of the article, which match the Source Card.

12 SOURCE CARDS SOURCE CARD Keep the top line of the card blank. Label with a letter showing the source used (A, B, C…). Staple your card to the corresponding article or pages so you don’t lose it! Write your name on each article/printout/photocopied page. Where does the information come from for the citation? MLA Guide- The OWL! Make sure to indent the second line of the citation. Write one sentence explaining what the source is about. Write the URL address for all web sources at the bottom of the card. When citing this source in your PowerPoint, make sure the in-text citation matches perfectly. See textbox for example. Sample WEB Source Card w/ no author: B “Michael Jackson in Action.” Michael Jackson. 9 Sept Sony Music Publishing Company. Web. 8 January Gives information about Michael Jackson’s last tour.. If you have several citations which start with the same few words, (i.e., “Michael Jackson), create your own differentiation. For example: “Michael Jackson’s tour was set to begin on December 9, 2010” (“Jackson in Action”). Remember, the period always comes AFTER the citation.

13 SOURCE CARDS SOURCE CARD Keep the top line of the card blank. Label with a letter showing the source used (A, B, C…). Staple your card to the corresponding article or pages so you don’t lose it! Write your name on each article/printout/photocopied page. Where does the information come from for the citation? MLA Guide- The OWL! Make sure to indent the second line of the citation. Write one sentence explaining what the source is about. Write the URL address for all web sources at the bottom of the card. When citing this source in your PowerPoint, make sure the in-text citation matches perfectly. See textbox for example. Sample WEB Source Card w/ no author: B “Michael Jackson in Action.” Michael Jackson. 9 Sept Sony Music Publishing Company. Web. 8 January Gives information about Michael Jackson’s last tour.. A paraphrase would be cited in the exact same manner. For example: Had Jackson not died, his tour would have commenced on December 9, 2010 (“Jackson in Action”). Paraphrases put information in your own words. You still need to cite this information!!!

14 Images Works Cited Image Entries An image is cited in the exact same manner as text, but instead of the word “Web” or “Print,” you would write “Online Image.” That’s the only difference in citing an image! Next to, or under, the image, include the citation. The citation will look exactly the same as text citations, but you don’t have to use parenthesis. Sample WEB Image Source w/ no author: “Michael Jackson in Action.” Michael Jackson. 9 Sept Sony Music Publishing Company. Online Image. 8 January . “Jackson in Action”

15 Merging PowerPoints Open all PowerPoints on a computer. You will see several tabs at the bottom of the screen. Open the PowerPoint you wish to copy from. On the left hand side bar, “Select All,” or “Control A.” The slides will all turn orange to indicate they have been copied. Click on the slides and don’t let go of the mouse. Drag the slides down to the tab of the PowerPoint you wish to copy into. Once the PowerPoint in question opens, release the mouse in the left hand side bar. The slides will all appear! A little clipboard will appear somewhere on the screen. Click it and a drop-down menu will appear. Click on “Match Destination Formatting” or “Keep destination formatting” and all of your pictures, fonts, and backgrounds will appear. You’re done! It’s that easy! To change the order of the slides, just click and drag!

16 A Common Question Q: I’m working really hard on this project. How do I make sure I get a good grade? A: See Mrs. Bart every day before or after school, or during class, to make sure you’re doing the work correctly. Don’t wait until the night before the project is due to ask if it’s done properly. her your project and ask her to look at it

17 Common Problems 1.No in-text citations despite Mrs. Bart telling you a thousand times that you need them. When in doubt, CITE. Remember, every piece of information that isn’t common knowledge must be cited. 2.In-text citations don’t match Works Cited page. 3.Failure to follow project guidelines. A big part of success on ANY project is following directions. 4.Waiting until the last minute to complete portions of the project, tell me about a problem with a group member, or to get help.

18 Get a Good Grade! Avoid that feeling you get when papers get passed back. You know, when you think you did pretty well, and you put a lot of time into the project, only to see….a C… D… An F. What?? If you’re going to work hard, work smart! Bug me with questions. me every day. Come in before or after school. Do whatever it takes! When we read over project guidelines, highlight portions of the instructions you feel important. Write questions for the teacher and ask them after the lesson. Write all over your research packet-that’s what it’s there for! Keep all materials in your designated research folder, and keep them paper-clipped and organized. Organization saves a LOT of time. Plan ahead! You are all busy with other classes, sports, extra-curricular obligations, jobs, and family obligations. Manage your time by scheduling work on the project.


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