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All teachers, but especially new ones, can struggle with time management. Teachers have difficulty determining how long a particular lesson will take,

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Presentation on theme: "All teachers, but especially new ones, can struggle with time management. Teachers have difficulty determining how long a particular lesson will take,"— Presentation transcript:

1 All teachers, but especially new ones, can struggle with time management. Teachers have difficulty determining how long a particular lesson will take, and how and when to find time outside of the school day to plan lesson and tend to paperwork, as well as have some semblance of a life outside the confine of their classroom.

2 “There’s not enough hours in the day” Find what works best for you. It may entail arriving early or staying late. Find a time where you can work uninterrupted ALONE. For example, you may have to work on the weekends, before an event such as a game, concert, meeting, etc. Be sure to use uour time wisely. Don’t bring papers to the faculty room to grade. Stay in your room and close the door. Always remember how to eat an elephant…….one bite at a time.!

3 We hear far too many misconceptions that teachers have it made. We work 7 hours a day, weekends and summers off, and vacations throughout the year. It’s a cake job Television only adds to the misconception by glorifying the profession.  Understand that teaching is one of the most demanding of all professions, but also one of the most rewarding.  Realize teaching is hard work. It can be tough at times and even the most veteran teachers will stumble and fall.  Teachers entering the profession need to grasp the concept of what’s required of them. The reward outweighs the demands!

4 Don’t procrastinate. Stay on top of things. The school year keeps going even if you choose to stop. Lessons need planned, papers need graded, paperwork needs to be tended to. Don’t put it off, chip away at it. Better to be on top of your workload than to have your workload on top of you.

5 “If you’re failing to plan, you’re planning to fail!” -Harry Wong  Students will know when you’re “winging” it. They’ll see it and will respond to the lack of structure accordingly.  Poorly planned lessons result in behavior problems, off task students, and general confusion.  In order for the kids to learn a new skill, the lesson needs to well thought out and well taught.  Planning takes time, but when done properly, most of your work is done. Then you can have fun and enjoy teaching the lesson.  Mentors can play a big role in the planning needs of new teachers. They possess the skill and guidance in planning new lessons. Remember: Coaches go into games with structured game plans, surgeons go into surgery with structured plans and attorneys go to court with detailed plans to defend their clients. We should expect the same of educators!

6 Have an organized room. A room that is laid out for you to work efficiently. Know where everything is and where it goes  Where do students turn in homework  Lost & found  Supplies (pencils, paper, calculators, rulers, etc.)  Assignment sheets  Location for binders  Absence area Stay on top of photocopy requests, IEP’s, plan books, communication with parents Kids will mimic organization!

7 Without question it is the hardest part of the job (CYA means “See ya”)  Parent portal  Phone log  folder for parent contacts  Web page  Portfolios of student work, behavior issues, along with comments  Keep track in your own plan book as well. Records that will assist you in future years. Record things like, school closings (weather), ½ days, assemblies, etc. Keep track of what worked and didn’t work within your own units. Do it in the moment, be reflective then because you won’t remember how it went when you’re looking at it the following year.

8  Know your grade level and the vocabulary that’s associated with it. Don’t use big words that’ll confuse kids and don’t use simpler terms that will patronize higher end kids. If you know where you’re going, you’re much more likely to get there.  Provide a “real world” link – it avoids the “why do we have to know this?” comment

9 Provide thorough substitute plans. Write them thoroughly and effectively. Assume that the person coming in for you knows nothing about how to teach the topic being covered. Create an emergency folder. It should include…  “Busy Work” Lesson  Seating Chart  Emergency Procedures (lock down, fire drill, hold in place, etc.) Any qualified and competent teacher “hates” being out of their classroom. Unfortunately, we’re not super human. We get sick, our children get ill, we’re called out on in-service training, or we just need a day off to tend to non-school related matters. Life does get in the way of teaching! If you know you’re going to be out, don’t be afraid to let the kids know you’ll be out, and more importantly…..YOU’LL BE BACK!


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