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Crucify betray industry owl avenue festive astonished cheer blackmail hostage bus history stove hard intercourse brave trauma sinful bees drown stomach.

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Presentation on theme: "Crucify betray industry owl avenue festive astonished cheer blackmail hostage bus history stove hard intercourse brave trauma sinful bees drown stomach."— Presentation transcript:

1 crucify betray industry owl avenue festive astonished cheer blackmail hostage bus history stove hard intercourse brave trauma sinful bees drown stomach wine alert passion casino cockroach insult passage column aloof dollar Christmas sexy slaughter confused privacy yellow exercise couple admired shark surgery rejected skull errand umbrella happy life party enraged disgust cancer rape fork manner win promotion love pressure war anger elbow barrel progress desire car intimate accident fire killer salad slush curtains nude fireworks erotic evil pain controlling radiator kettle miracle treasure inspired weapon divorce panic bland violin joke valentine reunion assault surgery tumour alley sentiment aroused ecstasy glory mutilate hurricane thief elevator prairie rescue laughter flirt Emotion Word Processing: Evidence From Eye Movements Graham G. Scott, Patrick J. O’Donnell, & Sara C. Sereno University of Glasgow (marg) References & Acknowledgements Bradley, M.M., & Lang, P.J. (1999). Affective Norms for English Words (ANEW). The NIMH Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, University of Florida. British National Corpus (1995). Nakic, M., Smith, B.W., Busis, S., Vythilingam, M., & Blair, R.J.R. (2006). The impact of affect and frequency on lexical decision: The role of the amygdala and inferior frontal cortex. NeuroImage, 31, Scott, G.G., O’Donnell, P.J., Leuthold, H., & Sereno, S.C. (2006, August). Emotion word processing: Behavioural and electrophysiological evidence. Poster presented at the Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing (AMLaP) meeting, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Taylor, S.E. (1991). Asymmetrical effects of positive and negative events: The mobilization-minimization hypothesis. Psychological Bulletin, 110, Taylor, J.G., & Fragopanagos, N.F. (2005). The interaction of attention and emotion. Neural Networks, 18, This work was conducted as partial fulfilment of a PhD at the Univ of Glasgow for G.G. Scott, funded by an ESRC postgraduate fellowship. Corresponding author: Discussion Significant Frequency x Emotion interactions occurred in first fixation and gaze duration measures. Results seem to favour a perceptual defence based theory, such as Taylor’s (1991) Mobilisation- Minimisation hypothesis: - For LF words, high arousal words (positive & negative) are processed more easily than neutral words. - For HF positive words, high arousal levels facilitate processing without any cost incurred from their highly activated (i.e., HF) positive valence. - For HF negative words, initial processing facilitation is offset by the disruptive effects of highly activated (i.e., HF) negative valence. These data suggest that an early identification of the emotional tone of words leads to differential processing. Specifically, HF negative words seem to attract additional cognitive resources. This is consistent with a time-line in which emotional quality either accompanies or precedes (but does not follow) lexical access (Taylor & Fragopanogos, 2005). Results: Gaze Duration Main effect of Frequency (p<0.001). Main Effect of Emotion (p<0.01). Significant Interaction (p<0.001). For LF words: Negative < Positive < Neutral For HF words: Positive < Negative = Neutral Results: First Fixation Duration Main effect of Frequency (p<0.05). Main effect of Emotion (p<0.05). Significant Interaction (p<0.01). For LF words: Negative < Neutral Positive Negative For HF words: Positive < Negative = Neutral Materials & Design 2 x 3 within-subject design: Frequency (LF, HF) x Word Type (Pos, Neut, Neg). Word type was defined by arousal and valence ratings: Arousal Valence Frequency Length (lo-hi, 1-9) (neg-pos, 1-9) (#per mill) (characters) Example LF Pos valentine Neut appliance Neg suffocate HF Pos exercise Neut village Neg accident Note:Word frequency values: British National Corpus (BNC). Arousal and valence ratings: Affective Norms of English Words (ANEW) (Bradley & Lang, 1999) 15 words of each type (LF-Pos, LF-Neut, LF-Neg, HF-Pos, HF-Neut, HF-Neg) → total 90 words; matched for frequency, length, number of syllables, syntactic category. 30 sentence triples to accommodate target word triples. Each subject read each target in different sentence frames. 3 subject groups, so that each target was viewed in all 3 sentence frames. Sentence framekissnewsbomb 1Phoebe discussed the _____ at great length with her friends. 2Michelle dreamt about the _____ every night for weeks. 3Tom delivered the _____ with great care and attention. Introduction Only 2 studies have investigated the interaction of emotionality and word frequency. Nakic et al. (2006) carried out a lexical decision task (LDT) using a 2x3 design manipulating word frequency (high and low, HF & LF) and word emotionality (‘highly’ negative, ‘mildly’ negative, and neutral). They found main effects of frequency (HF


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