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Learning Targets Predict what youth culture was like in the in the 1920s. Describe how life changed in the 1920s. Evaluate how changing life in the 1920s.

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Presentation on theme: "Learning Targets Predict what youth culture was like in the in the 1920s. Describe how life changed in the 1920s. Evaluate how changing life in the 1920s."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Learning Targets Predict what youth culture was like in the in the 1920s. Describe how life changed in the 1920s. Evaluate how changing life in the 1920s has impacted life today.

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4 1920s Changing Life Slang 1.Read 1.Read through “Slang of the 1920s” and circle your favorite three slang words of the 1920s. Circle 2. Circle your favorite three slang words. Share 3. Share your favorite words at your tables. Discuss 4. Discuss: What predictions about changing life in the 1920s can you make from reviewing these slang words?

5 1. The Car & Ford’s Assembly Line  assembly line makes cars affordable for masses  Impact: less isolation, roads, suburbs, economic boom Production time from 12 hours to 2 hours! $5 an day so could afford car themselves

6 Ford’s Model T 1927=$290 (3 mths. wages so used installment plans; 2/3 of sales)

7 1920sToday Discussion Think: What type of automobile technology would be considered revolutionary today? Write this in your notebook. Pair: Discuss your ideas with the person sitting next to you. Share: Share your ideas with the large group.

8 2. Harlem Renaissance & Jazz  African American achievement in literature, music, & the arts  jazz developed in South, spread across nation  Impact: A.A. literature, music, & art recognized

9 Harlem as the night spot in the 1920s

10 1920sToday Discussion –What artists today are making great achievements, such as those in the Harlem Renaissance? Who are they? –Is there a place for artists today such as there was in Harlem in the 1920s? If so, where? If not, why not?

11 3. Leisure Time  movies, radio, & sports become popular  “flappers” challenge social norms  impact: a popular culture is created 10 million movie goers 2/3 weekly 10 million radio listeners

12 4.Consumerism and Advertising  encouraged people to buy products to “improve their lives”  installment plans: “Buy now, pay later”  Impact: more sales, more debt, easier life 15% of all purchases; 60% of cars, furniture & appliances

13 Listerine Slogans “ Always a bridesmaid, Never a bride…” “If it’s bad, you won’t be welcome…Play safe … Use Listerine.” Resulting Sales 1922: $100, : $4 million

14 Money Spent on Advertising $1.5 billion on print ads in magazines and newspaper $300 million in mail $200 on billboards

15 1920sToday Discussion 1. Study your 1920s advertisement at your table. 2. Discuss how the 1920s ad would look different in Consider: –What would the product look like today? –How would it be advertised today? 3. Create a 2009 advertisement for the same (or similar) product. Share both ads with large group.

16 1920s Changing Life Slang Story 1.Review the “Slang of the 1920s” and the fads of the 1920s in “Anything Goes.” 2.Create a story about life in the 1920s using at least 10 slang words and details about the 1920s as you can. 1.Consider how life was changing in the 1920s and the cultural clash between the youth generation and the older generation. 3. Share your story at your table and pick one to share to the class.

17 “Changing Life” Final Reflection 1. Name three ways that the changing life of the 1920s have influenced the world we live in today? 2. Which has had the largest influence on our lives today? Defend your choice.

18 Learning Targets Predict conflicts present in the 1920s. Describe conflicting ideas in the 1920s. Evaluate the impact conflicting ideas had on society in the 1920s.

19 “Click Clack Moo” What is a strike? What is a union? Who represented the union in the story? Who represented the management? Why do workers strike? What are potential outcomes of a strike?

20 A Time of Cultural Clashes Youth vs. Older Generations Rural vs. Urban Fundamentalists vs. Modernists

21 1.Unions and Strikes  formed because of poor working conditions  support: immigrant workers fighting for rights  opposition: management and owners who blamed “radicals” and “communists” Steel Strike of : 3,000 strikes Involving 4 million workers Fueled fear of “Foreign” Influence b/c 80% of workers were immigrants

22 Political Cartoons in Response to Strikes of 1919 Newspaper headlines: “Plots to establish Communism.” “Conspiracy Against the Government”

23 “Red Scare” Wordle Prediction 1.As a group, look at the words in the “Red Scare” Wordle. 2.Using these words, predict how these words relate in a sentence or two of your own. 3.Share sentences.

24 Red Scare Summary In 1919, many people in the United States feared a communist revolution like the one in Russia. This caused a widespread fear of political radicals, especially Communists, also known as Reds. Immigrants, laborers and unions were often accused of being Red.

25 2. The Red Scare  fear of a Communist revolution in the U.S.  support: A. Mitchell Palmer raided “radicals”  opposition: ACLU felt it hurt civil liberties “Put them out and keep them out!” IWW headquarters after raid

26 “As gag-rulers [supporters of Sedition Laws] would have it!” Connection between Red Scare and labor

27 Scopes Trial Definitions Evolution: scientific theory that says man evolved from simpler life forms Creationism: Biblical theory that God created the universe Fundamentalism: strict belief in the bible

28 The Scopes Trial Strip Story 1.Your table will be given a series of strips from a story about the Scopes Trail. 2.Read the strips as a table. 3.Try to place them in the correct order!

29 The Scopes Trial Strip Story 1.In 1925, many states across the South had passed laws prohibiting the teaching of evolution in the classroom, including Tennessee. The law in Tennessee was known as the Butler Act. 2.The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was becoming increasingly more concerned that these laws infringed on people’s constitutional rights. 3.The ACLU decided to challenge the laws that banned evolution from schools. The organization began looking for a teacher willing to teach evolution in his classroom. 4.John T. Scopes, a 24 year old science teacher in Dayton, Tennessee, was chosen to test the Butler Act, Tennessee’s law prohibiting teaching evolution in the classroom. 5.After purposefully teaching evolution, Scopes was arrested and put on trial. 6.William Jennings Bryan, a Fundamentalist and former Presidential candidate, was chosen to be the prosecutor in the trial. Clarence Darrow, a prominent attorney, was chosen to defend Scopes. The two hated each other. 7.During the trial, Darrow called Bryan to the stand to question him on biblical beliefs. He succeeded in making Bryan look foolish. 8.Despite Darrow’s success in the trial, Scopes was found guilty and fined $100. Although the law was rarely enforced it remained on the books until 1967.

30 3. The Scopes Trial (1925)  decided it was illegal to teach evolution  support: fundamentalists  opposition: modernists; ACLU Nicknamed “The Monkey Trial” Ruling: Guilty and Fined $100 Nut TN SC Set aside

31 Opposing Views on The Scopes Trial

32 “You Can’t Make a Monkey Out of Me” c.html# We’re in a revolution just over evolution. The battle of ages is on. Some scientists all claim we’re human just by name That Monkey and Man are the same. But Darwin’s theory doesn’t sound good to me. I might have monkey manners, but with him I can’t agree. Chorus: You can’t make a monkey of me. There’s not a monkey in my family tree. I’ve searched on each branch from Adam to me. I am inclined to believe the story of Adam and Eve. There’s no chimpanzee in my pedigree. And you can’t make a monkey of me. Repeat Can science ever prove it? Will Monkey Trial remove it? We all have ideas of our own. If some with monkey’s feet, let stay in their tree. Don’t talk their chatter to me. The whole missing link puts history on the blink. I’ll give you my opinion, the whole chain was forced, I think. Chorus: You can’t make a monkey of me. There’s not a monkey in my family tree. I’ve searched on each branch from Adam to me. I am inclined to believe the story of Adam and Eve. There’s no chimpanzee in my pedigree. And you can’t make a monkey of me. You can’t make a monkey of me.

33 4. Prohibition ( )  banned alcohol under the 18th Amendment  support: Anti-Saloon League, rural areas  opposition: Urban areas, liquor lobby  led to bootlegging, speakeasies, & mafia violence

34 Chicago Speakeasies Violence of Valentine’s Day Massacre

35 Minneapolis Speakeasy “The 5-8 Club”

36 “Conflicting Ideas” Reflection Without looking at your notes, write a summary of how society and ideas were changing in the 1920s. Which change do you think had the most impact on society? Explain.

37 1920sToday Discussion Think: The 1920s was a time of conflicting ideas. What are the “conflicting ideas” of today? What changes or ideas underlie this conflict? Pair: Talk over your ideas with a partner. Share: Share as a class.

38 Harlem Renaissance Famous Person Introduction 1. Assign roles: Poster reader Recorder Timekeeper Presenter 2.Read through the famous person of the Harlem Renaissance poster. 3. Decide as a table what the three most important facts about your person are and record your answers. 4. Introduce your famous person of the Harlem Renaissance in 30 seconds.


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