Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© 2009 Wilson Publishing 1 Press Spacebar or down arrow to continue.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© 2009 Wilson Publishing 1 Press Spacebar or down arrow to continue."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 1 Press Spacebar or down arrow to continue

2  Congratulations! You have purchased a FunArtLessons.com Art Unit.  To view and print this document :  If you have Microsoft PowerPoint installed on your computer then you are viewing this page in design mode. From the menu bar at the top of the window select View Slideshow. To print this unit as a booklet, click on the office button (PPTX 2007) or File Print (PPT 2003) and select print. If you do not have Microsoft PowerPoint installed on your computer then you are viewing this document using PowerPoint Viewer. Use the space bar or arrow keys to advance through the slides. To print, hold down the command key while pressing the P key. This will open your print dialogue box. To exit PowerPoint Viewer press Esc key. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 2

3 A FunArtLessons.com ART UNIT By Kari Wilson © 2009 Wilson Publishing 3 Fins, Feathers and Fur Linocut Printmaking An art unit appropriate for students age 8-16 in art classes, scout troops, recreation classes, after school clubs, independent study, home school settings

4 Included in this PowerPoint Teacher SectionStudent Section begins on page 20 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 4  About the Author  FunArtLessons.com Art unit components  How to use this Power Point: book or slideshow  National Standards  I Can Statements: learning goals and objectives  Lesson Sequence Chart  Materials List  Art Words vocabulary  Student Gallery  “I Can” statements*  Guiding Question  Project Description  Journal Response Topics  Research Task*  Art Start activities  Project Directions  Assessment Guide*  Self-Critique*  Artist’s Statement* *Copy master included.

5 About the Author © 2009 Wilson Publishing 5 Kari Wilson has been an educator for over twenty years, teaching first through sixth grades as well as middle school language arts and social studies. Her current passion is teaching art at a public middle school in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Kari's own education includes a Bachelor of Fine Arts from San Francisco State University, a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Arizona, and a Master of Education, along with teaching credentials. Kari stepped out of the classroom for several years to serve as a Curriculum Associate in a large California school district, where she developed a variety of programs from “Back to School with Basic Health and Safety” to “The Achievement Club,” a program designed to help struggling readers. This program received the Golden Bell award from the California School Boards Association. As a member of the California History Social Science Project (CHSSP), Kari was involved in the development and implementation of numerous social studies units. Kari’s unit, Child Work in Colonial Days, was published by the UCLA branch of CHSSP. Kari has continued exploring her interest in history as a recent participant in a Gilder Lehrman summer institute at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, where she engaged in research for the development of a series of civics lessons which include integrated art activities. These lessons on the Core Democratic Values, as well as her other curriculum units for preschool through 10th grade, are available online at FunLessonplans.com, a companion site to FunArtLessons.com.

6 FunArtLessons Art Unit Components © 2009 Wilson Publishing 6 Guiding Question The guiding question provides “food for thought” to help connect the project to a larger philosophical discussion. Journal Response Topics Students write responses in their sketchbooks and share with partners and group mates. This process helps enrich class discussion and helps students plan their project. Art Start Art Start is a series of independent activities which provide exercise in basic art skills and concepts needed for the unit project. Students work independently in their sketchbook the first minutes of class. Research The research component encourages students to explore cultural, historical and environmental connections between the unit project and the world beyond the classroom. The Project Slides provide step-by-step instructions. During project work days demonstrate additional skills or methods as they become necessary. The Lesson Sequence chart provides a basic time frame for the project. During project work days circulate assisting students with methods, techniques and ideas. Assessment Use the “I Can” slide and worksheet to help students track their learning. Use the Interactive Assessment Guide to engage students in analyzing the ways in which their art and work habits meet the project criteria. The self-critique questions ask the artist to reflect on the art-making process. Answers can be rewritten on the form provided to create an Artist’s Statement. Exhibition It is important for students to have the opportunity to display their work to complete the process of communication in which artists are engaged. Instructions are provided for students to create a gallery information card, write an artist’s statement and find an appropriate venue for display.

7 How to use this PowerPoint: Book or Slideshow Use this document as a book, a slideshow, or both, depending on your resources. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 7 If you have a computer and digital projector in your classroom: Read the Teacher Section directly on the computer screen as you plan your lessons. Then, display the Student Section ArtStart sketchbook activities and step-by-step project instructions as a slideshow for your class. Print out only the student worksheets, as needed. If you do not have a digital projector in your classroom: Read the Teacher Section on the computer screen as you plan your lessons. Photocopy Student Section pages to use as hand-outs. Use the step-by-step project instructions to plan the project and guide your demonstrations. If you do not have a computer in your classroom: Print entire document and use as you would any hard-copy, teacher resource publication. Make photocopies of Student Section pages to use as handouts.

8 This Lesson Meets National Standards This lesson addresses the following standards established by the National Art Education Association: © 2009 Wilson Publishing 8 Content StandardAchievement Standard Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes Students intentionally take advantage of the qualities and characteristics of art media, techniques, and processes to enhance communication of their experiences and ideas. Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others Students describe and place a variety of art objects in historical and cultural contexts. Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures Students analyze, describe, and demonstrate how factors of time and place (such as climate, resources, ideas, and technology) influence visual characteristics that give meaning and value to a work of art

9 What Your Students Will Learn Your students will learn about art, themselves and the world in this unit. They will also have fun! The “I Can” statements are a kid friendly way of presenting the learning goals and objectives of this unit, all of which have been aligned with the National Art Education Association Standards. Have students write each “I Can” statement in their sketchbooks as they gain new skills. Or, photocopy the “I Can” statements check-off sheet in the student section so that students can track their progress. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 9 I can: Use the characteristics and processes of linocut printmaking to successfully express my ideas. Describe the characteristics of the “Die Br ü cke” art movement. Explain how and why linocut methods developed out of other printmaking technologies.

10 Lesson Sequence © 2009 Wilson Publishing 10 Day 1Day 2Day 3Day 4Day 5 Slides Introduce project Discuss Guiding Question Introduce vocabulary Journal Response 1 Art Start 1 Slides Art Start 2 Research Share research in small groups Slide 31 Art Start 3 Slides Show student gallery images as time allows. Slide 32 Journal Response 2 Slides Draw animal

11 Lesson Sequence © 2009 Wilson Publishing 11 Day 6Day 7Day 8Day 9Day 10 Slide Demonstrate carving linoleum Begin Carving Work on carving Slide 41 Demonstrate Printing Make Prints Slides Finish printing Make Gallery Cards Fill out Assessment Guide Slides Display prints Fill out Self- Critique Rewrite self- critique on form as an Artist’s Statement for display

12 Materials and Equipment © 2009 Wilson Publishing 12 Drawing materials: markers, pencils, pen and ink Sketchbooks Books and magazines with pictures of animals Printmaking supplies: Linoleum block or sheet or styro foam trays or plates. Carving handles and blades Brayers and ink

13 Art Words Introduce vocabulary as you begin the project. Reinforce terms during Art Start activities. Invite students to write vocabulary words and definitions in their sketchbook. Encourage students to use Art Words as they answer journal responses and discuss art work. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 13 Line a mark characterized by length as in the path made by a moving point Texture The way a surface feels to the touch or the way it looks such as bumpy or smooth. Variety A principle of design. Visual interest is created when elements such as shape, or color shift or change in relation to themselves. Space The distances or area around, between or within components of an artwork including: Negative space is the empty space around or within an object or form; also called white space. Positive space is filled with something such as line, color, or shape. Linocut A relief printmaking process whereby a design is cut or carved into a linoleum surface. The raised areas are inked with a brayer and can be printed multiple times. Die Br ü cke An art movement in Germany from Die Brucke means “the bridge.” Members intended to form a bridge between traditional and modern art styles. They invented the linoleum printmaking process.

14 Student Gallery © 2009 Wilson Publishing 14

15 Kaleidoscope of Giraffes © 2009 Wilson Publishing 15

16 Golden Dog © 2009 Wilson Publishing 16

17 Furry Bear © 2009 Wilson Publishing 17

18 Patriot Bird © 2009 Wilson Publishing 18

19 Red Hot Cat © 2009 Wilson Publishing 19

20 Student Section © 2009 Wilson Publishing 20 Fins, Feathers and Fur Linocut printmaking

21 What You Will Learn You will learn about art, yourself and the world in this unit. You will also have fun! Write each “I Can” statement in your sketchbook as you gain new skills. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 21 I can: Use the characteristics and processes of linocut printmaking to successfully express my ideas. Describe the characteristics of the “Die Br ü cke” art movement. Explain how and why linocut methods developed out of other printmaking technologies.

22 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 22 Name Fins, Feathers and Fur What You Will Learn Directions: You will learn about art, yourself and the world in this unit. You will also have fun! Check off each “I Can” statement as you gain new skills. I can:  Use the characteristics and processes of linocut printmaking to successfully express my ideas.  Describe the characteristics of the “Die Br ü cke” art movement.  Explain how and why linocut methods developed out of other printmaking technologies.

23 Art Words Write vocabulary words and definitions in your sketchbook. Use Art Words as you answer journal responses an discuss art work. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 23 Line a mark characterized by length as in the path made by a moving point Texture The way a surface feels to the touch or looks such as bumpy or smooth. Variety A principle of design - interest is created when elements such as shape, or color shift or change in relation to themselves. Space The distances or area around, between or within components of an artwork Linocut A relief printing process where a design is carved into linoleum. The raised areas are inked and can be printed multiple times. Die Br ü cke An art movement in Germany from Die Brucke means “the bridge.” Members intended to form a bridge between traditional and modern art styles. They invented the linoleum printmaking process.

24 Guiding Question How has technology influenced the way images are used? © 2009 Wilson Publishing 24

25 Journal Response #1 How do you use (make or experience) images in your everyday life? © 2009 Wilson Publishing 25

26 Use different types of line to show the texture in fins, feathers or fur, in a series of prints of an animal, real or imagined. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 26 The Project Make Linocut Prints

27 Art Start 1 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 27 Experiment with stamp printing. Gather objects such as small bottle lids, corrugated cardboard or foam packing pellets. Press into a thin layer of tempera paint and stamp a design. See if you can make an animal or print your name.

28 Art Start 2 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 28 Notice how Albrecht D ü rer created different textures on the rhinoceros's hide with different types of lines. What do you think the lower legs feel like compared with his chin? Make a pencil sketch of a reptile such as a lizard, turtle or crocodile. Use lines to show texture on the skin. Feel free to borrow from this D ü rer print. Albrecht D ü rer, Rhinoceros, 1515, woodcut print

29 Find out About Linocut and Die Br ü cke Go to and Search Die Brucke.http://www.bruecke-museum.de/english.htmwww.wikipedia.org © 2009 Wilson Publishing 29 Who are some of the members of Die Brücke? Why did they invent the linocut printmaking method? What are three characteristics of the “Die Brücke” art style?

30 Find out About Linocut and Die Br ü cke Go to and Search Die Brucke.http://www.bruecke-museum.de/english.htmwww.wikipedia.org © 2009 Wilson Publishing 30 Who are some of the members of Die Brücke? Why did they form this group? Why did they invent the linocut printmaking method? What are three characteristics of the “Die Brücke” art style? Name

31 Art Start 3 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 31 Fold a long, horizontal piece of paper into fourths so that just one section is shown at a time. If possible use a four foot length of butcher paper or chart paper. Work with the paper so that when you are finished it will unfold horizontally. Group members take turns drawing the following animal parts in each box, folding the paper over so that the next person does not see the drawings: 1. Head 2. First section of body 3. Second section of body 4. Tail

32 Journal Response 2 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 32 The “Die Br ü cke” artists wanted to break with traditional, realistic style in their artwork in order to emphasize self expression. Look at this woodcut print, “The Prophet,” 1912, by Emile Nolde. Do you think it is good art? Why or why not?

33 Let’s Get Started on the Art Project Follow the steps outlined in the next few slides to create your own linocut animal prints. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 33

34 Step One plan your design © 2009 Wilson Publishing 34 Choose an animal real or imagined that you would like to draw. Cut paper the size of the linoleum you will use. Plan your drawing carefully so that you include texture lines and marks to show the fins, feather or fur. Read the next slide for helpful hints.

35 Step Two Helpful hints © 2009 Wilson Publishing 35 Remember: your design will print backwards! The parts you cut away will not print. If you want a line or shape to print it must be in “relief” – not the part cut away! Use a variety of lines to create texture.

36 Step Three Safety Demonstration © 2009 Wilson Publishing 36 Before you begin, watch a demonstration by your teacher. Be sure to follow safety rules! 1. Always use a bench hook. 2. Keep your “holding hand” out of the path of the carving tool. 3. Always cut away from your body: Turn your linoleum, do not move your hand to the front of your linoleum! 4. Remind others if you see them forgetting the rules.

37 Step Four Copy drawing © 2009 Wilson Publishing 37 Copy your drawing onto the linoleum. To transfer your drawing easily 1. Rub pencil all over the back side of your drawing paper. 2. Place the pencil side down on your carving surface so that your original animal drawing is facing up. 3. Lightly trace over the lines of your drawing. 4. Lift your paper off the linoleum and you should see the light lines of your drawing. 5. Redo any lines which are too light.

38 Step Five Carve © 2009 Wilson Publishing 38 Set up your bench hook so that the wooden strip on the bottom rests firmly against the edge of your table. Gather several different cutting tools from a fine to a large size. Begin by carving the contour line of your animal with a medium wide blade.

39 Step Six Carve your design © 2009 Wilson Publishing 39 Carve details such as eyes, mouth, teeth and claws. Use a variety of blades to carve lines and marks to show the texture of the fins, feathers or fur of your animal.

40 Step Seven Get ready to print © 2009 Wilson Publishing 40 Gather newspaper, ink, brayers and inking boards such as a plastic lunch tray, or styro foam plate. Set up a station for each different color you want to use. Change the newspaper after each person so that ink doesn’t get on clean paper.

41 Step Eight Inking © 2009 Wilson Publishing 41 Put a grape-sized dollop of ink on the board. Roll the brayer horizontally and vertically, just the width of the brayer to evenly ink the roller. Roll the ink in both directions over your linocut until it is spread evenly and completely covered.

42 Step Nine Make a test print © 2009 Wilson Publishing 42 Place your inked “plate” or linocut face up on clean newspaper. Carefully set your printing paper on top of the inked plate. While holding the paper and plate with one hand, gently rub with the heel of your hand all over the paper. Do not use your finder tips as this can cause the paper to sink into cut away portions of the plate. To remove your print carefully peel it off the plate. Examine your print and recarve where necessary to get the effect your want.

43 Step Ten Final printing © 2009 Wilson Publishing 43 Make at least four prints. Be sure to rinse your printing plate when you change ink colors. Experiment with color: Print twice on one piece of paper in two different colors. Off set your plate slightly so both colors show. Ink different parts of the plate with different colors. Use different colored papers. Place prints on a shelf or rack to dry. Do not overlap!

44 Finishing © 2009 Wilson Publishing 44 If you like, choose a print to mount on mat board or construction paper. Display your artwork in a hallway or the refrigerator door at home!

45 Make a Gallery Card Directions: Make a gallery card to put next to your prints in a display case or bulletin board. Fold an unlined index card or piece of card stock in half so that it will stand up like a tent. Write the following information on your gallery card in dark or colorful marker. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 45 Title Artist’s Name Medium (materials you used in your art) Date

46 Interactive Assessment Guide Directions: For each category where you feel you have earned a 1 or 2 make notes in the boxes to explain why. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 46 Fins, Feather and Fur Animal Prints 3 Wow! All Criteria Met 2 Good Job! Most Criteria Met 1 Keep Trying! Some Criteria Met Sketchbook I Completed 3 Art Start activities with care and attention to detail. I Completed journal response 1 & 2 thoughtfully and neatly. Animal Print Design I used a variety of lines and marks to show texture in fins, feather or fur. I include additional details in my animal. Craftsmanship I made four prints in a variety of colors. My prints are free of finger prints or stray ink. The carving was deep enough to print well. Effort I always used class time wisely. I completed each part of the assignment to the best of my ability. Citizenship I was careful with supplies and equipment. I cleaned up after myself and helped others. My attitude was enthusiastic and respectful.

47 Interactive Assessment Guide Name Directions: For each category where you feel you have earned a 1 or 2 make notes in the boxes to explain why. © 2009 Wilson Publishing 47 Fins, Feather and Fur Animal Prints 3 Wow! All Criteria Met 2 Good Job! Most Criteria Met 1 Keep Trying! Some Criteria Met Sketchbook I Completed 3 Art Start activities with care and attention to detail. I Completed journal response 1 & 2 thoughtfully and neatly. Animal Print Design I used a variety of lines and marks to show texture in fins, feather or fur. I include additional details in my animal. Craftsmanship I made four prints in a variety of colors. My prints are free of finger prints or stray ink. The carving was deep enough to print well. Effort I always used class time wisely. I completed each part of the assignment to the best of my ability. Citizenship I was careful with supplies and equipment. I cleaned up after myself and helped others. My attitude was enthusiastic and respectful.

48 Art Self-Critique (Kri-teek: to discuss a creative work giving an assessment of its successful qualities.) © 2009 Wilson Publishing 48 Directions: Look carefully at YOUR work of art. Answer each question in complete sentences. Use four vocabulary terms: linocut, texture, variety, space. Circle each term you use. 1. Describe your artwork. Tell about the materials you used, include information about texture, variety and space. 2. What are some of the challenges you faced in making your linocut? What did you learn from this project? 3. Choose an element or principle of art that is used successfully. How has it contributed to your artwork?

49 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 49 Directions: Look carefully at YOUR work of art. Answer each question in complete sentences. Use 4 vocabulary terms: linocut, texture, variety, space.. Circle each term you use. 1. Describe your artwork. Tell about the materials you used, describe details such as texture, variety and space. 2. What are some of the challenges you faced in completing your linocut? What did you learn from this project? 3. Choose an element or principle of art that is used successfully. How has it contributed to your artwork? Name Art Self-Critique (Kri teek: to discuss a creative work, giving an assessment of its successful qualities.)

50 © 2009 Wilson Publishing 50 Artist’s Statement by

51 The End Thank you for using this FunArtLessons.com Art Unit! © 2009 Wilson Publishing 51


Download ppt "© 2009 Wilson Publishing 1 Press Spacebar or down arrow to continue."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google