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Get ready for reading quiz. Persuasion & Propaganda Get out your W.N. and consider this question: How is propaganda used to control/persuade the animals.

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Presentation on theme: "Get ready for reading quiz. Persuasion & Propaganda Get out your W.N. and consider this question: How is propaganda used to control/persuade the animals."— Presentation transcript:

1 Get ready for reading quiz

2 Persuasion & Propaganda Get out your W.N. and consider this question: How is propaganda used to control/persuade the animals and their thinking? While answering this question, make your own “Propaganda Log” making note of examples of propaganda used in Animal Farm.

3 Propaganda Log Squealer acts as a propaganda tool for the pigs Squealer acts as a propaganda tool for the pigs Page # What is Said or Done What is Really Happening 52Milk & apples are brainfoodPigs are hogging them 69Napoleon has lots of responsibility; respect him Napoleon conniving, power hungry 70Snowball wasn’t importantNapoleon got rid of him (didn’t want competition for power) 71-72Napoleon never opposed the windmill Only opposed it because it was Snowball’s idea; not his (then he took the credit) 77Being around people is ok; it was never really “wrong” before. Napoleon is changing the rules to fit his agenda. 79Pigs need a quiet place to work Pigs are taking comfort for themselves 80Don’t sleep in beds “WITH SHEETS” Changing rules to benefit them. 89Snowball is a traitor trying to betray us Gives Napoleon someone else to blame for troubles

4 What is persuasion ? An attempt to change opinions and attitudes An attempt to change opinions and attitudes An attempt to change your behavior An attempt to change your behavior EX.: lawyers, advertisements, parents EX.: lawyers, advertisements, parents

5 Attempts at Persuasion Every time you turn on the T.V., open a magazine, turn on the radio, or surf the web someone is trying to persuade you to do something Every time you turn on the T.V., open a magazine, turn on the radio, or surf the web someone is trying to persuade you to do something If you are mathematically minded, count the number of advertisements in a magazine sometime. (did I persuade you to do it?) If you are mathematically minded, count the number of advertisements in a magazine sometime. (did I persuade you to do it?)

6 Persuasion vs. Propaganda Basically, they are both trying to get you to believe what they believe. Basically, they are both trying to get you to believe what they believe. Persuasion is based mainly on a person’s beliefs and they want you to feel the same way. Persuasion is based mainly on a person’s beliefs and they want you to feel the same way. Propaganda is based mainly on a group of peoples beliefs and they are trying to spread information about their cause. ex.: advertisements, organizations, politicians Propaganda is based mainly on a group of peoples beliefs and they are trying to spread information about their cause. ex.: advertisements, organizations, politicians

7 Persuasion and propaganda both rely on emotional appeals. Persuasion and propaganda both rely on emotional appeals. But when emotional appeals ignore logic or reason, they become a poor propaganda device. But when emotional appeals ignore logic or reason, they become a poor propaganda device. A good listener can examine a persuasive statement and identify whether it is logical or not. A good listener can examine a persuasive statement and identify whether it is logical or not. Persuasion vs. Propaganda (continued)

8 Persuasive/Propaganda Techniques Euphemism Euphemism Oversimplification Oversimplification Bandwagon Bandwagon Ad Hominem Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and- effect reasoning Faulty cause-and- effect reasoning Begging the question Begging the question Glittering generalities Glittering generalities Logical fallacies Logical fallacies

9 Euphemism: Attempt to pacify audiences to make an unpleasant reality more acceptable; replacing plain English with deliberately vague jargon to obscure, or soften the meaning. “not a food reduction but a readjustment;” Euphemism: Attempt to pacify audiences to make an unpleasant reality more acceptable; replacing plain English with deliberately vague jargon to obscure, or soften the meaning. “not a food reduction but a readjustment;”

10 Oversimplification: giving a simple solution for a complex problem. Simplification covers the true meaning; “2 wings=2 legs, so birds are four-legged animals.” “Made from recycled paper” (but only 10%). Oversimplification: giving a simple solution for a complex problem. Simplification covers the true meaning; “2 wings=2 legs, so birds are four-legged animals.” “Made from recycled paper” (but only 10%).

11 Bandwagon: do something everyone else is doing; the sheep in Animal Farm chant “four legs good, two legs bad” over and over. When environmentalism became a household word, companies all over the world suddenly became “green.” Bandwagon: do something everyone else is doing; the sheep in Animal Farm chant “four legs good, two legs bad” over and over. When environmentalism became a household word, companies all over the world suddenly became “green.”

12 Ad Hominem (name-calling): attacking the person instead of attacking his argument. For example, "Von Daniken's books about ancient astronauts are worthless because he is a convicted forger and embezzler." (Which is true, but that's not why they're worthless.) Ad Hominem (name-calling): attacking the person instead of attacking his argument. For example, "Von Daniken's books about ancient astronauts are worthless because he is a convicted forger and embezzler." (Which is true, but that's not why they're worthless.)

13 Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning: no logical cause is given or known for the effect; “Milk and apples are brainfood.” “Pigs must sleep in beds.” “Brand X whitens best.” Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning: no logical cause is given or known for the effect; “Milk and apples are brainfood.” “Pigs must sleep in beds.” “Brand X whitens best.”

14 Begging the question: When the truth of a statement is assumed before it is proven. Often, it is avoiding the issue or real issue by just stating the conclusion in a different way. Begging the question: When the truth of a statement is assumed before it is proven. Often, it is avoiding the issue or real issue by just stating the conclusion in a different way.

15 Glittering generalities: is a reverse form of name-calling. Instead of insults, it uses words that generate strong positive emotions-words like "democracy," "patriotism," "motherhood," "science," "progress," "prosperity." Politicians love to speak in these terms. Glittering generalities: is a reverse form of name-calling. Instead of insults, it uses words that generate strong positive emotions-words like "democracy," "patriotism," "motherhood," "science," "progress," "prosperity." Politicians love to speak in these terms.

16 Logical fallacies: Applying logic, one can usually draw a conclusion from one or more established premises. While the premises may be accurate, the conclusion is not. For example, Premise 1: Bill Clinton supports gun control. Premise 2: Communist regimes have always supported gun control. Conclusion: Bill Clinton is a communist. Logical fallacies: Applying logic, one can usually draw a conclusion from one or more established premises. While the premises may be accurate, the conclusion is not. For example, Premise 1: Bill Clinton supports gun control. Premise 2: Communist regimes have always supported gun control. Conclusion: Bill Clinton is a communist.

17 Name that Propaganda Technique Game Show Time

18 Name that Propaganda Technique Glittering Generalities EuphemismOversimplificationBandwagon Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning Begging the question Glittering generalities Logical fallacies

19 Name that Propaganda Technique Bandwagon (everyone chews their gum) EuphemismOversimplificationBandwagon Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning Begging the question Glittering generalities Logical fallacies

20 Name that Propaganda Technique Ad Hominem (attacks Best Buy) EuphemismOversimplificationBandwagon Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning Begging the question Glittering generalities Logical fallacies

21 Name that Propaganda Technique Over- simplification EuphemismOversimplificationBandwagon Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning Begging the question Glittering generalities Logical fallacies

22 Name that Propaganda Technique Glittering Generalities EuphemismOversimplificationBandwagon Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning Begging the question Glittering generalities Logical fallacies

23 Name that Propaganda Technique Faulty Cause and Effect Reasoning Glittering Generalities Ad HominemFaulty Cause and Effect Reasoning Glittering Generalities Ad Hominem EuphemismOversimplificationBandwagon Ad Hominem Faulty cause-and-effect reasoning Begging the question Glittering generalities Logical fallacies

24 Works Cited Landoll, Sally. “Evaluating a Speaker’s Reasoning.” Retrieved April 18 th, 2006 from New%20Webpage/Persuasion2.ppt Landoll, Sally. “Evaluating a Speaker’s Reasoning.” Retrieved April 18 th, 2006 from New%20Webpage/Persuasion2.ppt “Retro Junk: Your Memory Machine." Retrojunk. Retrieved April 18 th, 2006 from “Retro Junk: Your Memory Machine." Retrojunk. Retrieved April 18 th, 2006 from


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