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2015 Highway Safety Performance Plan Jay Wall, Chief of Plans & Programs Oklahoma Highway Safety Office.

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Presentation on theme: "2015 Highway Safety Performance Plan Jay Wall, Chief of Plans & Programs Oklahoma Highway Safety Office."— Presentation transcript:

1 2015 Highway Safety Performance Plan Jay Wall, Chief of Plans & Programs Oklahoma Highway Safety Office

2 HSP Planning Process Long range planning is a year round process spanning several years, usually from 2 years prior to and extending 2 years forward from the current fiscal year. Short term planning for next year begins with approval of the current years plan, which usually occurs in the latter part of August and kicks off with this event. The 2016 Highway Safety Plan must be submitted to NHTSA for approval by July 1, 2015.

3 Planning Process - continued Description of data sources and processes used to identify the State’s highway safety problems; Identify the participants in the process; Description of selected performance measures and performance targets; Identify the projects selected as well as the “evidence-based” countermeasure strategies the selected projects will utilize; Provide a program-area-level report on the State’s success in meeting State performance targets from the previous year’s HSP; The plan must contain a number of elements, including:

4 There are eleven (11) Core performance measures and one (1) core Behavioral measure which must be included in the HSP: C-1Number of Traffic Fatalities (FARS) C-2Number of Serious Injuries in MV crashes (state data) C-3Fatalities per VMT Overall, Urban and Rural (FARS) C-4Unrestrained Fatalities, all seating positions (FARS) C-5Number of Fatalities operator.08 or more (FARS) C-6Speed Related Fatalities (FARS) C-7Motorcyclist Fatalities (FARS) C-8Unhelmeted Motorcyclist Fatalities (FARS) C-9Drivers Under age 21 Involved in Fatal Crashes (FARS) C-10Pedestrian Fatalities C-11Bicyclist Fatalities B-1Statewide Seat Belt Use Rate *FARS – Fatality Analysis Reporting System

5 There are eleven (11) Core performance measures and one (1) core Behavioral measure which must be included in the HSP: C-1Number of Traffic Fatalities (FARS) C-2Number of Serious Injuries in MV crashes (state data) C-3Fatalities per VMT Overall, Urban and Rural (FARS) C-4Unrestrained Fatalities, all seating positions (FARS) C-5Number of Fatalities operator.08 or more (FARS) C-6Speed Related Fatalities (FARS) C-7Motorcyclist Fatalities (FARS) C-8Unhelmeted Motorcyclist Fatalities (FARS) C-9Drivers Under age 21 Involved in Fatal Crashes (FARS) C-10Pedestrian Fatalities C-11Bicyclist Fatalities B-1Statewide Seat Belt Use Rate *FARS – Fatality Analysis Reporting System

6 Planning Process - continued Fatalities in alcohol-impaired traffic crashes have decreased more than 15% since However, the model indicates that this decline will stop and the trend will remain flat through Factors considered in setting goals were an expected increase in miles driven, increases in licensed drivers, strengthening laws, and population shifts from rural to urban. It will take one to three years to determine if efforts in strengthening enforcement and laws will have the expected results.

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9 Planning Process - continued July-August ◦ Complete preparation of next FY grant agreements ◦ Obtain necessary authorizations to execute agreements September ◦ Host Stakeholders Meeting ◦ Finalize Plans for Project Directors Course October ◦ Implement current year HSP projects October 1 ◦ Conduct annual Project Directors Training Course November-December ◦ Draft and submit prior year’s Annual Report ◦ Establish and post preliminary goals for next years HSP December-January ◦ Open solicitation of grant proposals for next FY

10 Planning Process - continued January-February ◦ Begin preliminary review of submitted proposals and identification of possible further solicitations March ◦ Host statewide forum/workshop to address identified topics and solicit input April ◦ Set initial performance targets for next FY HSP ◦ Selection process for next FY projects May-June ◦ Negotiate project agreements for next FY ◦ Draft next FY HSP June ◦ Finalize goals and performance targets for next FY ◦ Finalize and submit next FY HSP

11 So after all this, what were the identified problems and solutions?  Impaired driving This still remains the #1 focus of attention, with 29% of fatality crashes in Oklahoma involving impaired drivers. A NHTSA study conducted in 2010, on a best to worst scale in the number of impaired driving fatalities, ranked Oklahoma 46 th out of 51 - and dead last in improving its fatality rate. Here is an excerpt from a recently published article in a Wall Street report which reports Oklahoma ranks 6 th worst in the nation in the number of drunk driving deaths per 100,000 VMT.

12 Oklahoma’s drunk driving problem has seen little improvement over the decade ending in While Oklahoma manages to curb underage drinking relatively well, the number of drunk driving fatalities among drinking-age adults decreased by just 5.3% over the 10 years ending in 2012, a far lower decline than in most other states. Current anti-drunk driving laws do not seem to be effective at deterring drunk drivers in the state, as nearly 79% of all drunk driving fatalities involved a driver with a blood alcohol content of at least 0.15% — well above the legal limit of 0.08%.This is despite the fact that the state has an “aggravated DUI” law that imposes harsher penalties on drunk drivers with a blood alcohol level of 0.15% or more. Source: 24/7 Wall St, April 25, 2014 So which five States were worse than Oklahoma??

13 #5Mississippi #4Wyoming #3South Carolina #2Montana #1North Dakota

14 STATEUSE RATE 1Oregon98.2 2California97.4 3Alabama97.3 4Georgia95.5 5Minnesota94.8 6Washington94.5 7Hawaii94.0 8Illinois93.7 9Michigan Delaware New Mexico Iowa South Carolina Indiana New York New Jersey Maryland Texas North Carolina District of Columbia Florida Connecticut Alaska Rhode Island Kentucky Tennessee Oklahoma Maine Louisiana Wisconsin Kansas Arkansas Mississippi74.4  Occupant Protection: Of the 33 states having a mandatory seat belt law, Oklahoma ranked #27 in the 2013 national survey results.

15  Crashes involving Fatality or Serious Injury On the rise again in 2014 The primary goal of any traffic safety effort is to reduce the number of persons killed or injured in MV crashes - as well as reducing the number of crashes overall. This is accomplished through a number of strategies, including: enforcement, training, education, statistical analysis, etc.. Using both FARS and State data, cities and counties are ranked based on their vehicle crash rates. This data, which is published each year in the OHSO Crash Facts Book, along with other statistical or relevant data, are used by the OHSO in evaluating which project proposals to approve in order to make the best use of available funding sources to address local problems.

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17  Motorcycles Motorcycle fatalities showed a significant spike in numbers in From 2008 to 2012, the age group was the leading group involved in motorcyclist fatalities, representing about 25% of MC fatalities. In 2011, the State Motorcycle Advisory Committee was formed to provide for a centralized discussion of this growing problem and how to best address it. There are a number of projects recommended by this committee in the FY15 HSP to address identified needs in training and education.

18  Traffic Records Accomplishments: o Electronic submission of crash reports o E-citations o Collision analysis systems (such as SAFE-T) o DDACTS (Data Driven Approaches to Crime & Traffic Safety) Improvements needed: o Continued efforts to increase electronic processing and integration of traffic records at the state and local level; o Creation of a statewide DUI tracking database; o Better integration of record keeping system between local and state agencies.

19 Other program areas addressed: Bicyclist and Pedestrian INCOG Tulsa Rail Grade Crossings Oklahoma Operation Lifesaver Driver Education DPS and Educational Alternatives Media and PI&E efforts

20 104 projects were selected for inclusion in the FY15 HSP

21 Total of $10,232,030 in those104 funded projects

22 ohso.ok.gov


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