Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

(Material) Changes to the Laws “Finn No Ball” Scope of Handled Ball - now only applies as striker plays it No runs off lawfully defending wicket Practice.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "(Material) Changes to the Laws “Finn No Ball” Scope of Handled Ball - now only applies as striker plays it No runs off lawfully defending wicket Practice."— Presentation transcript:

1 (Material) Changes to the Laws “Finn No Ball” Scope of Handled Ball - now only applies as striker plays it No runs off lawfully defending wicket Practice on field amended Can only take a third new ball after 80 (or whatever) full overs with the second(!) Minor change to stumped law as regards runners

2 “Finn No Ball” 24.6 Either umpire shall call and signal No ball if, other than in an attempt to run out the non-striker under Law 42.15, the bowler breaks the wicket at any time after the ball comes into play and before he completes the stride after the delivery stride.

3 Scope of handled ball reduced 33.1 The striker is out Handled the ball if, except in the circumstances of 2 below, in the act of playing a ball delivered by the bowler, he wilfully strikes the ball with a hand not holding the bat. Everything else is obstructing the field, Michael.

4 No runs from lawfully defending wicket Not even overthrows as previously. Treat as with disallowed leg byes: If it crosses the boundary or when they complete a run call dead ball. Can be run out before that. No ball applies if called, but no penalty runs if it hits helmet.

5 Practice on field Bowler may have warm up delivery to a team mate without run up as long as doesn’t delay the game or damage the ball, however…. A fielder may not practice bowling (ie with a run up) during the game or he may not bowl again for lesser of 30 mins’ play, one hour elapsed. Batsman may not practice on the field during play: First offence: warning. Further offences: 5 penalty runs etc etc.

6 Potential Mentoring Scheme 70 umpires thru L1 in 5 years, but few have made it to Panel CCB has ECB funds for player retention for agreed delivery plan 2013 survey highlighted quality of umpiring as crucial Would you be a mentor? You would be given one or more recently qualified L1 mentees Stand with them for two or more games which you would source (e.g. Evening League, Youth games) for which you would be paid a fee Help them through the game, encourage them Give them feedback, fill in form When they are ready, pass onto Appointments Officer for League appointments Additional modest “bounty” for any of your mentees who does 6 Panel games in a season

7 Q1) A batsman with a runner is on strike. The ball is a No ball. The striker moves out of his ground to play at the ball but he misses it. He tries to get back into his ground but is not able to do so before the wicket-keeper puts the wicket down. The runner is within his ground at square leg. There is an appeal. What is your decision and why? If he is out, state the method of dismissal. Test your understanding He is not out. The injured striker is now protected from what would have been a stumping if it was not a No ball. See Law 2.8(e)

8 Q2) Between deliveries in the middle of an over, you notice a fielder at fine leg bowling some practice balls to a coach who is standing beyond the boundary. They are not using the match ball for this. The fielder in question had bowled the preceding over. What should you do? Test your understanding This form of practice is illegal, as it involves a ball other than the match ball and also involves someone who is not a member of the fielding side. (Either one of these conditions is enough to breach Law 17.) The fielder must not be allowed to bowl until at least 30 minutes playing time has elapsed from the moment of the contravention, or until one hour has elapsed, whichever is the sooner. (See Law 17)

9 Q3) The striker hits the ball, which is not a No ball, in the air towards the boundary. A fielder near the boundary ‘catches’ the ball on the run within the field of play but his momentum is taking him towards the boundary. He throws the ball in the air before he steps over the boundary. A second fielder, who is nearby, steps outside the boundary and, from that position, leaps in the air to parry the ball (while he is airborne) back into the field of play, where it is caught by the first fielder, who has by now stepped back inside the boundary. Is the striker out or, if not, how many runs should be scored? Test your understanding Yes, the striker is out Caught. The first fielder’s first contact with the ball must be when he is grounded within the boundary or, if he is airborne, when he took off from within the boundary. However, any subsequent contact by any fielder can be made from any position, as long as the fielder is not in contact with the ball and the ground beyond the boundary at the same time. (See Laws 19 and 32)

10 Q4) The striker hits a ball, which is not a No ball, and it lobs in the air and it seems it might land on his own stumps. The wicket-keeper was standing next to the stumps but, before he could take what would have been a simple catch, the striker knocks the ball away with a hand not holding the bat. There is an appeal. Should the striker be out and, if so, how? Test your understanding The striker is out Obstructing the field. Although the circumstances of Law 33 (Handled the ball) are met, the fact that a catch was obstructed means that he should be out Obstructing the Field. (See Laws 33 & 37).

11 Q5) During a drinks interval, you notice one of the batsmen getting some coaching from his coach on the outfield. This involves the coach throwing him some balls to practice his forward defence shot. The batting side has not been warned previously about practising during the innings. What action should you take? Test your understanding This form of practice is not allowed – see Law You should warn the player that the practice is not permitted, and inform the other umpire, the captain of the fielding side and, as soon as practicable, the captain of the batting side of the reason for this action. This warning shall apply throughout the innings. The umpire shall so inform each incoming batsman. (Note, any subsequent breach by the batting side will incur a five run penalty.)

12 Q6) A batsman with a runner is on strike. The ball is not a No ball. The striker moves out of his ground to play at the ball but he misses it. He just manages to get back into his ground before the wicket-keeper puts the wicket down. However, when the wicket is put down, the striker’s runner is out of his ground at square leg. There is an appeal. What is your decision and why? If he is out, state the method of dismissal. Test your understanding The striker is out Run out. He cannot be out Stumped because of the position of his runner. (See Law 2.8(e))

13 Q7) The bowler delivers the ball from a position close to the return crease but it is not a No ball. You are sure that the bowler has not touched the stumps at any stage during the delivery. The batsman hits the ball in the air and is caught at mid off. As he is about to walk off, he notices a bail is on the ground at the bowler’s end wicket. He suggests to you that it should be a No ball. What is your decision? Test your understanding The striker is out Caught. You are sure that the bowler did not breach Law 24.6 and so the ball is not a No ball. No ball should only be called if you are sure that it was the bowler who broke the wicket. You may consult your colleague for verification if needed.

14 Q8) The batsmen are running and a run out might occur. The ball is powerfully thrown by a fielder towards the wicket keeper. One of the batsmen, who is running to make good his ground on a straight and wholly acceptable path, raises his hand and uses it to defend himself from the ball, which was likely to hit him on the head – he is not wearing a helmet. But for this interception, you are confident that a Run out was likely to occur. There is an appeal. What is your decision? Test your understanding The batsman is not out. If you are sure that the batsman’s act was one of self-defence, he is not out. (See Law 37.1). The fact that a run out might have occurred is irrelevant in this incident.

15 Test your understanding Q9) The striker hits the ball a second time in safeguarding his wicket and it goes towards square leg. The batsmen run. A fielder picks up and throws the ball, which hits the helmet of the fielder left on the ground behind the wicket-keeper. It hits the helmet before the batsmen have completed the first run. What should you as bowler’s end umpire do? You should call and signal Dead ball as soon as the ball hits the helmet. You should return the batsmen to their original ends, informing them that runs cannot be scored after a lawful second strike. You should repeat the Dead ball signal to the scorers and, if necessary, clarify that no Penalty runs are scored for the ball striking the helmet. (See Law 34)

16 Q10) The striker plays the ball and it drops in front of him. He immediately picks it up and throws the ball to a close fielder. No fielder has communicated with the batsman. How does the umpire answer an appeal? Test your understanding He is out Obstructing the field. (See Law 37)

17 Q11) A straight drive played along the ground by the striker is wilfully stopped by the non-striker with his hand not holding the bat (not in self-defence). There is an appeal. You are the bowler’s end umpire. What should you do? Would your decision be different if the handling prevented the bowler from taking a catch? Test your understanding In the first scenario, the non-striker is out Obstructing the field. Under the new Law, only the striker can be out Handled the ball and only during a limited period while he is receiving the ball. In the second scenario where a catch is obstructed, the striker would be out Obstructing the field, even though it was the non-striker who caused the obstruction. (See Laws 33 & 37)


Download ppt "(Material) Changes to the Laws “Finn No Ball” Scope of Handled Ball - now only applies as striker plays it No runs off lawfully defending wicket Practice."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google