Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Asking Permission to Come Ashore: Healing of the Canoe The Healing of the Canoe team NPAIHB Quarterly Meeting Kiana Lodge, April 23, 2014 Funded by NIMHD.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Asking Permission to Come Ashore: Healing of the Canoe The Healing of the Canoe team NPAIHB Quarterly Meeting Kiana Lodge, April 23, 2014 Funded by NIMHD."— Presentation transcript:

1 Asking Permission to Come Ashore: Healing of the Canoe The Healing of the Canoe team NPAIHB Quarterly Meeting Kiana Lodge, April 23, 2014 Funded by NIMHD 5R24MD001764

2

3 Healing of the Canoe What? Who? When? Where? Why? How? What next? Discussion

4 What is Healing of the Canoe Digital Story

5 AIAN Communities as Experts  Indigenous people have been scientists for thousands of years  Possess the knowledge and the tools to keep youth, family, and communities healthy  In spite of critical health disparities, Tribal communities have developed culturally grounded programs that blend traditional approaches with current “best practices”  Cultural resurgence resulting in healthier youth, families, and communities

6

7 The Healing of the Canoe: Community Pulling Together Strong People Pulling Together  Funded by the NIH/NIMHD  Three-year planning/ pilot project; 5-year extension; 3-year implementation/dissemination phase  Collaborative project between the Suquamish Tribe, Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe and the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute  Uses Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and Tribal Participatory Research (TPR) Methods  Based on community and Tribal traditions and values  Includes Tribal Council approval, Tribal resolutions, and memoranda of understanding

8 Healing of the Canoe curricula  Life skills/substance abuse information  11 sessions  Honoring Ceremony  Holding Up Our Youth  Living Life the S’Klallam Way  Generic template

9 HOC Curriculum Holding up Our Youth  One: The Four Winds/Canoe Journey as a Metaphor  Two: How am I Perceived? Media Awareness and Literacy  Three: Who am I? Beginning at the Center  Four: Community Help and Support: Help on the Journey  Five: Who Will I Become? Goal Setting  Six: Overcoming Obstacles: Solving Problems  Seven: Listening  Eight: Effective Communication: Expressing Thoughts and Feelings  Nine: Moods and Coping with Negative Emotions  Ten: Safe Journey without Alcohol and Drugs  Eleven: Strengthening our Community  Honoring Ceremony

10 The Suquamish Tribe  A sovereign tribal government.  Important components of the culture include family, canoes, fishing, song, dance, basketry, weaving & gathering.  Located on the Port Madison Indian Reservation in Suquamish, Washington, across the Puget Sound from the city of Seattle.

11 The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe  A sovereign tribal government.  PGST, originally known as the Nux Sklai Yem or Strong People, are descendants of the Salish people who have been well- established in Puget Sound’s basic and surrounding areas since 1400 A.D.  In the late 1930s, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation, located on the northern tip of the Kitsap Peninsula in Washington State, was established. Many of the Tribe’s members, who total about 1,200, still live here today.

12 Port Madison and Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservations, Kitsap County, Washington Pacific Ocean Seattle

13

14 Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, UW  Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute University of Washington 1107 NE 45th Street, Suite 120, Box Seattle, WA USA  phone: (206) | fax: (206)  The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute is a multidisciplinary research center at the University of Washington. Its mission is to support and facilitate research and research dissemination in the field of alcohol and drug abuse.

15

16

17 Principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR)  Be conducted in full partnership with the target community  Respond to issues of concern to the target community  Address needs of the community  Utilize and build on strengths and resources of the target community  Employ interventions and assessment batteries that are culturally appropriate and relevant  Is an iterative process  Generate data that not only inform science but also provide the community with information that can enhance the community’s ability to more successfully reduce health disparities and promote health Viswanathan, et al., 2004

18 Tribal Participatory Research (TPR) Model  Tribal oversight of the process and project  Tribal Council resolutions and research code  Community advisory council  Ongoing communication with community members  Use a cultural facilitator to act as an intermediary between project staff and the oversight committee, and to establish a culturally appropriate process for meetings of community members and researchers  Training and employing community members as project staff  Use culturally specific interventions and assessments that incorporate traditional practices and concepts Fisher & Ball, 2002, 2003

19

20 Expectations of Original NCMHD RFA Identify and reduce health disparities and promote health and wellness by Conducting community needs assessment Identifying and prioritizing health disparities Specifying an issue to address through development of appropriate intervention(s) Identifying and incorporating strengths/resources Developing and pilot testing community-based intervention(s)

21 Key Stakeholder Interviews & Focus Groups  Conducted key stakeholder interviews with 16 individuals nominated by the Tribe’s Cultural Cooperative, the project's CAB  Conducted focus groups with agency staff, Elders, youth, and community members  Used an adaptation of the Community Readiness Interview developed by the Tri-Ethnic Prevention Research Center  “Think about your community, the physical, mental, spiritual, and cultural health, including substance abuse problems.”  The initial question asked interviewees to identify and rank order those issues of greatest concern for the community

22 “What kinds of things are you most concerned about in your community?” Youth substance abuse A need to strengthen cultural identity, meaning and belonging as a Tribal and community member among youth “What are the greatest resources in the community to deal with these issues?” Tribal Elders Tribal Youth Suquamish Tribal traditions, values, beliefs, teachings, practices, and stories

23 While substance use was the primary target, it needed to be addressed in a way that would incorporate Tribal specific knowledge: use of extended family traditional teachings culturally specific approaches cultural restoration (mentors, crafts, language) In addition, it also would be important to incorporate methods that : promote Suquamish identity and self-efficacy build community connections promote culture, tribe, and extended family increase community support systems

24 Developing the HOC Intervention: An Iterative Process  Present to the Suquamish & University Research Teams  Present to Cultural Cooperative (CAB) & Community Curriculum Development Team  Present to the Tribal Council  Conduct Key Stakeholder Interviews  Conduct Focus Groups  Meet with Tribal Council, CAB, & Other Community Members Youth Substance Abuse & Lack of Cultural Identity Identified as Priority Concerns Identify/Review Available Evidence-based Substance Abuse Preventive Interventions, with a Focus on Those Developed and Validated with AIAN Populations Community & Research Workgroups Adapt Best Available Intervention, Making it Culturally Appropriate for Tribe

25

26 Canoe as Metaphor Digital Story

27  An 11-session prevention program plus Honoring Ceremony incorporating evidence-based components with Indigenous knowledge, traditions, and values  Provides Native Youth the skills needed to navigate through life without being pulled off course by alcohol or drugs, with tribal culture, traditions, and values as compass and anchor Healing of the Canoe: Community Pulling Together Holding Up Our Youth

28

29 HOC Curriculum Holding up Our Youth  One: The Four Winds/Canoe Journey as a Metaphor  Two: How am I Perceived? Media Awareness and Literacy  Three: Who am I? Beginning at the Center  Four: Community Help and Support: Help on the Journey  Five: Who Will I Become? Goal Setting  Six: Overcoming Obstacles: Solving Problems  Seven: Listening  Eight: Effective Communication: Expressing Thoughts and Feelings  Nine: Moods and Coping with Negative Emotions  Ten: Safe Journey without Alcohol and Drugs  Eleven: Strengthening our Community  Honoring Ceremony

30 Cultural Activities Taught During the HOC Curriculum  Tribal History  History of Tribal Council  Storytelling  Introductions in Lushootseed  Drum Making  Museum and archives  Digital Story  Wool Weaving  Native Plants  Foods of our Ancestors  Natural Resources  Hatchery

31 Implementation  Middle school and high school youth  After school program  Summer school program  Tribal high school  Series of intensive retreats

32

33

34

35

36 HOC Phase III

37

38 Next steps  Funded through January 31, 2016  Possible new project as suicide prevention  ???

39 Pulling Together Equitable distribution of resources Hire staff in the community Blend of local and academic knowledge and expertise Educate Institutional Review Boards Negotiate Data Ownership/Sharing/Use Agreements Co-authorship Transparency, trust, respect Ask permission to come ashore, ask permission to leave

40 Benefits  Tribal specific curricula  Training other Tribes/Native communities  Networking  Mutually increased capacity  Institutional change  Data  IRB  “I consider working with the tribal research partnerships and developing a mutually acceptable MOU one of my greatest accomplishments while I’ve been here. Thank you for the opportunity to be involved with such great work”

41 The Suquamish Tribe Suquamish Cultural Cooperative Suquamish Tribal Council Suquamish Elders Suquamish Education Suquamish Community Robin Sigo Albie Lawrence Lenora Bagley Lisa Jackson Gidget Lincoln Laura Sachs Steve Gallion Truth Griffeth

42  Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe  Port Gamble Tribal Council  Chi-e-chee Community Advisory Board  Port Gamble Elders  Laura Price  Kelly Baze  Abby Purser  Joe Price  Steph Dixon

43 University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute  Dennis Donovan  Lisa Rey Thomas  Lisette Austin  Heather Lonczak  Merrilee Gavigan  Belinda Sachs  G. Alan Marlatt  Bonnie Duran

44 Questions and Discussion Healingofthecanoe.org


Download ppt "Asking Permission to Come Ashore: Healing of the Canoe The Healing of the Canoe team NPAIHB Quarterly Meeting Kiana Lodge, April 23, 2014 Funded by NIMHD."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google