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Evidenced Based Mentoring (EBM) 101 An Introduction to Mentoring and Evidence-based Mentoring Practices.

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Presentation on theme: "Evidenced Based Mentoring (EBM) 101 An Introduction to Mentoring and Evidence-based Mentoring Practices."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evidenced Based Mentoring (EBM) 101 An Introduction to Mentoring and Evidence-based Mentoring Practices

2 Agenda O Welcome O Definition of EBM O Types of Mentoring Models O Benefits of EBM O Challenges to EBM O What Challenges Have You Faced? O Strategies of Overcoming Challenges O Resources to Support EBM Implementation and Evaluation

3 Definition of EBM Effective Mentoring… O is a structured, one-to-one relationship or partnership that focuses on the needs of mentored participants. O fosters caring and supportive relationships. O encourages individuals to develop to their fullest potential. O helps an individual to develop his or her own vision for the future. O is a strategy to develop active community partnerships. Rhodes, J.E. (2002). Stand by me: The risks and rewards of mentoring today’s youth. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

4 Types of Mentoring Models Culturally Specific Peer to Peer One on One Group/ Team Gender Specific The Five Fingers of Mentoring

5 Characteristics of an Effective EBM Program O target youth that will benefit most from mentoring, namely those most at risk; O have clearly defined and articulated goals and expectations; O include a level of flexibility that accommodates the diverse personalities and needs of mentors and mentees; Cavell, DuBois, Karcher, Keller, & Rhodes, 2009; Jekielek, Moore, & Hair, 2002; Federal Mentoring Council, n.d.

6 Characteristics of an Effective EBM Program O have mentors with previous relevant experience in helping others and who are committed to at least 12 months of participation; O incorporate activities that facilitate relationship building; O support and involve parents and families; Cavell, DuBois, Karcher, Keller, & Rhodes, 2009; Jekielek, Moore, & Hair, 2002; Federal Mentoring Council, n.d.

7 Characteristics of an Effective EBM Programs O coordinate with other services and supports as needed; O provide some structure to allow for careful matching between mentors with mentees; O provide training for mentors both before and after they are matched with youth; Cavell, DuBois, Karcher, Keller, & Rhodes, 2009; Jekielek, Moore, & Hair, 2002; Federal Mentoring Council, n.d.

8 Characteristics of a Effective EBM Programs O have rigorous and reliable screening practices for mentors in order to protect children; O provide consistent oversight, training, and support including early problem detection to ensure that needs of mentees are being met and concerns are being addressed effectively; and O continuously evaluate and monitor program implementation and youth and mentor outcomes, and are flexible enough to change as necessary Cavell, DuBois, Karcher, Keller, & Rhodes, 2009; Jekielek, Moore, & Hair, 2002; Federal Mentoring Council, n.d.

9 Benefits for the Mentee in EBM Programs O Increased high school graduation rates O Lower high school dropout rates O Healthier relationships and lifestyle choices O Better attitude about school O Higher college enrollment rates and higher educational aspirations MENTOR, 2009; Cavell, DuBois, Karcher, Keller, & Rhodes, 2009

10 Benefits for the Mentee in EBM Programs O Enhanced self-esteem and self-confidence O Improved behavior, both at home and at school O Stronger relationships with parents, teachers, and peers O Improved interpersonal skills O Decreased likelihood of initiating drug and alcohol use MENTOR, 2009; Cavell, DuBois, Karcher, Keller, & Rhodes, 2009

11 Benefits for the Mentor in EBM Programs O Increased self-esteem O A sense of accomplishment O Creation of networks of volunteers O Insight into childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood O Increased patience and improved supervisory skills U.S. Department of Labor, n.d.

12 Challenges to Implementing EBM Programs From a 2005 survey of mentors… O Fourteen percent reported that the mentor expected more from the relationship. O Eleven percent reported that the mentee expected too much from the relationship. O Eleven percent reported that the mentor and mentee could not build a positive relationship. O Seven percent reported a poor match between mentor and mentee. Mentor, 2006

13 Challenges to Implementing EBM Programs From a 2005 survey of mentors… O Seven percent reported that the boundaries of the relationship were not clear. O Seven percent reported a lack of staff support. O Four percent reported ethical issues. O Six percent reported disagreements with program staff regarding program rules. Mentor, 2006

14 What challenges have you faced?

15 Strategies for Overcoming Challenges From a 2005 survey of mentors… O spending more time with the young person (41 percent), O having more materials/resources available (35 percent), O being better informed/more knowledgeable (31 percent), and O receiving better training (30 percent) MENTOR, 2006

16 Evidence Based Practices in Mentoring O Recruitment O Screening O Training O Matching O Monitoring and Support O Closure

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18 Strategies for Overcoming Challenges

19 Mentoring Resources


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