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Business English at Work © 2003 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

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1 Business English at Work © 2003 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

2 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Objectives Form plurals and possessives of compound nouns. Recognize nominative, objective, and possessive case nouns. Differentiate between plural and possessive forms of nouns. Form possessives of singular, plural, and irregular nouns. PP 5-1a continued

3 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Objectives Identify correct forms of organization, association, and company names. Form possessives of abbreviations, joint or separate ownership, and understood ownership. PP 5-1b continued

4 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Consists of two or more words. May be written as one word, as hyphenated words, or as two words. May not be spelled the same in all dictionaries. Compound Noun... PP 5-2

5 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns To form the plural of a one-word compound noun, follow the general rules for plurals. Plurals of One-Word Compound Nouns PP 5-3 birthdaybirthdays printoutprintouts bookshelfbookshelves photocopyphotocopies

6 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns To form the plural of a hyphenated compound noun with nouns, make the most important word plural. Plurals of Hyphenated Compound Nouns With Nouns PP 5-4 sister-in-lawsisters-in-law runner-uprunners-up senator-electsenators-elect

7 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns To form the plural of a hyphenated compound noun without nouns, add the s or es to the last word. Plurals of Hyphenated Compound Nouns Without Nouns PP 5-5 go-betweengo-betweens hang-uphang-ups hand-me-downhand-me-downs has-beenhas-beens

8 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns To form the plural of a compound noun with spaces, make the most important word plural. Plurals of Compound Nouns With Spaces PP 5-6 attorney at lawattorneys at law couch potatocouch potatoes account payableaccounts payable lieutenant generallieutenant generals

9 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Cases of Nouns or Pronouns PP 5-7a Nominative nouns or pronouns act as subjects of a sentence, as appositives, or as subject complements. The Webmaster makes all the changes to our Web pages. Jerome, our Webmaster, works until 11 p.m. Jerome is our Webmaster.

10 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Cases of Nouns or Pronouns PP 5-7b Objective nouns or pronouns act as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of prepositions, or objects of infinitives. Jackie Huerta supervisors our Webmaster. Jerome gave Jackie the passwords. Jerome discussed the Web page with Jackie. Jerome decided to limit access to the network. continued

11 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Cases of Nouns or Pronouns PP 5-7c Possessive nouns or pronouns show that someone or something owns or possesses something else (another noun). They may also indicate a relationship between two nouns. The Webmaster’s hours were long this week. Mr. Sanborn’s friend recommended the new software. continued

12 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Possessive Singular Noun PP 5-8 Form the possessive of a singular noun by adding an apostrophe and s (’s). Jerome’s office is always locked. The manager’s recommendation was excellent. The Webmaster’s new icons are unique.

13 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Possessive Plural Nouns PP 5-9 Form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s or es by adding only an apostrophe. The customers’ suggestions improved our online order form. Form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s by adding an apostrophe and s (’s). Larry’s laptop computer has a DVD drive. The women programmers developed a women’s career Web page.

14 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Separate and Joint Ownership PP 5-10 Use an apostrophe in all names of persons or companies to indicate separate ownership of an item or items. Troy’s and Michaels’s computers Use an apostrophe in the last of two or more names to show joint ownership of an item or items. Troy and Michael’s reports

15 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Use the form that the company, organization, or association displays on its logo, product, or letterhead. Some companies use as apostrophe and s; others do not. Organization, Association, and Company Names PP 5-11 Albertson’s Food & Drug Giovanni’s Italian Delicatessen Stars Music Watersavers Irrigation

16 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Compound Noun PP 5-12a Form the possessive of a singular compound noun by adding an apostrophe and s at the end of the word. The stockholder’s shares increased in value this year. Form the possessive of a plural compound noun that does not end in s by adding an apostrophe and s at the end of the word. The chiefs of police’s duties differed slightly in each city.

17 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Compound Noun PP 5-12b Form the possessive of a plural compound noun that ends in s by adding only an apostrophe at the end of the word. The vice presidents’ decision pleased the employees. continued

18 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Abbreviations PP 5-13 Form the possessive of a singular abbreviation by adding an apostrophe and s. the CPA’s report the CEO’s recommendation Form the possessive of a plural abbreviation by adding only an apostrophe. HMOs’ requirements Ph.D.s’ offices

19 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Time and Amounts PP 5-14 Form the possessive of a noun expressing time or an amount in the same way as other nouns. a week’s delay three weeks’ accumulation of five hours’ wait a year’s quota

20 Business English at Work Compound and Possessive Nouns Understood Possession PP 5-15 Use an apostrophe and s (’s) or an apostrophe (’) to show possession of a noun that is understood but not stated. Last year’s online sales were better than this year’s. Terry’s Web page received more visitors than Lorie’s.

21 Business English at Work © 2003 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill End of


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