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ESSAY EXERCISE 1. Q: ‘One must look to the past to create the future. ’ Discuss this statement with reference to artists and their work.

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Presentation on theme: "ESSAY EXERCISE 1. Q: ‘One must look to the past to create the future. ’ Discuss this statement with reference to artists and their work."— Presentation transcript:

1 ESSAY EXERCISE 1. Q: ‘One must look to the past to create the future. ’ Discuss this statement with reference to artists and their work.

2 It was during this Renaissance period that the idea of both linear and atmospheric perspective in Painting developed. Piero Della Francesca, ( Italian,1415 – 1492) The Flagellation of Christ,1455, Oil and tempera on panel, 59 x 82 cm

3 Manet ( French ) Olympia, 1863, oil on canvas, 131 cm × 190 cm) Execution of Maximilian, 1868.

4 Marcel Duchamp (France 1887 – 1968) Nude descending a staircase No. 2, 1912, oil on canvas, 147 x 89cm Juan Gris, (Spanish, 1887 – 1927) Breakfast, 1914, collage, crayon and oil on canvas, 80 x 59cm. Picasso, Still life with chair caning, 1912.

5 Jackson Pollock, No 11 (Blue Poles), 1952, 212 x 488cm, paint and glass on canvas. Mark Rothko, Untitled, oil on canvas, 207 X 167cm, 1949.

6 Photography – changes everything. Nadar, portrait of Edourard Manet, 1870

7 Traditionally art had a moral purpose. History subjects were used –Bible stories or Myths or ancient heroic figures. Alessandro Moretto, (Italy, 1478 /1518 –1554) Christ and the woman of Samaria, oil on canvas, 38 x 31cm

8 Edgar Degas, The Dance Class 1875 Degas, Waiting, 1882 Daumier, The Laundress, ? 1863

9 Gustave Courbet, Burial at Ornans, Stonebreakers,

10 Examples of Friezes. Courbet used the Style of the Frieze in his Burial at Ornans To indicate that the funeral was an Important subject even though it was A contemporary one, not a history Subject.

11 Tom Roberts, Shearing the Rams, 1890 Arthur Streeton, Fire’s on!, 1891.

12 Claude Monet, Woman with a parasol, 1875

13 Fernand Khnopff (Belgian,1858 – 1921) The caresses, 1896, oil on canvas, 51 x 151cm Not all 19 th century art was interested in contemporary culture…

14 Gustave Moreau (French, 1826 – 1898) The Apparition, 1876, watercolour on paper, 105 x 72cm

15 Kathe Kollwitz, (German ), Woman with dead child, 1903 etching, 42 x 48cm, Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863 – 1944) The Scream, 1893, oil, tempera & pastel on canvas, 91 x 74cm.

16 Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Portrait of a sick man, 1918 Enst Ludwig Kirchner, Self Portrait,, 1920

17 Otto Dix, Card-playing war cripples, 1920 Otto Dix (Germany 1891 – 1969) Der Krieg, (The War), Plate 6 of 50, 1924, etching & aquatint 20 x 29cm

18 Hugo Ball at Café Voltaire with his nonsense poem And his nonsense costume, 1916 Max Ernst, Little machine constructed by Minimax Dadamax in person, pencil & ink frottage, watercolour, gouache,

19 Hans Arp, Collage with squares arranged according to the laws of chance, collage, 48 x 35cm, Hans Arp, Automatic drawing, ink on paper, 42 x 54cm, c. 1917

20 Rene Magritte, (Belgian, ) The False Mirror, oil on canvas, 1928, 54 x 80cm Victor Brauner, (Romania, ) Loup- table (Wolf-table), table and fox parts,

21 Games of chance (as in Dada) were also used extensively by the Surrealist group.. Exquisite Corpse was a game where someone draws something or writes something, then folds over the paper and passes it to the next person, who can’t see what has been done, but must create something. Then they fold their bit over, and so on. The total sum of the image is a collaboration by the group who couldn’t see each others work Andre Breton, Tristan Tzara, & Greta Knutson, Landscape: exquisite corpse, c. 1933, coloured pencil on paper, 24 x 31cm

22 Jackson Pollock, No 11 (Blue Poles), 1952, 212 x 488cm, paint and glass on canvas. Mark Rothko, Untitled, oil on canvas, 207 X 167cm, 1949.

23 Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (French, 1780 – 1867 ) The Valpincon Bather, 1808, Oil on canvas, 146 cm × 97 cm Jaques-Louis David (French,1748 – 1825) The oath of the Horatii, 1784, oil on canvas, 326 x 420cm

24 Antonio Canova (Italy, ) The Three Graces, marble, c. 1815, 173 X 97 X 57 cm.

25 Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917), Little dancer of 14 years, originally wax with clothes, , approx. 108cm,cast in bronze in about 1921 after his death.

26 Auguste Renoir (French, ) Luncheon of the boating party, , oil on canvas, 130 x 176cm Claude Monet, Impression: Sunrise, 1872

27 Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Portrait of a sick man, 1918 Enst Ludwig Kirchner, Self Portrait with Model, 1920

28 Kathe Kollwitz, (German ), Woman with dead child, 1903 etching, 42 x 48cm, Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863 – 1944) The Scream, 1893, oil, tempera & pastel on canvas, 91 x 74cm.

29 The persistence of memory, 1931, oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm Salvador Dali, Soft self-portrait with bacon, 1941, oil on canvas, 61 x 51cm

30 Willem de Kooning (U.S ),Pink Angels. c Oil and charcoal on canvas, 132 x 102 cm. Woman V,

31 Kathe Kollwitz (German ) Death seizes a woman, 1924 The Widow, woodcut, 1922.

32 Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863 – 1944) Madonna, Self-portrait,

33 Mark Rothko, 1957 # 20, 1957

34 Juan Gris, (Spanish, 1887 – 1927) Breakfast, 1914, collage, crayon and oil on canvas, 80 x 59cm. Picasso, Still life with chair caning, 1912.

35 Hannah Hoch (German, ) Love, photomontage, 1931

36 Raoul Hausmann, (Austrian, ) The spirit of our time, assemblage, 33cm high, 1921 Pablo Picasso, Guitar 1914 Guitar, 1912

37 Andy Warhol, Marilyn, screenprint series based on newspaper image, 1967 Big electric chair, 1971 screen print Based on newspaper image. From last session….Screen printing: wEE

38 Roy Lichtenstein, Crying Girl, 1962, painting based on comic book image.

39 Jackson Pollock used new materials within his artworks – liquid paints; house paints, broken glass; sand. Also the techniques he used to apply the paint were new: hardened brushes; sticks; turkey-baster syringes; and famously, DRIPPING the paint from the can onto the canvas, which was outrageous at the time. He took his paintings down from the easel and laid the canvas on the floor. This meant he could approach the canvas from any direction and use his body in new ways. He felt he ‘entered into’ the painting. This was a huge break with Western tradition. Jackson Pollock, No 11 (Blue Poles), 1952, 212 x 488cm, paint and glass on canvas.

40 Rosalie Gascoigne (NZ.1917 – 1999) Poplars 19, , linoleum on painted wood with retro-reflective strip,60 × 62cm. A photo of poplars. Rosalie Gascoigne,(NZ.1917 – 1999) Suddenly the lake, 1995, formboard plywoods, galvanised iron sheeting, acrylic paint on composition board; four panels overall (approx.) 131 x 361 x 8 cm

41 No. 753, 1989 RK982, Robert Klippel (Aust ) Australian sculptor. Used found objects and rubbish to create his earlier works; later works were in bronze but LOOKED as though They were created out of found objects. These works are not OF anything. They are Just objects in themselves – note the titles, Deliberately not telling any story about the work. Some Ab Ex work was like this. Drawing, 1950

42 Joseph Kosuth, Art as idea as idea (water), Photocopy on board, 1966.

43 Barbara Kruger, You invest in the divinity of the masterpiece, 1982, photocopy. Barbara Kruger, I shop therefore I am, 1980s, photocopy.

44 Marie Mcmahon, Pay the Rent, screenpint Poster, Guerrilla Girls Public Service Announcement, 1980s, poster

45

46 John Baldessari, (US b. 1931) I will not make any more boring art, lithograph, 1971, 57 x 76cm Piero Manzoni (Italian, ) Artist’s Shit no. 14, 1961,

47 Yoko Ono, Cut Piece, 1965 Jill Orr, Bleeding Trees, performance 1979


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