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Preview Your First Love All those exciting and wonderful new emotions —— the way your heart raced when that special person was near 那位特别的人近在身边时的急速心跳所有那些激动人心的新奇感觉.

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Presentation on theme: "Preview Your First Love All those exciting and wonderful new emotions —— the way your heart raced when that special person was near 那位特别的人近在身边时的急速心跳所有那些激动人心的新奇感觉."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Your First Love All those exciting and wonderful new emotions —— the way your heart raced when that special person was near 那位特别的人近在身边时的急速心跳所有那些激动人心的新奇感觉 Those anxious, awkward moments when you didn’t know what to say or do 那种因为不知所措而感到的焦虑笨拙 That sad moments when for one reason or another it all came to an end 因为某种原因而一切告吹的悲伤 Preview

4 “Every love story ends as a tragedy” 每个爱情故事都以悲剧告终 The authors in this unit have a different point of view 本单元作者另有高见Preview

5 Text A Text A Text A Text A Focus on the unexpected side effects of the author’s first venture into romance 主要讲述作 者初次浪漫历程所带来的意外影响 Focus on the unexpected side effects of the author’s first venture into romance 主要讲述作 者初次浪漫历程所带来的意外影响 Focus on the unexpected side effects of the author’s first venture into romance 主要讲述作 者初次浪漫历程所带来的意外影响 Focus on the unexpected side effects of the author’s first venture into romance 主要讲述作 者初次浪漫历程所带来的意外影响 Text B Text B Text B Text B Recall the ups and downs of the author’s great love for his car. 回顾作者对他汽车跌宕起伏的爱 Recall the ups and downs of the author’s great love for his car. 回顾作者对他汽车跌宕起伏的爱 Recall the ups and downs of the author’s great love for his car. 回顾作者对他汽车跌宕起伏的爱 Recall the ups and downs of the author’s great love for his car. 回顾作者对他汽车跌宕起伏的爱 Text C Text C Text C Text C Offer some fascinating advice about how to successfully navigate romantic relationships. 提 出一些如何处理浪漫关系的引人入胜的忠告 Offer some fascinating advice about how to successfully navigate romantic relationships. 提 出一些如何处理浪漫关系的引人入胜的忠告 Offer some fascinating advice about how to successfully navigate romantic relationships. 提 出一些如何处理浪漫关系的引人入胜的忠告 Offer some fascinating advice about how to successfully navigate romantic relationships. 提 出一些如何处理浪漫关系的引人入胜的忠告Preview

6 Questions to Text C How can you successfully navigate romantic relationships? – If you want to manage to be in a constant state of romance just as you feel like sailing safely, what should you do? 驾驭浪漫之舟, 保持婚姻稳定,迎刃有余地处理或平衡浪漫之旅 Physical attraction 身体的魅力 Shared goals, interests, and belief system 共同的目标、兴趣和信仰体系 Mutual respect, acceptance, and the desire to please each other 相 互间尊重、认可和取悦对方的欲望 Mutual honesty and trust 相互间的真诚与信赖

7 Realistic expectations for each other and the relationship 对对方和这份关系的切合实际的期望 A balance of dependence and independence 依赖与独立的平衡 A cooperative approach to problems 解决问题的合作态度 A shared life 共同的生活 These are the ties which hold the two of you together as a couple; or the strengths which will form the basis for your love, supporting your relationship through the challenges to come. 这是将你们作为情侣联结 在一起的纽带,这些力量将构成你们爱的基础,在未来挑战中支撑 着你们的关系Preview

8 21st Century College English: Book 3 How I Got Smart Unit 1: Part A

9 Pre-reading Activities Pre-reading ActivitiesPre-reading ActivitiesPre-reading Activities Text A: Language Points Text A: Language PointsText A: Language PointsText A: Language Points Exercises ExercisesExercises Assignment AssignmentAssignment

10 How many of these idioms do you know? If any of them are unfamiliar to you, hypothesize about what they might mean. Then as you listen to the passage, a) circle the idioms you hear in the dialogue, and b) check to make sure your hypotheses are correct. love at first sightfall in lovemake a pass at sb. 调情,勾引 puppy love 少年初恋 flirt with sb. 调情,打情骂俏 have a crush on sb. 迷恋 Lovebirds 一对情侣 be head over heels in love 深爱着 ; weep sb. off his/her feet 使某人神魂颠倒 Pre-reading Activities Check-up

11 love at first sightfall in lovemake a pass at sb. puppy loveflirt with sb.have a crush on sb. lovebirdsbe head over heels in love sweep sb. off his/her feet Pre-reading Activities Script How many of these idioms do you know? If any of them are unfamiliar to you, hypothesize about what they might mean. Then as you listen to the passage, a) circle the idioms you hear in the dialogue, and b) check to make sure your hypotheses are correct.

12 Man: Do you remember the first time you fell in love? Woman: You mean puppy love, or the real thing? Man: Either one! After all, when you’re going through it, puppy love feels like the real thing. Woman:Let’s see. When I was a sophomore in high school, I had a crush on my biology teacher. Man: A biology teacher, oh my! That was ambitious of you! Did you let him know how you felt? Woman:You mean did I flirt with him or something? No, of course not, I was too shy for that. But I surely worked hard on my biology homework! Pre-reading Activities

13 Text A Language Points How I Got Smart By Steve Brody How I Got Smart By Steve Brody

14 The structure of Text A I. Introduction to the story I. Introduction to the story I. Introduction to the story I. Introduction to the story II.The whole story II.The whole story II.The whole story II.The whole story III. The after events of the story III. The after events of the story III. The after events of the story III. The after events of the story Para. 1-3 Paras Para. 34 Para. 34

15 How I Got Smart By Steve Brody 1 A common misconception among youngsters attending school is that their teachers were child prodigies. Who else but a bookworm, with none of the normal kid’s tendency to play rather than study, would grow up to be a teacher anyway? misconceptionWho else but a bookworm, with none of the normal kid’s tendency to play rather than study, would grow up to be a teacher anyway?misconceptionWho else but a bookworm, with none of the normal kid’s tendency to play rather than study, would grow up to be a teacher anyway? Language Points

16 misconception n. —wrong idea based on a failure to understand a situation Examples: The medicine company held a press to change the misconception about its new product.The medicine company held a press to change the misconception about its new product. Vocabulary building mis -referring that the action is done wrongly or badly mislead — to cause to believe sth. that is not true —to cause to behave in a wrong way misreport —to provide information that is not completely true or correct misjudge —to form an unfair or incorrect opinion or idea about sth./sb. miscount —to reach a total, when counting, which is not correct

17 Who else but a bookworm, with none of the normal kid’s tendency to play rather than study, would grow up to be a teacher anyway? Paraphrase Who else would ever grow up to be a teacher at all except a bookworm who, unlike other kids, likes to study but not to play? bookworm n. —a person devoted to reading tendency n. —part of a person’s character that makes him like (to do) sth. Examples: He’s always had a tendency towards fast cars.He’s always had a tendency towards fast cars. His tendency to exaggerate is well known.His tendency to exaggerate is well known. anyway ad. —(often used in conversation without adding much meaning to what is being said) in any case, anyhow Examples: Why don’t we get rid of the car since we don’t use it anyway?Why don’t we get rid of the car since we don’t use it anyway? What was he doing with so much of the company’s money in his personal account anyway?What was he doing with so much of the company’s money in his personal account anyway?

18 rather than Paraphrase Who else would ever grow up to be a teacher at all except a bookworm who, unlike other kids, likes to study but not to play? rather than Meaning: Meaning:to say what someone does not do or does not intend to do in contrast to what they actually do rather than Rules: 1)The word or phrase introduced by rather than is generally in the same form as the one parallel to it in the main clause; 2) When the main clause has an infinitive, rather than can be followed by an infinitive with “to” (which is more formal) or without “to”, while a V-ing form is also possible; 3) When the main clause has a verb in the past tense, rather than can be followed by either a verb in the past tense if the two verbs are parallel, or an infinitive if something yet to happen is implied. Examples: He was pitied rather than disliked by his friends.He was pitied rather than disliked by his friends. He likes starting early rather than staying late.He likes starting early rather than staying late. Why don’t you wear the black shoes rather than the brown ones?Why don’t you wear the black shoes rather than the brown ones? I’d like to stay at home this evening rather than go/to go/going out.I’d like to stay at home this evening rather than go/to go/going out. Rather than cause trouble, he left. (when rather than is put at the beginning of the sentence, it’s followed by v+ing or verb without to)Rather than cause trouble, he left. (when rather than is put at the beginning of the sentence, it’s followed by v+ing or verb without to) I prefer to work rather thanremain idle. (prefer to rather than is followed by verb without to)I prefer to work rather than remain idle. (prefer to rather than is followed by verb without to)

19 2 I’ve tried desperately to explain to my students that the image they have of me as an enthusiastic devotee of books and homework during my adolescence was a bit out of focus. On the contrary, I hated compulsory education with a passion. I could never quite accept the notion of having to go to school while the fish were biting. the image they have of me as an enthusiastic devotee of books and homework during my adolescence was a bit out of focus.while the fish were bitingthe image they have of me as an enthusiastic devotee of books and homework during my adolescence was a bit out of focus.while the fish were biting 3 But in my sophomore year, something beautiful and exciting happened. Cupid aimed his arrow and struck me right in the heart. All at once, I enjoyed going to school, if only to gaze at the lovely face in English II. Cupid aimed his arrow and struck me right in the heart.if only to gaze at the lovely face in English II.Cupid aimed his arrow and struck me right in the heart.if only to gaze at the lovely face in English II. Language Points

20 … the image they have of me as an enthusiastic devotee of books and homework during my adolescence was a bit out of focus. devotee n. —a person who strongly admires a particular person or extremely interested in sth. Examples: The hotel was surrounded by a large crowd of devotees of the movie star.The hotel was surrounded by a large crowd of devotees of the movie star. adolescence n. —a period between childhood and adulthood Examples: The author describes his joys and sorrow of his adolescence.The author describes his joys and sorrow of his adolescence. out of focus — not sharply defined Examples: The children’s faces were badly out of focus in the photograph.The children’s faces were badly out of focus in the photograph. Though I’ve known him for several years, his personality is still a bit out of focus to me.Though I’ve known him for several years, his personality is still a bit out of focus to me.Paraphrase Who else would ever grow up to be a teacher at all except a bookworm who, unlike other kids, likes to study but not to play? the image they have of me = the image of me which they have

21 … while the fish were biting Paraphrase when it was time to play Idioms with “fish” fish in troubled waters —to try to take advantage of a confused situation like a fish out of water —completely unfamiliar with one’s surroundings fish or cut bait —to proceed with an activity or abandon it altogether using sth. specific to refer to a series of things in general with which it is associated (synecdoche 提喻 ) Here refer to the pastime of going fishing, or more generally to all pastimes

22 Fish-related Expressions: 鱼竿 fishing rod 鱼钩 fishhook/barb 鱼丸 fish balls 糖醋鱼 sweet & sour fish 清蒸鱼 steamed fresh fish 鱼骨 fishbone

23 Cupid aimed his arrow and struck me right in the heart. Cupid: in Roman mythology, son of Venus, goddess of love. His counterpart in Greek mythology was Eros, god of love. He appears as a mischievous boy who indiscriminately wounds both gods and humans with his arrows, thereby causing them to fall deeply in love. Cupid is commonly represented in art as a naked, winged infant, often blindfolded, carrying a bow and a quiver of arrows. Paraphrase? Text-related information I fell in love.

24 … if only to gaze at the lovely face in English II. Make a sentence with “if only to” ? if only to Usage: to introduce what one thinks a fairly good reason for doing something, although one realizes it may not be a very good reason, meaning even if the only reason is... if only to Examples: I’ll have a glass myself, if only to prevent you from drinking it all.I’ll have a glass myself, if only to prevent you from drinking it all. I think you should get a job if only to stop yourself getting so bored at home.I think you should get a job if only to stop yourself getting so bored at home. if only to Translation: 哪怕只是为了...

25 Cf: Only if — (when used at the beginning of a sentence, making the v. in the following clause presence its subject) only on condition that Examples: Only if a teacher has given permission is a student allowed to enter this room.Only if a teacher has given permission is a student allowed to enter this room. Only ifthe red light comes on is there any danger to employees. Only if the red light comes on is there any danger to employees.

26 I. Introduction to the story A misconception: teachers were child prodigies. One example of the author to show how wrong the misconception is: Just like normal kids, I hated compulsory education with a passion. An incident changed the whole course: Cupid’s arrow hit me and I began to enjoy going to school. A misconception: teachers were child prodigies. One example of the author to show how wrong the misconception is: Just like normal kids, I hated compulsory education with a passion. An incident changed the whole course: Cupid’s arrow hit me and I began to enjoy going to school. Reading Analysis

27 Questions to Introduction 1.According to the writer, how do kids see their teachers? 2.How interested was the writer in school before he reached his sophomore year? What changed then? Comprehension As bookworms or prodigies who are interested only in studying. He hated school before his sophomore year, but then he developed a crush on Debbie. Since she seemed to him to be an “intellectual”, his feelings for her motivated him to pay attention to learning.

28 II.The whole story The beginning of the story The beginning of the story The beginning of the story The beginning of the story The major part of the story The major part of the story The major part of the story The major part of the story The ending of the story The ending of the story The ending of the story The ending of the story Para. 4-7 Paras Para Para Reading Analysis

29 4 My princess sat near the pencil sharpener, and that year I ground up enough pencils to fuel a campfire. Alas, Debbie was far beyond my wildest dreams. We were separated not only by five rows of desks, but by about 50 I.Q. points. She was the top student in English II, the apple of Mrs. Larrivee’s eye. and that year I ground up enough pencils to fuel a campfire.far beyond my wildest dreamsWe were separated not only by five rows of desks, but by about 50 I.Q. points.the apple of Mrs. Larrivee’s eyeand that year I ground up enough pencils to fuel a campfire.far beyond my wildest dreamsWe were separated not only by five rows of desks, but by about 50 I.Q. points.the apple of Mrs. Larrivee’s eye 5 Occasionally, Debbie would catch me staring at her, and she would flash a smile that radiated intelligence and quickened my heartbeat. It was a smile that signaled hope and made me temporarily forget the intellectual gulf that separated us. intellectual gulfintellectual gulf Language Points

30 ... and that year I ground up enough pencils to fuel a campfire. Question 1: What does the sentence mean? Question 2: Why did the author grind so many pencils?

31 beyond my wildest dreams —(in a way that is) better than what one expected or hoped for Examples: The salary was beyond my wildest dreams. The salary was beyond my wildest dreams. Translate:得到一台计算机的生日礼物远远超出了我的期望。 Key: A computer as my birthday gift is far beyond my wildest dreams.

32 We were separated not only by five rows of desks, but by about 50 I.Q. points. Translate into Chinese : ? Key: 将我们隔开不仅有五排课桌,还有约 50 分的智商。

33 We were separated not only by five rows of desks, but by about 50 I.Q. points. I. Q. = intelligence quotient, an index of measurement of the intelligence level of both children and adults, with a normal standard of 100 The distribution of IQ scores on the Weschsler Adult Intelligence Scale follows an approximately normal curve, an average distribution of values. The test is regularly adjusted so that the median score is that is, so that half of the scores fall above 100, and half fall below Text-related information

34 the apple of one’s eye —a person or thing that is the main object of sb.’s love and attention Examples: Alice is the apple of her parents’ eye. Alice is the apple of her parents’ eye. Translate: The girls in the class were rather hostile to Jenny simply because she was the apple of their teacher’s eye. Key:班里的女孩对简尼怀有敌意,就因为她是老师的宝贝。

35 radiate —send out rays (light or heat); (fig.) give forth a feeling of 情感的流露,显出 Eg. Her face radiatesconfidence. 满脸自信 Eg. Her face radiates confidence. 满脸自信 She radiates joy. 洋溢喜悦 She radiates joy. 洋溢喜悦 flash a smile that radiated intelligence and quickened my heartbeat —give a brief smile which showed intelligence and made me feel excited. flash a smile/glance/look at sb. —smile or look at sb. quickly and for a short time

36 intellectual gulf —difference in mental ability gulf n. —area of division or difference, esp. between opinions Examples: There is a widening gulf between the middle classes and the poorest sections of society.There is a widening gulf between the middle classes and the poorest sections of society. It is hoped that the peace plan will bridge the gulf between the government and the rebels.It is hoped that the peace plan will bridge the gulf between the government and the rebels. scheme —make clever dishonest planes, plot 图谋,密 谋 bridge the gap/gulf between —reduce or get rid of the difference between two things 弥合差距 An attempt at bridging the economic gap betweenNorth and South. 旨在弥合南北经济差距的努力 An attempt at bridging the economic gap between North and South. 旨在弥合南北经济差距的努力

37 6 I schemed desperately to bridge that gulf. And one day, as I was passing the supermarket, an idea came to me. A sign in the window announced that the store was offering the first volume of a set of encyclopedias at the special price of 29 cents. The remaining volumes would cost $2.49 each. schemedvolumeschemedvolume 7 I purchased Volume I — Aardvark to Asteroid — and began my venture into the world of knowledge. I would henceforth become a seeker of facts. I would become Chief Brain in English II and sweep my princess off her feet with a surge of erudition. I had it all planned. AardvarkAsteroid venturehenceforthI would become Chief Brain in English II and sweep my princess off her feet with a surge of erudition.AardvarkAsteroid venturehenceforthI would become Chief Brain in English II and sweep my princess off her feet with a surge of erudition. Language Points

38 scheme v. make plans (for); plan in a deceitful way n.1. a formal, official or business plan 2. a clever, dishonest plan Examples: Behind the scenes, a small group was scheming to remove the chairman from office.Behind the scenes, a small group was scheming to remove the chairman from office. The government’s Youth Training Scheme soon ran into difficulties.The government’s Youth Training Scheme soon ran into difficulties. The criminal was planning a scheme to rob the bank.The criminal was planning a scheme to rob the bank.

39 volume n. 1. one of a set of books of the same kind ( 一套书的 ) 一册、 一卷 2. (of) 体积;容积 3. 音量 Examples: I have a set of Dickens’ works in 24 volumes.I have a set of Dickens’ works in 24 volumes. The tank has a volume of 4,000 cubic feet (立方英尺).The tank has a volume of 4,000 cubic feet (立方英尺). She turned down the volume on the TV.She turned down the volume on the TV.

40 aardvark n. —(Afrikaans for “earth pig”), common name for a burrowing, ant-eating mammal. The aardvark is found throughout much of Africa, from the southern part of Egypt to the Cape of Good Hope 土豚,非洲食蚁兽 Text-related information

41 asteroid n. —one of the many small or minor planets that are members of the solar system; starfish 小行星;海星 Text-related information

42 venture n. —a plan of action, esp. in business, which is new and might be difficult and so involves uncertainty or the risk of failure. Examples: She had three divorces and this is her fourth matrimonial (婚姻的) venture.She had three divorces and this is her fourth matrimonial (婚姻的) venture. We are looking abroad for more profitable business ventures.We are looking abroad for more profitable business ventures.

43 henceforth ad. —from this time onwards Examples: The governor declared that, henceforth, the first of June would be a holiday.The governor declared that, henceforth, the first of June would be a holiday. The memo 公务便条 said, “Henceforth, all salary raises must be approved by the president.”The memo 公务便条 said, “Henceforth, all salary raises must be approved by the president.” Chief Brain —person who is intelligent ( part for whole, synecdoche 提喻 ) surge —(1) a forward rolling movement like a wave 波涛汹 涌 (2) a sudden, large increase in a feeling, demand, profit, interest, etc. (2) a sudden, large increase in a feeling, demand, profit, interest, etc.

44 I would become Chief Brain in English II and sweep my princess off her feet with a surge of erudition. erudition n. —much of specialist knowledge e.g.The debate requires not only skills of speech but also erudition on the subject. Paraphrase: I would become the most intelligent person in English II, and would impress her and make her feel attracted to me with a sudden and great increase in my learning. sweep sb. off his/her feet — make sb. feel suddenly and strongly attracted to you in a romantic way Examples: John was swept off his feet by the appearance of a beautiful girl at his door.John was swept off his feet by the appearance of a beautiful girl at his door. She was swept off her feet by this fun-loving youth.She was swept off her feet by this fun-loving youth.

45 The beginning of the story ( Par. 4 -7) It was Debbie, a top student and the apple of the teacher’s eye, who was the princes of my heart. As she came into my life, I felt the intellectual gulf between her and me. A strong will developed in me to bridge the gulf: With a volume of encyclopedia, I ventured into the world of knowledge to become a Chief Brain so as to sweep my princess off her feet with a surge of erudition. Reading Analysis

46 Question to the Beginning 3.Why did the writer decide to buy the first volume of a set of encyclopedias? Because he thought that by learning everything in it he could impress Debbie.

47 8 My first opportunity came one day in the cafeteria line. I looked behind me and there she was. 9 “Hi,” she said. 10 After a pause, I wet my lips and said, “Know where anchovies come from?” anchovies 11 She seemed surprised. “No, I don’t.” 12 I breathed a sigh of relief. “The anchovy lives in salt water and is rarely found in fresh water.” I had to talk fast, so that I could get all the facts in before we reached the cash register. “Fishermen catch anchovies in the Mediterranean Sea and along the Atlantic coast near Spain and Portugal.” I breathed a sigh of relief.get all the facts in I breathed a sigh of relief.get all the facts in Language Points

48 anchovy n. — any of several small, bony, schooling fishes related to the herring. One of the world’s most important commercial fishes, the anchovy population off Chile and Peru has been severely depleted in the last several years by over-fishing and climatic changes 鳀鱼,凤尾鱼 Text-related information

49 I breathed a sigh of relief. relief n. — feeling of comfort at the end of anxiety, fear, or pain Examples: This medicine will give a little relief.This medicine will give a little relief. It was a great relief to me when I heard he was safe.It was a great relief to me when I heard he was safe. Note:Relief also refers to money, clothing, food and other aid that is made available to help poor people or people who are victims of a disaster. Translate the sentence: ?Key:我松了口气。

50 get sth. in — manage to say sth. about a subject Examples: I’ll get my suggestion in at the start of the meeting.I’ll get my suggestion in at the start of the meeting. John talks so much that it’s impossible to get a word in (插话).John talks so much that it’s impossible to get a word in (插话).

51 13 “How fascinating,” said Debbie, shaking her head in disbelief. It was obvious that I had made quite an impression. 14 A few days later, during a fire drill, I casually went up to her and asked, “Ever been to the Aleutian Islands?” the Aleutian Islandsthe Aleutian Islands 15 “Never have,” she replied. 16 “Might be a nice place to visit, but I certainly wouldn’t want to live there,” I said. 17 “Why not?” said Debbie, playing right into my hands. playing right into my handsplaying right into my hands Language Points

52 The Aleutian Islands are a chain of volcanic islands of southwest Alaska, U.S.A. Characterized by fairly uniform temperatures, high winds, heavy rainfall, and persistent fog, the Aleutians are practically without trees but covered with a luxuriant growth of grasses, sedges, and many flowering plants. Text-related information

53 play right into one’s hands — do something which gives sb. an advantage; help sb. who is one’s opponent against oneself Examples: In the basketball game, Jerry’s foul 犯规动作 played right into the opponents’ hands.In the basketball game, Jerry’s foul 犯规动作 played right into the opponents’ hands. Mary and Bobby both wanted the last piece of cake, but Bobby played into Mary’s hands by trying to grab it. (Father gave the cake to Mary because Bobby tried to grab it.)Mary and Bobby both wanted the last piece of cake, but Bobby played into Mary’s hands by trying to grab it. (Father gave the cake to Mary because Bobby tried to grab it.) “Why not?” said Debbie, playing right into my hands — “would you certainly not want to live there?” said Debbie, asking the exact question I needed to show off what I knew about the Aleutian Islands.

54 18 “Well, the climate is forbidding. There are no trees on any of the 100 or more islands in the group. The ground is rocky and very little plant life can grow on it.” 19 “I don’t think I’d even care to visit,” she said. 20 The fire drill was over and we began to file into the building, so I had to step it up to get the natives in. “The Aleuts are short and sturdy and have dark skin and black hair. They live on fish, and they trap blue foxes and seals for their valuable fur.” file into the buildingstep it upsealsfile into the buildingstep it upseals Language Points

55 step it up —(infml) increase the size or speed of ( 非正式语 ) 加快 ; 增加 Examples: The police are stepping up their efforts to fight crime.The police are stepping up their efforts to fight crime. The pace of the reforms is being stepped up.The pace of the reforms is being stepped up.

56 seal n.1 )海豹 ; 2 )印记,印章 vt.1 )盖章于; 2 )封,密封 Examples: Some seals can bark like a dog.Some seals can bark like a dog. The flap (信封口盖) of the envelope has the company’s seal on it.The flap (信封口盖) of the envelope has the company’s seal on it. The secretary sealed (= stamped an official mark on) the company’s official letters.The secretary sealed (= stamped an official mark on) the company’s official letters. If you want to keep the jam 果酱 for a long time, you must seal the jar 广口瓶 well.If you want to keep the jam 果酱 for a long time, you must seal the jar 广口瓶 well.

57 21 Debbie’s eyes widened in amazement. 22 One day I was browsing through the library. I spotted Debbie sitting at a table, absorbed in a crossword puzzle. She was frowning, apparently stumped on a word. I leaned over and asked if I could help. stumped 23 “Four-letter word for Oriental female servant,” Debbie said. 24 “Try amah,” I said, quick as a flash. 25 Debbie filled in the blanks, then turned to stare at me in amazement. “I don’t believe it,” she said. “I just don’t believe it.” Language Points

58 spot sb. doing sth. He spotted someone coming out of the building. spot —notice sth., esp sth. that is difficult to see, or that you are looking for difficult/easy to spot He is very tall, so he’s easy to spot in a crowd. 个子高,在 人群中容易被认出来

59 stump vt.—put an unanswerable question to; puzzle 把 … 难住,难倒 Stump as a verb that means “puzzle” has its origin in the stumps (树桩) that American settlers had to pull from the earth after felling 砍伐 trees – some stumps were so big and deep-rooted that the pioneers didn’t know what to do. They stumped them.Stump as a verb that means “puzzle” has its origin in the stumps (树桩) that American settlers had to pull from the earth after felling 砍伐 trees – some stumps were so big and deep-rooted that the pioneers didn’t know what to do. They stumped them. Examples: The question has stumped philosophers since the beginning of time.The question has stumped philosophers since the beginning of time. be stumped We’re all completely stumped — we can’t work out how he escaped. Key: 我们都困惑不解 — 想不出他到底是怎样逃掉的。 get/have sb. stumped This question will have them all stumped. 这个问题会把他们都难住的

60 26 And so it went, that glorious, joyous, romantic sophomore year. Debbie seemed to relish our little conversations and hung on my every word. Naturally, the more I read, the more my confidence grew. And so it went, that glorious, joyous, romantic sophomore year.relishhung on my every word And so it went, that glorious, joyous, romantic sophomore year.relishhung on my every word 27 In the classroom, too, I was gradually making my presence felt. One day, during a discussion of Coleridge’s “The Ancient Mariner”, we came across the word albatross. making my presence feltColeridgemaking my presence feltColeridge 28 “Can anyone tell us what an albatross is?” asked Mrs. Larrivee. Language Points

61 And so it went, that glorious, joyous, romantic sophomore year. (“it” is used in the subject position to make a statement about time to which the following noun phrase is in apposition) Question 1: What does the “it” stand for? Question 2: The word “went” could be best replaced by ____. A) escapedB) moved C) passed byD) traveled Translate into Chinese: ? Key: 那个光辉灿烂的、充满欢乐的、富有浪漫色彩的二年 级就这样继续着。 Cf: joyous/joyful A joyous song (apply to sth. that is by nature filled with joy ) A joyful child (suggests an emotional reaction to a situation that calls forth a feeling of happiness and contentment)

62 relish vt. get pleasure out of, enjoy greatly n. If you do something with relish, you do it eagerly and with a lot of enjoyment. Examples: My grandmother has always relished life.My grandmother has always relished life. The reporter seemed to relish asking all those personal questions.The reporter seemed to relish asking all those personal questions. Kate lit a cigarette and inhaled 深深吸入 with relish.Kate lit a cigarette and inhaled 深深吸入 with relish. Charles described with great relish how he got his revenge on Malcolm.Charles described with great relish how he got his revenge on Malcolm.

63 hang on (sb.’s words) — listen very carefully to sb. Examples: Ann hangs on every word of her history teacher and takes very careful notes.Ann hangs on every word of her history teacher and takes very careful notes. He told them stories around the campfire, the boys hanging fascinated on his words.He told them stories around the campfire, the boys hanging fascinated on his words.

64 making my presence felt The make + noun/pronoun + past participle structure is used when the logical subject of the verb in the past participle form is unknown, less important or when it involves the general public or people in general.The make + noun/pronoun + past participle structure is used when the logical subject of the verb in the past participle form is unknown, less important or when it involves the general public or people in general. Examples: They went to the Ambassador 大使 to make themselves known to him.They went to the Ambassador 大使 to make themselves known to him. I can make myself understood in French.I can make myself understood in French. She had to shout to make herself heard above the sound of the music.She had to shout to make herself heard above the sound of the music.

65 Coleridge was an English lyrical poet, critic, and philosopher. His Lyrical Ballads, written with William Wordsworth, heralded ( 预示 ) the English Romantic movement, and his Biographia Literaria (1817) is the most significant work of general literary criticism produced in the English Romantic period. Samuel Taylor Coleridge 柯尔律治(1772—1834) Text-related information

66 29 My hand shot up. “The albatross is a large bird that lives mostly in the ocean regions below the equator, but may be found in the north Pacific as well. The albatross measures as long as four feet and has the greatest wingspread of any bird. It feeds on fish and shellfish. The albatross has an enormous appetite, and when it’s full it has trouble getting into the air again.” appetite 30 There was a long silence in the room. Mrs. Larrivee couldn’t quite believe what she had just heard. I sneaked a look at Debbie and gave her a big wink. She beamed proudly and winked back. sneaked a look atsneaked a look at Language Points

67 The 3.4 m wingspan of the wandering albatross, one of the largest birds, is an adaptation allowing long distance flight over vast expanses of open ocean. The wandering albatross lives for up to 30 years and may not breed until the age of 15, when a single egg is laid and incubated for 65 to 79 days. Albatross信天翁 Text-related information

68 shoot up —— increase quickly, climb Examples: Prices have shot up recently.Prices have shot up recently. You shot up. (grow taller quickly)You shot up. (grow taller quickly)

69 appetite n. 1. one’s desire to eat and one’s feeling about how much to eat 2. (for) a strong desire Examples: The child’s appetite was ruined by too much candy.The child’s appetite was ruined by too much candy. The stout man has a large appetite.The stout man has a large appetite. He has an enormous appetite for classical music.He has an enormous appetite for classical music. The public has an insatiable (=extremely strong) appetite for scandal (丑闻) and political controversy (争议).The public has an insatiable (=extremely strong) appetite for scandal (丑闻) and political controversy (争议).

70 sneak a look/glance at — look secretly and quickly at sth., esp. sth. that you are not supposed to see sneak in/past/around etc sneak sth through/by/past etc. sneak sth. from Examples: sneak a chocolate from the boxsneak a chocolate from the box sneak a look through the keyholesneak a look through the keyhole They managed to sneak past the guard on the gate. 设 法蹑手蹑脚地从门卫身边溜了过去They managed to sneak past the guard on the gate. 设 法蹑手蹑脚地从门卫身边溜了过去

71 wink at — close and open one’s eye quickly, usually to communicate amusement or secret message 使眼色,眨眼 示意 wink at — pretend not to notice something bad or illegal, in a way that suggests you approve of it (对非法事)睁一 只眼闭一只眼,假装没有看见 not get a wink of sleep/ not sleep a wink — not be able to sleep at all 无法入睡 tip sb. the wink — secretly warn someone about something or give them information 暗中警告某人,向 … 透 露消息 quick as a wink — very quickly (AmE) 霎时间,一眨眼

72 The major parts of the story ( Par. 8 – 30 ) There are four episodes: Episode 1: Effects: Episode 2: Effects: Episode 3: Effects: Episode 4: Effects: There are four episodes: Episode 1: Effects: Episode 2: Effects: Episode 3: Effects: Episode 4: Effects: I told her about whats and hows of anchovies. I made quite an impression on her. I told her about Aleutian Islands and the Aleuts. Debbie’s eyes widened in amazement. I helped her with a crossword puzzle. This took my princess’s breath away. I talked in detail about the albatross in class. My knowledge surprised everyone, including the teacher. Reading Analysis

73 4.How did the writer manage to make his first impression on Debbie? What was her reaction? In the cafeteria line, he told her what he’d learned about anchovies from the encyclopedia. She was amazed and impressed. Questions to the Major Part

74 5.What other opportunities did the writer find to impress Debbie? 6.What effect did his continued reading have on him? The more he read, the more his confidence grew. He approached her during a fire drill and told her about the Aleutian Islands; he helped her with a crossword puzzle in the library; he defined the word albatross during a classroom discussion. Questions to the Major Part

75 7.Why couldn’t Mrs. Larrivee quite believe what she had heard when the writer defined the word “albatross”? Because the writer had never before been an outstanding student; and because -- as is implied -- his definition was much more detailed than one would normally expect. Questions to the Major Part

76 31 What I failed to perceive was that Debbie all this while was going steady with a junior from a neighboring school — a basketball player with a C+ average. The revelation hit me hard, and for a while I felt like forgetting everything I had learned. I had saved enough money to buy Volume II — Asthma to Bullfinch — but was strongly tempted to invest in a basketball instead. perceivegoing steady withrevelationBullfinchperceivegoing steady withrevelationBullfinch 32 I felt not only hurt, but betrayed. Like Agamemnon, but with less drastic consequences, thank God. betrayedLike Agamemnon, but with less drastic consequences, thank God.betrayedLike Agamemnon, but with less drastic consequences, thank God. Language Points

77 perceive vt. — notice, be conscious of Examples: If you perceive something, you see, notice or become aware of it, esp. when it is not obvious to other people.If you perceive something, you see, notice or become aware of it, esp. when it is not obvious to other people. I perceived a note of unhappiness in her voice.I perceived a note of unhappiness in her voice. He wasn’t able to perceive the danger of their situation.He wasn’t able to perceive the danger of their situation.

78 go steady with sb. — date sb. regularly and exclusively Examples: They’d been going steady with each other for three years before they got married.They’d been going steady with each other for three years before they got married.

79 revelation n. — the act of revealing sth., usually of great significance Examples: The revelation that the world is round surprised them.The revelation that the world is round surprised them. This is quite a revelation to me; I had no idea that you were a priest 神父,牧师.This is quite a revelation to me; I had no idea that you were a priest 神父,牧师.

80 bullfinch红腹灰雀 Text-related information

81 betray vt. —be disloyal or unfaithful to Examples: I thought he was too good to betray his friends.I thought he was too good to betray his friends. The general betrayed his country by giving away vital military secrets.The general betrayed his country by giving away vital military secrets. To betray some information, especially a secret, is to make it known. Examples: He betrayed the news to all his friends. He betrayed the news to all his friends. If someone betrays your trust, they make you question your confidence in them. Examples: By failing to fulfill his promise, he has betrayed my trust.By failing to fulfill his promise, he has betrayed my trust. To betray one’s feelings, thoughts or a particular characteristic is to show them without intending to. Examples: Her red face betrayed her nervousness.Her red face betrayed her nervousness. Although she often seems quite cold and harsh, her smiling eyes betray her true nature.Although she often seems quite cold and harsh, her smiling eyes betray her true nature.

82 Like Agamemnon, but with less drastic consequences, thank God. Agamemnon 阿伽门农 Agamemnon was, in Greek mythology, king of Mycenae, and commander of the Greek forces in the Trojan War. After a ten-year siege (围困), Troy fell and Agamemnon returned in triumph to Mycenae. His wife Clytemnestra greeted him with words of love, but while he was in his bath she killed him with the assistance of her lover. His death was avenged (复仇) seven years later by his son Orestes. Paraphrase: I felt like Agamemnon, but, luckily enough, things did not end up as drastically as with Agamemnon — I was not killed. Text-related information

83 33 In time I recovered from my wounds. The next year Debbie moved from the neighborhood and transferred to another school. Soon she became no more than a memory. In timeno more than In timeno more than Language Points

84 in time — 1) eventually 2) at or before the right or necessary time Examples: Fred and Jim did not like each other at first, but in time they became friends.Fred and Jim did not like each other at first, but in time they became friends. Will you be home in time to see the children before they go to bed?Will you be home in time to see the children before they go to bed?

85 no more than —just, only The phrase no more than is used to emphasize that someone or something is not very important, valuable or impressive, or that they are hardly worth considering.The phrase no more than is used to emphasize that someone or something is not very important, valuable or impressive, or that they are hardly worth considering. Examples: They thought slaves were no more than commodities 商 品.They thought slaves were no more than commodities 商 品. The white sails were no more than a speck 小斑点 upon the waters.The white sails were no more than a speck 小斑点 upon the waters.

86 Reading Analysis The ending of the story ( Par ) While I was successful in my efforts to bridge the intellectual gap between Debbie and me, I failed to perceive that she was going steady with a basketball player. I felt hurt and betrayed. Then the next year Debbie was transferred to another school and she became only a memory. In time I recovered from my wounds.

87 9.Why did he feel “strongly tempted to invest in a basketball”? Questions to the Ending Because he still wanted to impress Debbie, and he now felt that athletic ability was the best way to do that. 8.What was it that the author had failed to perceive about Debbie? How did he feel when it finally came to his attention? That she was going steady with a junior from a neighboring school -- a basketball player with a C+ average. The revelation hit him hard, and for a while he felt like forgetting everything he had learned.

88 34 Although the original incentive was gone, I continued poring over the encyclopedias, as well as an increasing number of other books. Having tasted of the wine of knowledge, I could not now alter my course. For: incentiveporing over Having tasted of the wine of knowledge, I could not now alter my course.incentiveporing over Having tasted of the wine of knowledge, I could not now alter my course. “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing: Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.” the Pierian springthe Pierian spring So wrote Alexander Pope, Volume XIV — Paprika to Pterodactyl. Alexander PopePaprikaPterodactylAlexander PopePaprikaPterodactyl

89 incentive n. —encouragement to greater activity, motivating factor, stimulus Cf. incentive vs. stimulus Incentive means a stimulus to action, but incentive applies to a cause which encourages action or activity while stimulus refers to something, either physiological 生理 or psychological, that causes a reaction or growth.Incentive means a stimulus to action, but incentive applies to a cause which encourages action or activity while stimulus refers to something, either physiological 生理 or psychological, that causes a reaction or growth. Examples: Our bonus 奖金,红利 payments provide an incentive to work harder.Our bonus 奖金,红利 payments provide an incentive to work harder. Tax incentives 减税优惠 have been very effective in encouraging people to save or invest more of their income.Tax incentives 减税优惠 have been very effective in encouraging people to save or invest more of their income. The tip of the tongue is sensitive to salt and sweet stimuli.The tip of the tongue is sensitive to salt and sweet stimuli. Foreign investment has been a stimulus to the industry.Foreign investment has been a stimulus to the industry.

90 pore over —study or give close attention to Examples: Bill pored over his notes the night before the exam.Bill pored over his notes the night before the exam. The architect 设计师 pored over his designs carefully.The architect 设计师 pored over his designs carefully.

91 Having tasted of the wine of knowledge, I could not now alter my course. Paraphrase:? Having experienced the power of knowledge, I could not bring myself to stop reading. The two expressions tasted of the wine of knowledge and alter my course are figures of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is compared to another to suggest a likeness between them. “Knowledge” here is compared to good wine and “course” to his life and career.

92 Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring — Learning intensively, or give up learning at all the Pierian spring — (Greek mythology) a spring considered a source of inspiration; drinking its water is supposed to give poetic inspiration.the Pierian spring — (Greek mythology) a spring considered a source of inspiration; drinking its water is supposed to give poetic inspiration. taste of — have perception, experience or enjoyment of 尝到味道,经受,领略 He tasted offame the first time in his life when the record made a hit 一举成名.He tasted of fame the first time in his life when the record made a hit 一举成名. She didn’t want to lose the freedom she had tasted of.She didn’t want to lose the freedom she had tasted of.

93 English poet Alexander Pope is known for the brilliant verse and stinging satire he wrote during the early and mid-18th century. Pope emulated the classical style of the poets of antiquity and further developed the poetic form known as the heroic couplet. He first earned fame with the work An Essay on Criticism (1711), in which he wrote the now famous line, “To err is human, to forgive divine.” Alexander Pope 柏蒲 ( ) ( ) Text-related information

94 The pterosaurs were the first noninsect animals to develop flapping flight. Evidence suggests that some pterosaurs were partially warm-blooded. Pterosaurs flew in prehistoric skies beginning in the Triassic Period ( 三叠纪 ) and continuing through the Jurassic Period ( 侏罗纪 ) until their extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period ( 白垩纪 ). Triassic PeriodJurassic PeriodCretaceous PeriodTriassic PeriodJurassic PeriodCretaceous Period pterodactyl翼手龙 Text-related information

95 Reading Analysis III. The after events of the story ( Par. 34) The story was over and the original incentive was gone. But the event changed the whole course of my life: the pursuit for knowledge became ongoing and I got smart by continuing to pore over encyclopedias.

96 10.After Debbie was gone, what was the writer’s probable incentive for continuing to read the encyclopedias? His own satisfaction, intellectual curiosity and the feeling of confidence he got from his learning. Questions to the Ending

97 Listening Check-up Directions:Listen to the following conversation twice and then answer some questions. Understand the following new words before listening deprivefatal a bunch of devastate 剥夺 致命的 一串 破坏

98 Laura — L Jennifer — J Laura — L Jennifer — J Laura [singing]: “ I could have danced all night, I could have danced all night ” Jennifer: What! You ’ re in love again? L: 1)__________________________________________[singing] “ I could have spread my wings and done a thousand things. ” J: If I recall correctly, that ’ s what you ’ ve said every time. L: Ha! I didn ’ t know what I was talking about. This is true love at last! There ’ s no mistaking it. J: Fascinating. From a scientific standpoint, of course, this is simply a consequence of your brain ’ s chemistry. L: 2)__________________________________________________ _____________________________ Listening No, not “ again ” at last! This time it ’ s for real. What? Chemistry? Chemistry has nothing to do with it. How can you say such ugly things?

99 J: 3)___________________ A Nobel-Prize-winning scientist named Niels Jeme says the human search for a mate is actually a search for immune-system compatibility. Our genes as strong as possible. And we use our noses to do it. L: 4)__________________________ J: 5)_______ When we fall in love, it ’ s a response to odors we aren ’ t conscious of. But our genes know that those odors are signals that the person ’ s immune system is compatible with ours. L: 6)____________ J: 7)__________ These odors trigger subconscious reactions in the brain chemistry that cause the feelings we call “ falling in love ”. L: You know what I think? I think that scientist has never been in love. Listening It isn ’ t ugly. It ’ s true. Our noses? That ’ s ridiculous. It isn ’ t! That ’ s crazy! No, it ’ s not. Questions

100 Answer the following questions 1.Why was Laura happy? 2.What did Laura think of this love experience? 3.What did Jennifer think of Laura’s love experience? 4.How did Jennifer explain the scientist’s ideas about love? 5.What did Laura say in response to the scientist’s opinion? 6.What was Laura’s comment about the scientist? Listen once more. Listen once more. Listen once more. Listen once more.Listening

101 1.Do you think that making music and art ___________ subjects in schools may reduce some children’s enjoyment of them? 2.Bob’s one of those people who ___________ risk and danger – he’d be bored in a safe, steady job. III.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. compulsory relish compulsoryrelish confidenceconsequenceincentive perceiveinvest henceforthschemepassion Vocabulary

102 3.Elizabeth’s certainly talented enough to succeed in her career; she just doesn’t have enough ___________ in her own abilities. 4.I’m sorry you’re in trouble, but you made your decision on your own and you’ll just have to face the ________________. confidence consequences Vocabulary III.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. compulsoryrelish confidenceconsequenceincentive perceiveinvest henceforthschemepassion

103 Vocabulary III.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. compulsoryrelish confidenceconsequenceincentive perceiveinvest henceforthschemepassion 5.Many educators would be delighted to abolish exams, but worry that without them there would be too little ___________ for students to work hard. 6.The teacher accidentally hit the boy’s hand with an eraser and was ___________ known as “Dead-Eye Bean”. incentive henceforth

104 Vocabulary III.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. compulsoryrelishconfidenceconsequenceincentive perceiveinvesthenceforthschemepassion 7.If I had money, I’d ___________ it all in Internet companies. 8.Psychologists say that our behavior is influenced by many factors too subtle for us to consciously ___________. invest perceive

105 Vocabulary compulsoryrelish confidenceconsequenceincentive perceiveinvest henceforthschemepassion 9.He’s always had a ___________ for books. If he could work in a library, it would be a dream come true. 10.Look at those three whispering in the corner again – they’re ___________ something, I just don’t know what! passion scheming III.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary.

106 IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well. 1.Lily has been dating Richard regularly and exclusively for three years now. I think it’s true love. going steady with Richard Vocabulary

107 2.Fred and Jim didn’t like each other at first, but eventually they became good friends. in time Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well.

108 3.By leading his army into the valley, the general gave his enemy the advantage. played into his enemy’s hands Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well.

109 4.It was much more than she could have expected that more than a hundred thousand copies of her recent novel were sold in three months. beyond her wildest dreams Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well.

110 5.Did you notice how Ann listened attentively to Michael all evening? Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well. hung on Michael’s every word

111 6.The photos he took at the conference are so blurred that I can’t tell who’s who. Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well. out of focus

112 7.What do albatrosses eat when shellfish are out of season? feed on Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well.

113 8.That car is the main object of Chris’s attention — he’ll be devastated when he hears you scratched the paint. Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well. the apple of Chris’s eye

114 9.The prisoners entered the courtroom in a line with their heads down and without even glancing at the crowd of excited journalists. Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well. filed into the courtroom

115 10.She used to be fascinated by butterflies—she would spend hours in the museum studying their collection in detail. Vocabulary IV. Replace the colored words with phrases or expressions from the text that best keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes as well. poring over their collection

116 Vocabulary 1.If you wanted to show your admiration for someone just by looking at them, how would you do it? V. Use the words in the box — and your imagination — to briefly complete the thoughts below. You don’t have to use all the words, an your answers can be more than on sentence, but make sure you include at least one of the words in each sentence you write. casualcafeteriafrownOrientalsturdy beambetrayromanticreliefrevelation gazeglorioussighstumpwiden Reference:gaze, beam, widen

117 Vocabulary 2.If you learned your best friend was dating someone you were romantically interested in, how would you express your feelings? V. Use the words in the box — and your imagination — to briefly complete the thoughts below. You don’t have to use all the words, an your answers can be more than on sentence, but make sure you include at least one of the words in each sentence you write. casualcafeteriafrownOrientalsturdy beambetrayromanticreliefrevelation gazeglorioussighstumpwiden Reference:betray, sigh, frown

118 Vocabulary 3.If visitors from another planet asked you to describe what love is, what would you tell them? V. Use the words in the box — and your imagination — to briefly complete the thoughts below. You don’t have to use all the words, an your answers can be more than on sentence, but make sure you include at least one of the words in each sentence you write. casualcafeteriafrownOrientalsturdy beambetrayromanticreliefrevelation gazeglorioussighstumpwiden Reference:glorious, revelation, stump

119 Vocabulary Power Games Animal Grouping How are the animals listed below related to the animals in Text A? Look up each of them in your dictionary, and decide which of the following is most similar to: an albatross, a pterodactyl, a seal or a shark. Then put each new animal in the box where you think it fits best. Band 4 : crane, donkey, eagle, mosquito, pigeon Band 6: cricket, dolphin, owl, penguin, shark, sponge

120 Vocabulary Power Games albatross: (all birds) pterodactyl: (all have wings, but they aren’t birds) seal: seal ( 海豹 ) (all mammals) seal ( 海豹 ) (live both on land and in the water) seal ( 印记,图记 ) (all have other meanings unrelated to animals Shark: (all live underwater) albatross: (all birds) crane ( 鹤, 鹭), eagle ( 鹰 ), pigeon ( 鸽子 ), owl ( 猫头鹰 ), penguin ( 企鹅 ) pterodactyl: (all have wings, but they aren’t birds) mosquito ( 蚊子 ), cricket ( 蟋蟀 ) seal: seal ( 海豹 ) (all mammals) donkey ( 驴 ), dolphin ( 海豚 ) seal ( 海豹 ) (live both on land and in the water) penguin ( 企鹅 ) seal ( 印记,图记 ) (all have other meanings unrelated to animals crane ( 起重机 ), cricket ( 板球 ), sponge ( 海绵状物 ) Shark: (all live underwater) dolphin ( 海豚 ), sponge ( 海绵 )


Download ppt "Preview Your First Love All those exciting and wonderful new emotions —— the way your heart raced when that special person was near 那位特别的人近在身边时的急速心跳所有那些激动人心的新奇感觉."

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