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Michigan State University Healthy Campus Initiative Michigan State University Healthy Campus Initiative Using NCHA, 2010 Objectives and Standards in an.

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Presentation on theme: "Michigan State University Healthy Campus Initiative Michigan State University Healthy Campus Initiative Using NCHA, 2010 Objectives and Standards in an."— Presentation transcript:

1 Michigan State University Healthy Campus Initiative Michigan State University Healthy Campus Initiative Using NCHA, 2010 Objectives and Standards in an Outcome-Based Logic Model Dennis Martell, PhD -

2 Michigan State University Student Population Undergraduate students: 35,197Graduate students: 8,349 Professional students: 1,391Total enrollment: 44,937 MSU is the largest single campus student body of any Michigan university and among the largest in the country. Women: 24,266Men: 20, percent, minorities. Nearly 88.6 percent of MSU students were from Michigan. MSU's residence hall system has a capacity of 17,197 students. Students also may live in the 2,340 campus apartments.

3 “Bringing people together as citizens and community members to decide for themselves the kinds of lives they think are most worth living.” “Bringing people together as citizens and community members to decide for themselves the kinds of lives they think are most worth living.” David Buchanan, An Ethic For Health Promotion

4 Michigan State University Mission: …the university provides opportunities for the fullest possible development of the potential of each student and each citizen served, and enhances the quality of life…

5 ‘A’ Vision of a Healthy Campus based on the mission A campus which provides opportunities and support for the fullest possible development of individual free thought and action in the pursuit of learning.

6 Questions to Begin a Campus Health Initiative! Where are we now? Where do we want to be? How are we going to get there? How will we know when we have arrived?

7 ACHA’s Tripod Tools for Developing Healthy Campus Initiatives Where are we now? Where do we want to Where do we want to be? How are we going to get there ? How do we know when we are there?

8 Pre-process: Define: Define: –‘health’, and then who you are! what is more important to know: who you are or what you do’? –Collaboration –Stakeholders Pre-invest in ‘individual leaders’ Pre-invest in ‘individual leaders’

9 Great Leaders are needed: "A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don't necessarily want to go but ought to be." Rosalyn Carter A great leader has a clear vision of how a better future could or should unfold.

10 Standards of Practice, Six Standards Six Standards –Integrate with the Learning Mission of Higher Education –Collaborative Practice –Cultural Competence –Theory-Based Practice –Evidence-Based Practice –Continuing Professional Development and Service

11 An Outcome-Based Planning Process Scan & assess the population/environment Select strategies best suited for outcomes Generate expected outcomes Set long-range outcomes (ultimate goals) Clarify assumptions for individual/environmental change change

12 Outcome-Based planning Product: A Logic Model Current Reality: Pop. IHE Community Theory Model Framework for CORE Functions Efforts to Stimulate Change Vision of Changes for: Pop. IHE Community Context Assumptions Strategies/ Services Outcomes Standards NCHA2010 HCO Where are we now?Where do we want to be?How do we get there? How do we know when we are there there?

13 2010 Objectives were divided into three categories-  Broad Mission Objectives relating to dissemination of health information across campus,  Health and Academic Impact Objectives concerned with decreasing the negative effect of specific health behaviors on students ability to be successful academically &  Programmatic Mission Objectives relating to specific target goals within the service areas currently offered by health education.

14 Broad Mission Objectives- Information on Health Targets: National DNC College 17.4 % Our Campus 10 % National DNC College 17.4 % Our Campus 10 %Baselines: National DNC College 3.1% Our Campus 4.6% National DNC College 3.1% Our Campus 4.6% Increase the proportion of Michigan State University freshman that receive information from MSU on all of the eleven priority health-risk behavior areas. (7-3a.) 1. Increase the proportion of Michigan State University freshman that receive information from MSU on all of the eleven priority health-risk behavior areas. (7-3a.) Target setting method: National: College: Better than the best within Healthy Campus Making It Happen Campus Making It Happen Our Campus: Best of the Best (Freshman Males = 10%) (Freshman Males = 10%) Data sources: National: College: Spring 2000 ACHA-National College Health Assessment (NCHA). College Health Assessment (NCHA). Our Campus: 2004 ACHA Spring MSU (NCHA)

15 Awareness Education Proposed printing and distribution of a multifaceted -informational brochure on brochure on all eleven health topics distributed to all incoming freshmen and their parents of their parents of class of fall 2005 Increase in the percentage of percentage of freshmen who will utilize health services on campus Increase in health protective & decrease in health risky beliefs and perceptions about health Increase awareness of protective institutional policies & practices Increase the proportion of proportion of Michigan State University University freshman that receive receive information information from MSU on all of the eleven priority health-risk health-risk behavior areas. (7-3a.) Harm Reduction: Environmental Management Social Norming: Current Reality: Public/LandGrantMidwestConservative NCHA % of freshmen in 2004 reported in 2004 reported receiving info on receiving info on all eleven topics all eleven topics (as identified by (as identified by Healthy Campus Healthy Campus 2010 as priority 2010 as priority areas) from MSU areas) from MSU last year. last year. 10% of freshman males reported males reported receiving info on receiving info on all eleven health all eleven health topics topics Long-Range Outcome Outcome Intermediate Outcomes Outcomes Strategies AssumptionsTheory/Model Context/ Data

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17 2. Increase the proportion of MSU students, particularly freshmen, who report receiving information on each of the eleven priority health-risk behavior areas: ( M- NCHA q2. ) a.tobacco prevention, b.alcohol and other drugs, c.sexual assault/ relationship violence, d. violence prevention, e. injury prevention and safety, f. suicide prevention, g. pregnancy prevention, h. AIDS and HIV infection prevention, i. sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, j. dietary behaviors and nutrition, and k. physical activity and fitness. Broad Mission Objectives- Information on Health

18 2a. TOBACCO USE PREVENTION (7-3b-1) 2a. TOBACCO USE PREVENTION (7-3b-1) Targets: National DNC College 55 % Our Campus 37 % National DNC College 55 % Our Campus 37 %Baselines: National DNC College 21 % Our Campus 27 % National DNC College 21 % Our Campus 27 % Target setting method: National: College: Better than the best Our Campus: Better than the best (Freshman = 27 % plus 10% ). Targets: National DNC College 55 % Our Campus 70 % Baselines: National DNC College 47.1% Our Campus 66% 2b. ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS Target setting method: National: College: Better than the best Our Campus: Better than the best (Freshman = 66 % plus 5%).

19 Health & Academic Impact Objectives 3. Academic Impact Objective- Stress Reduce the proportion of MSU students who received a lower grade on an exam, project or course, or an incomplete or dropped a course due to stress. (18 M-NCHA 44x.a.) (This is an objective using the impediment to academic performance “Stress.” It is related to the Mental Health Leading Health Indicators and Focus Area 18.) Target setting method: National: College: Better than the best (Male = 27 %). Our Campus: Better than the best (Male = 23 %). Targets: National DNC College 27 % Our Campus 23 % National DNC College 27 % Our Campus 23 % Baselines: Baselines: National DNC College 33.4 % Our Campus 29 % National DNC College 33.4 % Our Campus 29 % ACHA-National College Health Assessment (NCHA), Spring % Who Had and Academic Performance Affected % Did % Had, % Had, GENDER RACE RESIDENCE % Did % Had, % Had, GENDER RACE RESIDENCE Health Problem Not Have No Effect Some Effect Male Female White Other On Off Stress *** * Stress *** *

20 4. Academic Impact Objective- Internet Use Reduce the proportion of MSU students who received a lower grade on an exam, project or course, or an incomplete or dropped a course due to internet use or playing computer games. (18 M-NCHA 44P.) Targets: National DNC College 10 % Our Campus 11 % National DNC College 10 % Our Campus 11 % Baselines: Baselines: National DNC College 13.4 % Our Campus 15 % National DNC College 13.4 % Our Campus 15 % Target setting method: National: College: Better than the best (Female = 10 %). Our Campus: Better than the best (Female = 11% ). % Who Had and Academic Performance Affected By Gender & Race % Did % Had, % Had, GENDER RACE RESIDENCE % Did % Had, % Had, GENDER RACE RESIDENCE Health Problem Not Have No Effect Some Effect Male Female White Other On Off Internet *** *** *** Internet *** *** ***

21 Mission Objectives- Program Related 7. Mission Objective- Exercise Increase the proportion of MSU students who report exercising at least 3 or more times a week and vigorously enough to promote cardiovascular fitness. (M-NCHA 39a.) Targets: National DNC College 55 % Our Campus 46 % National DNC College 55 % Our Campus 46 % Baselines: National DNC College 40.3 % Our Campus 41 % National DNC College 40.3 % Our Campus 41 % Target setting method: National: College: Better than the best (Males = 55 %). Our Campus: Better than the best (College Females = 41 % plus 5 %= 46 %). Note: College data reflects number of days in the last week students had participated in moderate or vigorous exercise. ACHA-National College Health Assessment (NCHA) MSU TABLE 3.% Distribution of Weight Status, Exercise, and Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among Respondents, by Background Characteristics % GENDER RACE RESIDENCE % GENDER RACE RESIDENCE Health Problem- Exercise n Overall Male Female White Other On Off Participate in vigorous exercise for 20 minutes 1285 or moderate exercise for 30 minutes... or moderate exercise for 30 minutes... 3 or more days per week

22 AwarenessEducation Proposedcollaboration between Healthy U, Olin Health Ed, and MSU Intra- Mural and Recreative Sports to sponsor an online activity logging/ tracking and incentive program open to students, faculty & staff for fall 2005 Increase in the Increase in the percentage of percentage of students who will utilize exercise facilities on campus Increase in health protective & decrease in health risky beliefs and perceptions about exercise Increase practices that facilitate access and decrease barriers to exercise barriers to exercise thru awareness thru awareness and change of institutional institutional policies & practices Increase the proportion of MSU students of MSU students who report who report exercising at least 3 or more least 3 or more times a week and vigorously enough to promotecardiovascularfitness. (M-NCHA 39a Harm Reduction: EnvironmentalManagement Social Norming: Current Reality Data on MSU students NCHA % of females in 2004 reported in 2004 reported participating in vigorous/ moderate exercise 3 or more times in the last week for minutes. 38% of males males reported males reported in 2004 reported in 2004 reported participating in vigorous/ moderate exercise 3 or more times in the last week for minutes. Long-Range Outcome Outcome Intermediate Intermediate Outcomes Outcomes Strategies AssumptionsTheory/Model Context/ Data

23 Learn More Learn More Why Americans are getting on the move... Why Americans are getting on the move... The eating and physical activity patterns of many Americans have made us the most overweight nation in the world. More than 60% of American adults do not get the recommended 30 minutes of physical activity a day, and 25% of American adults aren’t physically active at all. More than 120 million Americans — 64.5% of the adult population — are overweight; nearly 59 million, or 31%, are obese. The eating and physical activity patterns of many Americans have made us the most overweight nation in the world. More than 60% of American adults do not get the recommended 30 minutes of physical activity a day, and 25% of American adults aren’t physically active at all. More than 120 million Americans — 64.5% of the adult population — are overweight; nearly 59 million, or 31%, are obese. Simple changes America On the Move’s pilot program, Colorado On the Move, demonstrated that Americans can stop weight gain by balancing energy expenditure and calorie consumption. The message is simple: move more and eat less by making 2 small daily changes... Simple changes America On the Move’s pilot program, Colorado On the Move, demonstrated that Americans can stop weight gain by balancing energy expenditure and calorie consumption. The message is simple: move more and eat less by making 2 small daily changes... Take 2000 more steps (about 1 mile) Take 2000 more steps (about 1 mile) Eat 100 fewer calories. Eat 100 fewer calories. Getting started Everything you need to begin making simple changes for better health is online at America On the Move. Here are just a few of the features and benefits: Getting started Everything you need to begin making simple changes for better health is online at America On the Move. Here are just a few of the features and benefits: Active living — track your physical activity on some of America’s most famous trails. And there are motivating articles to help you get moving and stay active. Active living — track your physical activity on some of America’s most famous trails. And there are motivating articles to help you get moving and stay active. Healthy eating — learn simple, easy ways to reduce calories by 100 a day and record your progress over time. Healthy eating — learn simple, easy ways to reduce calories by 100 a day and record your progress over time. Pacesetter — compare your progress against other America On the Move participants. Pacesetter — compare your progress against other America On the Move participants. Move Mates — this is a fun way to offer and receive support from others in America On the Move. When you and a buddy opt in to this feature you can view each other’s progress from your computer. Move Mates — this is a fun way to offer and receive support from others in America On the Move. When you and a buddy opt in to this feature you can view each other’s progress from your computer. Links — we’ve highlighted some of our favorite health, nutrition, and physical activity websites for you — the best of the Web is just a click away. Links — we’ve highlighted some of our favorite health, nutrition, and physical activity websites for you — the best of the Web is just a click away. Goal setting — this handy feature allows you to set health goals and keep notes on your progress throughout your America On the Move experience. Goal setting — this handy feature allows you to set health goals and keep notes on your progress throughout your America On the Move experience. Events — discover what America On the Move events are going on around the country, in your state, and even your town. Events — discover what America On the Move events are going on around the country, in your state, and even your town. On the Move e-newsletter — sign up for our every-other-month update on the latest in healthy eating and active living as well as the movement known as America On the Move and more. America On the Move is growing and we’re adding new features and content to our site every week. On the Move e-newsletter — sign up for our every-other-month update on the latest in healthy eating and active living as well as the movement known as America On the Move and more. America On the Move is growing and we’re adding new features and content to our site every week. Individuals and groups You can register yourself as well as your group to participate in America On the Move. Individuals and groups You can register yourself as well as your group to participate in America On the Move.group

24 Strategic Considerations & Challenges : Bring students/groups/government ‘individual leaders’ in on it early!Bring students/groups/government ‘individual leaders’ in on it early! Cultivate academic and research partners: credibility and assistance!Cultivate academic and research partners: credibility and assistance! Sell yourself as the health leader/ resource of choice for the community!Sell yourself as the health leader/ resource of choice for the community! Cultivate media relations assistance and support!Cultivate media relations assistance and support! Challenge: Collaboration with Healthy U, Residence Life, and Student Affairs-Challenge: Collaboration with Healthy U, Residence Life, and Student Affairs-


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