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Beginning Teachers’ Conference September 2014 Creating Meaningful & Functional Individualized Program Plans Special.

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Presentation on theme: "Beginning Teachers’ Conference September 2014 Creating Meaningful & Functional Individualized Program Plans Special."— Presentation transcript:

1 Beginning Teachers’ Conference September 2014 Creating Meaningful & Functional Individualized Program Plans Special Education Council

2 Our Session Agenda Special Education Council’s website Individualized Program Plan binder Review the essential components of IPPs Writing SMART goals and objectives Share contact information

3 Parental Input  Parental involvement is documented (including meetings)  IPP is signed or attempts to obtain parent signature to indicate informed consent are documented Example September 12, Meeting with parents and teacher to discuss planning for the upcoming school year and to gather information on student strengths and areas of need.

4 Appendix 2-A Sample Parent Survey Name Date Parent’s Name The following questions are designed to help your child’s learning team begin the Individualized Program Planning (IPP) process. We value your input and invite you to think about the following questions in preparation for the learning team meeting. 1.What are your child’s strengths and interests? 2.Describe successes your child had in school. 3.Describe any challenges your child had in school. 4.What are your child’s learning needs for this school year? (These could be skills that your child needs to acquire or improve on.) 5.What type of learner is your child? How does your child learn best? 6.Does your child display any behaviours that are of concern to you? If so, please explain how you deal with this type of behaviour at home. 7.What are your goals and hopes for your child this year? 8.Where do you see your child five years from now? 9.Is there any other information that could help us gain a better understanding of your child? 10.Are there any specific concerns that you would like us to address at this meeting? If so, please explain. Thank you for sharing your ideas.

5 Strengths and Areas of Need Strengths  Academic, social, emotional, behavioural or physical areas that positively impact learning  Input from parents  Input from student Example: Works well in small groups Prefers to share learning in written form Areas of Need  Academic, social, emotional, behavioural or physical areas that negatively impact learning  Needs are expressed in positive terms  Input from parents  Input from student Example: Improved expressive language Increased focus and attention

6 Medical Information Relevant to Learning  Medical diagnosis  Medications  Other conditions that impact schooling  No medical information that impacts schooling

7 Assessment Data (Specialized Assessment Results)  Current specialized assessments: name of assessment tool and date administered  Name of specialist and area of specialization  Summary of report findings Concisely and briefly – NO percentiles or numerical values. This are available in formal reports for reference.

8 Current Level of Performance and Achievement (Classroom and Informal Assessments)  Student’s current level of functioning or level of achievement  Current pre- and post-classroom assessments: name of tool and date administered  Summary of findings Include information on previous year and current year. At the end of the year, delete the previous year’s information.

9 Coordinated Support Services  Support services offered within the school  Support services offered outside the school  Amount of time services offered

10 Instructional Accommodations  Individualized instructional accommodations and strategies (e.g., unique expectations, specialized materials, resources, facilities, equipment, assistive technology, personnel)  Aligned with personal strengths, areas for growth and goal statements Instructional accommodations and strategies should highlight all of the specific strategies that are in place for the student. Check out the websites on specialeducation.ab.ca resource page for a variety of recommended strategies.

11 Appendix 6-A Sample General Accommodations Name Date Completed by Environmental  Seat student near teacher  Seat student in an area with minimal distractions  Seat student near a positive peer model  Stand near student when giving instructions  Provide access to study carrel  Use a desktop easel or slant board to raise reading materials  Allow student to move around the classroom  Modify text materials by adding, adapting or substituting information  Make materials self-correcting  Highlight important concepts and information and/or passages  Prepare recordings of reading/textbook materials, tasks  Provide an extra textbook for home use  Provide graph paper or large spaced paper for writing  Allow use of personal word lists, cue cards  Increase use of pictures, diagrams, concrete manipulators  Increase print size in photocopying  Provide a visual summary of the daily schedule  Other

12 Sample Academic and Instructional Accommodations Name Date Completed by ____________ Reading Difficulties Written Expression DifficultiesFine and Gross Motor Difficulties  Use less difficult/alternative reading material  Identify/define words prior to reading  Reduce amount of reading required  Allow alternative methods of data collection (dictation, interviews, fact sheets)  Set time limits for specific task completion  Enlarge text of worksheets, reading material and tests  Limit words on a page  Extend time to complete assignments  Read directions several times at start of assignments and tests  Provide additional repetition and guided practice of directions, skills and concepts  Use assistive technology (optical character recognition system, books on tape/CD, screen readers)  Reduce volume or requirements for written work, e.g., by accepting an outline or point-form notes  Break long-term assignments into manageable tasks  Extend timelines for completing assignments  Offer alternative assignments  Allow student to work on homework at school  Allow alternative methods of data collection (dictation, interviews, fact sheets)  Permit use of scribe or word processor for answers  Waive spelling, punctuation and paragraphing requirements  Use assistive technology (word processor, spell-check device, grammar-check device, text-to- speech software)  Use assistive and adaptive devices (slant boards/desktop easels) to display written material ─ pencil or pen adapted in size or grip diameter ─ alternative keyboard ─ portable word processor  Set realistic and mutually agreed- upon expectations for neatness and organization  Reduce or eliminate the need to copy from a text or board ─ provide copies of notes ─ permit student to photocopy a peer’s notes ─ provide carbon/NCR paper to a peer to allow a duplicate copy of notes to be made  Extend time to complete assignments  Alter the size, shape or location of the space provided for answers  Accept keyword responses instead of complete sentences  Allow student to type answers or to answer orally instead of in writing Appendix 6-B

13 Sample Academic and Instructional Accommodations Attention DifficultiesMemory Difficulties  Provide alternative seating ─ near teacher ─ facing teacher ─ at front of class, between well-focused students, away from distractions  Provide additional or personal work space (quiet area for study, extra seat or table, “time-out” spot, study carrels)  Permit movement during class activities and testing sessions  Provide directions in written form ─ on board ─ on worksheets ─ copied in assignment book by student  Set time limits for specific task completion  Extend time to complete tests and assignments  Use multiple testing sessions for longer tests  Use place markers, special paper, graph paper or writing templates to allow student to maintain position better or focus attention  Provide cues, e.g., arrows, stop signs, on worksheets and tests  Provide a quiet, distraction-free area for completing assignments and tests  Allow student to wear noise buffer device such as headphones to screen out distracting sounds  Provide checklists for long, detailed assignments  Provide a written outline  Provide directions in written form ─ on board ─ on worksheets ─ copied in assignment book by student  Provide a specific process for turning in completed assignments  Provide checklists for long, detailed assignments  Read and discuss standard directions several times at start of exam  Provide cues, e.g., arrows, stop signs, on worksheets and tests  Allow student to use reference aids such as dictionaries, word processors or vocabulary cue cards Appendix 6-B

14 Assessment Assessment Procedures  Assessment procedures for monitoring and evaluating student progress are identified (e.g., observations, work samples, diagnostic or standardized tests, developmental assessments, checklists) Accommodations for Assessment  Individual accommodations for assessment are identified (e.g., time, reader, scribe, equipment, testing format)

15 Measurable Goals & Objectives Measurable Goals and Objectives  Consistent with the student’s areas of growth and clearly linked to assessment data  Short-term objectives are measurable and/or observable * expected behaviour is described * conditions under which the student will perform the task * criteria for measurement * date that objective is expected to be achieved  Based on input from teachers, parents and student (where appropriate)  Manageable number of goals and objectives  New ones are added/revised as planned ones are reviewed and/or achieved

16 SMART Goals and Objectives Specific : written in clear language Specific : written in clear language Measurable : provides information for describing, assessing and evaluating student achievement Measurable : provides information for describing, assessing and evaluating student achievement Achievable: realistic for the student Achievable: realistic for the student Relevant : meaningful for the student Relevant : meaningful for the student Time-limited : can be accomplished in a specific time period Time-limited : can be accomplished in a specific time period

17 Annual Goals & Short Term Objectives Annual Goals An annual goal is a statement of one specific learning outcome that a student could realistically be expected to accomplish in one year. It is not a statement of ongoing or lifelong needs. When written effectively, an annual goal is a positive statement (what a student will do) that describes an observable event, allowing the student’s learning team to say with certainty whether or not the student has achieved the goal. An annual goal is a statement of one specific learning outcome that a student could realistically be expected to accomplish in one year. It is not a statement of ongoing or lifelong needs. When written effectively, an annual goal is a positive statement (what a student will do) that describes an observable event, allowing the student’s learning team to say with certainty whether or not the student has achieved the goal. Short-term objectives Short-term objectives are the stepping-stones between the current level of performance and the annual goal. They are the pieces necessary to achieve the annual goal and act as indicators that the goal is being achieved. Generally, each long-term goal would be supported by two to five short term objectives. Short-term objectives are the stepping-stones between the current level of performance and the annual goal. They are the pieces necessary to achieve the annual goal and act as indicators that the goal is being achieved. Generally, each long-term goal would be supported by two to five short term objectives.

18 Able to Analyses Applies Arranges Assesses Calculates Chooses (between, from) Classifies Compares Constructs Copies Counts Creates Decides Defines Demonstrates Describes Designs Determines Develops Differentiates Discriminates Discusses Distinguishes Draws Engages in Estimates Examines Explains Expresses Follows (e.g., directions, rules) Generalizes Gives (e.g., support, reasons) Greets Groups Identifies (e.g., objects, emotions) Illustrates Indicates Initiates (e.g., conversation, activity) Interacts Investigates Lists Locates Maintains (e.g., eye contact, self- control) Makes Matches Measures Names Orders Organizes Participates Points to Practises Predicts Prepares Prints Produces Proposes Ranks Rates Reacts appropriately Reads Recites Relates Repeats Responds to Selects Shares Shows Solves Speaks Specifies States (e.g., names of, reasons for) Takes (e.g., turns, care of) Tells Traces Translates Uses (e.g., time, manners, objects) Verbalizes Writes Appendix 7-A Observable and Measurable Terms Used for Phrasing IPP Goals and Objectives

19 Appendix 7-B Four-square Organizer for IPPs Long-term goal: Objective ACHIEVEMENT DATEEXPECTED BEHAVIOUR CONDITIONS under which the student will perform the task CRITERIA for measurement

20 Planning for Transition  A summary of planned actions to prepare the student for success in upcoming changes to environment is outlined at the beginning of the year  Transition plan involves family  Transition plan involves other specialists where appropriate Planning for Transition

21 Year-end Summary  Year-end summary includes most effective strategies, areas of continuing concern and recommendations for next year

22 Beginning Teachers’ Conference Sept 2014 Special Education Council


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