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EngageNY.org Research Lessons from Module 4: Elementary Session 3, May 2014 NTI.

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Presentation on theme: "EngageNY.org Research Lessons from Module 4: Elementary Session 3, May 2014 NTI."— Presentation transcript:

1 EngageNY.org Research Lessons from Module 4: Elementary Session 3, May 2014 NTI

2 EngageNY.org2 Learning Targets I can analyze 3-5 ELA Module 4s for the intentional backwards design process that scaffold students’ success. I can analyze appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities needing such support with the research process. I can analyze appropriate scaffolds for English Language Learners needing such support with the research process.

3 Written Conversation Find an elbow partner. In writing, silently respond to the first prompt on the Written Conversation Notecatcher for 2 minutes (pg. 64 in your notebook). Exchange notecatcher with partner and build upon/ react to her/his response for 2 minutes. Return notecatcher; reflect on what partner wrote for 1 minute. Repeat process. EngageNY.org3

4 Prompts 1.How do you currently scaffold module lessons to support students who are English Language Learners? OR How do you currently provide accommodations for students with disabilities? 2.What do you know about the differences between scaffolds, accommodations and modifications? EngageNY.org4

5 Introductions In split table groups, share your name, role, location and an item from your Written Conversation Notecatcher. EngageNY.org5

6 Mix and Mingle Select one quote from the envelope and read silently. Stand and seek out a participant from another table to (a) share your quote (b) share a reaction to the quote. Find a new partner and repeat this process for a total of 2 rounds. EngageNY.org6

7 Keep in Mind Classrooms in many of New York's schools are extremely diverse. Any given classroom may contain students with disabilities, English Language Learners, and students from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. It is important that students with learning challenges be treated as individuals with specific needs, rather than as a "group" with the same needs. EngageNY.org7

8 Keep in Mind Although many of the supports provided to students with learning challenges may appear to be the same, teachers should be carefully considering the differences between:  accommodations: specific supports provided to meet the individual needs of special education students)  modifications: changes made to the outcomes/content of curriculum made by way of IEP  scaffolds: temporary specific supports provided to meet the needs of individual English Language Learners (and other learners who may benefit). EngageNY.org8

9 We Believe Every student deserves is a "general education" student and that every student deserves the supports he/she needs to participate fully in his/her educational experience. EngageNY.org9

10 Blueprint for ELL Success Locate the “Blueprint for English Language Learner Success.” (pg. 67) Read the principles (in bold) that guide the blueprint (#1-8.) Text-Code  N=new information to me  A=affirms what I already know EngageNY.org10

11 Model Lesson- Part 1 Experience this lesson from a module through the eyes of a 4 th grade student. This module comes from 4 th grade, Module 4; Unit 3. Hold on to questions until the end of the model lesson at which time we will synthesize the learning from the lens of an educator. EngageNY.org11

12 PSA “Wear Your Helmet” Listen to audio file. Follow along with your PSA “Wear Your Helmet!” transcript (p. 66 in your notebook). EngageNY.org12

13 Learning Targets I can describe how a public service announcement is supported with reasons and evidence. I can find reasons and evidence for why voting is important in a text. EngageNY.org13

14 Final Performance Task Craft a PSA about the importance of voting. Your audience is young adults. Before you can craft your PSA, you need to learn more about the reasons why voting is important. EngageNY.org14

15 Research Partner up. One partner becomes “Partner A,” the other becomes “Partner B.” Partner A reads “Youth Power” and completes embedded questions and attached notecatcher Partner B reads “I Can’t Wait to Vote” and completes embedded questions and attached notecatcher. EngageNY.org15

16 Share Partners A and B should share reasons and evidence from their notecatchers. Partners should record new learning on their notecatchers. EngageNY.org16

17 Fist-to-Five I can describe how a public service announcement is supported with reasons and evidence. I can find reasons and evidence for why voting is important in a text. EngageNY.org17

18 Welcome Back to “Educator Hat” Please complete the first 3 rows on the Synthesis notecatcher (pg. 72 in your notebook). When finished, share your comments with your split table group. EngageNY.org18

19 Accommodations and Scaffolds What do you notice? EngageNY.org19

20 Break Enjoy a 15 minute rejuvenation EngageNY.org20

21 Model Lesson- Part 2 Find a partner from a different table, introduce yourself, turn back-to-back. Given what you know about opinions and PSAs, what criteria would you expect to see on a rubric for a public service announcement?” EngageNY.org21

22 PSA about the Importance of Voting Rubric Compare the criteria in this rubric to the criteria that you brainstormed during the Back- to-Back; Face-to-Face Protocol. EngageNY.org22

23 Learning Target I can write an introduction to my public service announcement that explains the importance of voting and states my opinion clearly. Think-Pair-Share: What is an opinion statement? Where does this target “live” in the PSA rubric? EngageNY.org23

24 Why Voting is Important Reread the “Reasons Why Voting is Important” column. Of the reasons, ask yourself: “Which of these reasons is most compelling to me to write about for my PSA?” Of the reasons, ask yourself: “Which of these reasons is most compelling to a high school senior for my PSA?” Highlight or star this reason. EngageNY.org24

25 Word Choice “There is no good reason for not wearing a helmet: You may wear your helmet when riding a bike, scooter, or skateboard.” “There is no good reason for not wearing a helmet: You can wear your helmet when riding a bike, scooter, or skateboard.” “There is no good reason for not wearing a helmet: You should wear your helmet when riding a bike, scooter, or skateboard.” “There is no good reason for not wearing a helmet: You must wear your helmet when riding a bike, scooter, or skateboard.” EngageNY.org25

26 Your Turn Craft an opening paragraph using the PSA Draft form. Remember:  Your tone must be strong.  Your opinion should be stated.  You should include at least two reasons. EngageNY.org26

27 Revision: Mix and Mingle Style Revise it for a clear purpose: Does the statement say what you want people to do and remember after hearing the PSA? Revise it for a clear opinion: Does the statement share your opinion on the importance of voting? Revise it for word choice: Does the statement have words that are strong and relatable?” EngageNY.org27

28 Self-Assessment Place a check mark in the appropriate column on your PSA Why Voting is Important rubric. EngageNY.org28

29 Welcome Back to “Educator Hat” Please complete the last two rows on your Synthesis notecatcher (pg. 73 in your notebook). Share your comments with an elbow partner. EngageNY.org29

30 Video Use the notecather on pg. 76 in your notebook.  5 th Grade Classroom  Bronx, NYC  Over 50% ELL students  Several students with disabilities  Research about characters in Esperanza Rising EngageNY.org30

31 Turn and Talk Students in this classroom were working on this Performance Task: You are a playwright commissioned to write a narrative script using passages from the novel Esperanza Rising and one of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights themes. How does this teacher support the research process and all students in her classroom? EngageNY.org31

32 Concentric Circles How were students set up for success in research and writing in this session? What are possible accommodations that were or could be made for students with disabilities when doing research and writing? What are possible scaffolds that were or could be made for ELL students when doing research and writing? EngageNY.org32

33 new things I learned about accommodations and/or scaffolds. 2 ways reading deeply supports students’ writing. 1 way to improve my practice. EngageNY.org33


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