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Helmet Policies and the Colorado 4-H Horse Program.

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Presentation on theme: "Helmet Policies and the Colorado 4-H Horse Program."— Presentation transcript:

1 Helmet Policies and the Colorado 4-H Horse Program

2 The 4-H Mission 4-H Youth Development Education creates supportive environments for culturally diverse youth and adults to reach their fullest potential. In support of this mission, we will: Provide formal and non-formal community-focused experiential learning. Provide formal and non-formal community-focused experiential learning. Develop skills that benefit youth throughout life. Develop skills that benefit youth throughout life. Foster leadership and volunteerism in youth and adults. Foster leadership and volunteerism in youth and adults. Build internal and external youth/adult partnerships for programming and funding. Build internal and external youth/adult partnerships for programming and funding. Strengthen families and communities. Strengthen families and communities. Use research-based knowledge and the land-grant university system. Use research-based knowledge and the land-grant university system. Achievement of this mission will result in capable, competent, and caring citizens.

3 The 4-H Value Set We believe that youth development is the focus of everything we do. We believe youth/adult partnerships are essential to successful youth development. We believe that volunteerism is fundamental. We believe in the strength attained from diversity across the entire range of 4-H experiences.

4 Colorado 4-H Development Handbook: Introduction and Philosophy; Targeting Life Skills “The goal of youth programming is to provide developmentally appropriate opportunities for young people to experience life skills, to practice them until they are learned, and be able to use them as necessary throughout a lifetime. Through the experiential learning process, youth internalize the knowledge and gain the ability to apply the skills appropriately.”

5 What are the helmet requirements in other 4-H programs?

6 Idaho, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Nebraska – some counties Alaska, Hawaii – complete rule; 9 states have statewide no rule 25 states have complete rules (all events, all the time)

7 Colorado – county decision Counties requiring helmets include: Counties requiring helmets include: –Fremont, Jackson, Larimer, San Miguel –El Paso, La Plata (gymkhana only)

8 Colorado State University Helmets are required at all times for all riders participating in CSU equine activities. Helmets are required at all times for all riders participating in CSU equine activities.

9 4-H Horse Project Manual Chapter 16 – Horse Safety Guidelines Chapter 16 – Horse Safety Guidelines “Wear protective headgear when riding. This should be strictly adhered to in any form of riding.”

10 “The rate of serious injury per number of riding hours is estimated to be higher for horseback riders than for motorcyclists and automobile racers” JL Firth, “Equestrian injuries”, in Sports injuries: mechanisms, prevention and treatment. (cited on CDC web page) How prevalent are horse related injuries?

11 National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) data tracks emergency room visits data: 1997 data: horse-related emergency room visits horse-related emergency room visits 9633 head injuries (1 out of every 6 visits) 9633 head injuries (1 out of every 6 visits) 2089 foot and toe injuries 2089 foot and toe injuries How prevalent are horse related head injuries?

12 Head injuries don’t “heal”. The damaged portions of the brain remain damaged. The damaged portions of the brain remain damaged. Other portions of the brain may compensate. Other portions of the brain may compensate.

13 Head injuries don’t “heal”. The damaged portions of the brain remain damaged. The damaged portions of the brain remain damaged. Other portions of the brain may compensate. Other portions of the brain may compensate. Other portions of the brain might not compensate. Other portions of the brain might not compensate.

14 Focusing specifically on equestrian injuries, in 1998 an estimated 64,608 individuals were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments for horse related injuries. Nineteen percent of those injuries were to the head or face. The rate of horseback riding injury sufficiently severe to require hospital-based emergency care was an estimated 28 per 100,000 riding hours, compared to the rate of 3.7 per 100,000 riding hours for bicycle-related injuries. Excerpts from “Injury in Colorado”, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, (p. 67)

15 From analysis of data from the Colorado Traumatic Brain Injury Surveillance, 179 Coloradans were hospitalized in 2001 and 2002 with a traumatic brain injury sustained while riding a horse. An estimated 14 percent were known to be wearing a helmet at the time of the injury. Approximately two-thirds of the horse riders (65 percent) were female. Half of the riders were age 42 or older, however, 16 percent were ages On average, five bicyclists are killed and 166 are hospitalized each year for a traumatic brain injury sustained in a bicycle crash.

16 Recommended strategy for prevention: Recommended strategy for prevention: Injuries due to horse riding Work with county extension agencies, 4-H, and other equestrian groups to promote equestrian helmet use. Excerpts from “Injury in Colorado”, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, (p. 72)

17 Equestrian Helmets: Why Not?

18 Helmets are ugly

19 They won’t seem so ugly once we get used to them. They won’t seem so ugly once we get used to them. Is fashion more important than safety? Is fashion more important than safety?

20

21 Ski helmets reduce head injury Helmets reduced head injury among skiers by 60% (6,000 skiers involved in study) Helmets reduced head injury among skiers by 60% (6,000 skiers involved in study) (Norwegian study published in Feb. 22, 2006 Journal of American Medical Association)

22 Eddy Mercxk

23 Bicycle helmets reduce head injury Bicycle helmets reduce the risk of serious head injury by as much as 85% and the risk of brain injury by as much as 88%. (Injury Fact Book, Center for Disease Control) (Injury Fact Book, Center for Disease Control)

24 Bicycle helmets reduce head injury Bicycle helmets reduce the risk of serious head injury by as much as 85% and the risk of brain injury by as much as 88%. (Injury Fact Book, Center for Disease Control) (Injury Fact Book, Center for Disease Control)

25

26 Delores Toole – 2004 NFR Deb Mohon – 11 time NFR qualifier

27 Helmets cost too much! Troxel helmets available through National Safe Kids Campaign. Troxel helmets available through National Safe Kids Campaign. –$25 each if purchased individually. –$20 each if purchased in bulk (10 or more). Other helmets are available at local tack shops. Other helmets are available at local tack shops.

28 “I don’t like mandatory rules!”

29 Current mandatory requirements include: Boots (to protect feet) Boots (to protect feet)

30 “I don’t like mandatory rules!” Current mandatory requirements include: Boots (to protect feet) Boots (to protect feet) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms)

31 “I don’t like mandatory rules!” Current mandatory requirements include: Boots (to protect feet) Boots (to protect feet) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long pants (to protect legs) Long pants (to protect legs)

32 “I don’t like mandatory rules!” Current mandatory requirements include: Boots (to protect feet) Boots (to protect feet) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long pants (to protect legs) Long pants (to protect legs) Belt Belt

33 “I don’t like mandatory rules!” Current mandatory requirements include: Boots (to protect feet) Boots (to protect feet) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long pants (to protect legs) Long pants (to protect legs) Belt Belt Coat (English riders) Coat (English riders)

34 “I don’t like mandatory rules!” Current mandatory requirements include: Boots (to protect feet) Boots (to protect feet) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long-sleeved shirt (to protect arms) Long pants (to protect legs) Long pants (to protect legs) Belt Belt Coat (English riders) Coat (English riders) “A conservative-colored hunt or dressage coat, light-colored breeches…” “A conservative-colored hunt or dressage coat, light-colored breeches…”

35 “A helmet requirement will hurt enrollment.”

36 Do we value numbers over safety??? Do we value numbers over safety??? “A helmet requirement will hurt enrollment.”

37 Do we value numbers over safety??? Do we value numbers over safety??? 15 states with mandatory helmet policies responded to Brenda Brown’s survey 15 states with mandatory helmet policies responded to Brenda Brown’s survey 10 states saw little or no effect on enrollment 10 states saw little or no effect on enrollment 3 states reported temporary effect 3 states reported temporary effect 1 state said impact varied depending on staff attitudes in counties 1 state said impact varied depending on staff attitudes in counties 1 state policy was too new to know effect 1 state policy was too new to know effect “A helmet requirement will hurt enrollment.”

38 Larimer County’s experience: No helmet program Program announced, video required Helmets required Helmets required No helmet program

39 Helmets are not traditional

40 Let’s make safety a tradition Let’s make safety a tradition

41 Education or Policy? Studies on bicycle helmet use indicate education alone is less effective than a combination of education and helmet requirements. Studies on bicycle helmet use indicate education alone is less effective than a combination of education and helmet requirements. Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 1997

42 Education or Policy? Studies on bicycle helmet use indicate education alone is less effective than a combination of education and helmet requirements. Studies on bicycle helmet use indicate education alone is less effective than a combination of education and helmet requirements. BOTH education and helmet requirements for youths are needed. BOTH education and helmet requirements for youths are needed. Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 1997

43 Helmet use varies widely across the U.S., with higher use in states with helmet laws. Additionally, children living in households with adults who reported always using bicycle helmets were 3.6 times more likely to also always use bicycle helmets as compared to children living with adults who did not always use bicycle helmets. Excerpts from “Injury in Colorado”, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, (p. 65)

44 Why a statewide policy?

45 More efficient – deal with the issue once More efficient – deal with the issue once

46 Why a statewide policy? More efficient – deal with the issue once More efficient – deal with the issue once Takes pressure off county staff – reduces conflict Takes pressure off county staff – reduces conflict

47 Why a statewide policy? More efficient – deal with the issue once More efficient – deal with the issue once Takes pressure off county staff – reduces conflict Takes pressure off county staff – reduces conflict Easier to implement Easier to implement –State Fair showmanship “mishap” –Larimer County leader advised members they didn’t need to wear helmets at State Fair “because (the Extension Agent) won’t be there”

48 Why a statewide policy? More efficient – deal with the issue once More efficient – deal with the issue once Takes pressure off county staff – reduces conflict Takes pressure off county staff – reduces conflict Easier to implement Easier to implement –State Fair showmanship “mishap” –Larimer County leader advised members they didn’t need to wear helmets at State Fair “because (the Extension Agent) won’t be there” ALL our members deserve good safety policies ALL our members deserve good safety policies

49 Why a statewide policy? We believe that youth development is the focus of everything we do. We believe that youth development is the focus of everything we do. We develop skills that benefit youth throughout life. We develop skills that benefit youth throughout life. We use research-based knowledge and the land-grant university system. We use research-based knowledge and the land-grant university system.

50 Healthy heads…they’re half of the program Thank you


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