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LEGACIES OF LIFE: Creating Proactive Norms through Healthy Transitions to College.

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Presentation on theme: "LEGACIES OF LIFE: Creating Proactive Norms through Healthy Transitions to College."— Presentation transcript:

1 LEGACIES OF LIFE: Creating Proactive Norms through Healthy Transitions to College

2 Presented By: David S. Anderson, Ph.D. Associate Professor Jennifer Maltby Program Coordinator GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Graduate School of Education Department of Health, Fitness and Recreation Resources Center for the Advancement of Public Health

3 In Loving Memory Of: Sally G. Coleman July 5, 1941 – October 21, 1999 We are all treasures, enduring survivors, bright, beautiful, and full of goodness……..We are more than we imagine. We are connected through our love and tears to one another. We are all equal, and worthy of love, freedom and fellowship. We are beautiful at this moment, exactly as we are today. From Sally’s book Seasons of the Spirit

4 ... alcohol contributes to damage and crime on college campuses. We know...

5 Alcohol's Involvement With Campus Problems College Alcohol Survey: 2000

6 We know... Alcohol's Involvement In Personal Behaviors College Alcohol Survey: 2000

7 ... alcohol use negatively impacts academic performance. We know...

8 Average Number Of Drinks Per Week By Grade Point Average National Core Survey: 1996 We know...

9 Alcohol's Involvement In Academic Issues College Alcohol Survey: 2000

10 ... students overestimate the level of alcohol and other drug use by their peers. We know...

11 Actual and Perceived Annual Alcohol Use: Virginia Colleges/Universities We know... Virginia Core Survey: 2000

12 We know comprehensive and planful approaches are stressed and widely used.

13 Task Force Planner Groups Campus Leadership Coordinator Health and Counseling Student Life Police and Security Faculty Residence Life Student Government Student Groups Community We Know….

14 Policies & Implementation Curriculum Awareness & Information Support & Intervention Enforcement Assessment & Evaluation Training Staffing & Resources Components Task Force Planner We Know….

15 We Know….

16 We know heavier alcohol use is relatively resistant to change.

17 College Student Drinking Patterns We know... Monitoring the Future

18 Campus Effort and Heavier Use Patterns We know... Monitoring the Future Level of Effort

19 We know a national conference was held in 1995 to identify new strategies to better address drug and alcohol abuse.

20 We know... The Challenge 2000 conference, convened at the University of Notre Dame, engaged 200 professionals in an intensive process. Vision groups of 8-10 members identified meaningful approaches for healthier campuses. Emerging from this conference were seven life health principles.

21 OPTIMISM VALUES SELF-CARE RELATIONSHIPS COMMUNITY NATURE SERVICE We know…

22 “For every problem, there is one solution which is simple, neat and wrong.” Henry Louis Mencken

23 Healthy Expectations The overall purpose of Healthy Expectations is to alter the campus environment through extensive attention to first year students prior to and during their first year in college.

24 Healthy Expectations Healthy Expectations focuses on the quality of the campus environment through a wide range of strategies and philosophies.

25 Healthy Expectations This innovative initiative is organized around six frameworks or constructs:

26 Healthy Expectations Audience Means Modes Focus Sponsorship Theoretical Foundations

27 Audience Students during their first year at GMU GMU first year students, prior to their matriculation to campus Local high school seniors

28 Means

29 Modes Technology   Website  OptionFinder Traditional

30 Focus Fall Freshmen Survey Parent Survey at Orientation Spring Campus Survey

31 Sponsorship Student Affairs Academic Life

32 Theoretical Foundation I Correct Misperceptions of Peer Alcohol and Other Drug Use

33 Theoretical Foundation I

34 Theoretical Foundation II Address the Underlying Needs of Students

35 We believe that human beings are basically good and that, despite setbacks, our history is on a path of progress and promise.

36 We believe that values are at the core of self and community and are essential to any meaningful change. OPTIMISM

37 We believe that an ethic of balanced self-care is fundamental to flourishing as a human being in the world community. OPTIMISM VALUES

38 We believe that learning how to be in working relationships is an essential developmental task for young adults. OPTIMISM SELF-CARE VALUES

39 We believe that creating a culture of community through rituals, symbols, traditions, and heroes is needed to insure quality educational experiences. OPTIMISM VALUES SELF-CARE RELATIONSHIPS

40 We believe that the connection of the biological, natural being to the larger planetary system is essential and insures the health of the planet and our well-being, including our ultimate spiritual survival. OPTIMISM VALUES SELF-CARE RELATIONSHIPS COMMUNITY

41 OPTIMISM VALUES SELF-CARE RELATIONSHIPS COMMUNITY NATURE We believe that service is indispensable in engaging people in authentic and meaningful learning experiences and in creating positive social change.

42 OPTIMISM VALUES SELF-CARE RELATIONSHIPS COMMUNITY NATURE SERVICE Theoretical Foundation II

43 Existing Campus-based Approaches Residence Life Orientation University 100 Data collection

44 Residence Life RA Training and Fair Discussion Series Bulletin Boards Honors Banquet

45 The Issue or ConcernOur ResponseResident Advisor’s Role A range of problems or areas of concern result from alcohol abuse. These can detract from the quality of life faced by students, and include violent behavior, vandalism, detractions from academics, and other consequences. The strategies undertaken by the Healthy Expectations project are designed to complement existing services, programs, policies and related efforts. These build upon and often go in different directions from typical efforts. You have a vital role to play in the lives of new students, as well as their parents. Each of your residents will seek your guidance and opinions regarding life at George Mason University. This is particularly true of first year students who are trying to learn to fit in at George Mason. New students will watch your behaviors, sense your attitudes, and listen carefully to your words Students typically overestimate the level of drug and alcohol use by their peers; they think “everyone is doing it.” This tends to result in higher use patterns to keep up with the “imaginary peer.” We incorporate social norms marketing strategies to educate the campus community about the Reality of students’ alcohol use. Posters, bulletin boards, media campaigns, and messages help provide accurate and current facts. Information comes from GMU data collection, updated annually, as well as from state and national sources. Be accurate with alcohol messages Emphasize that “NOT everyone is doing it” Correct misinformation as you hear it Promote the wide range of activities available at GMU and in the surrounding community When in doubt, say so and then try to obtain the information Most traditional drug/alcohol prevention programs nationally deal with the symptoms and behavioral consequences associated with substance use. Our approach addresses factors that underlie substance abuse, which, if addressed, will reduce the demand for alcohol and other drugs. These seven life health themes, emerging from a national conference, offer positive ways to have vibrant health and a more meaningful life. Be positive and upbeat about life at GMU Promote the various cultural, social, recreational, academic, personal support, and other activities and services available Talk about the quality experiences and good relationships you have had here Describe ways in which you have maintained a healthy balance of life during your first year and later

46 OPTIMISM Identify at least 5 people that you consider to be role models. These may be people you know (friends or family) or people you don’t know (celebrities, politicians). What characteristics of each person’s attitude do you want to include in your life? Be specific. Please rate each person’s optimism on a 5-point scale (5 being very optimistic). PersonCharacteristicsOptimism Rating Sample Discussion Series Handout

47 Honors Banquet istening nergy rowth ction ompassion es! Some of the most important decisions in life are made by default because people do not realize their options. Instead of directing life they often passively allow life to happen to them by not planning and acting. They may not learn to consider alternatives and to look ahead to see where their current behavior may lead them. Later in life, they may find themselves shipwrecked or becalmed in stagnant waters and look back with regret, “If only I had known…” Hindsight is often very clear, but it is always an afterthought. Take time now to engage in this important planning and visioning. Think about how to live a healthy and fulfilling life, how to recognize options, make confident decisions, and overcome obstacles. From Charting Your Course: A Lifelong Guide to Health and Compassion Sally Coleman and David Anderson University of Notre Dame Press, Center for the Advancement of Public Health Department of Health, Fitness & Recreation Resources Graduate School of Education

48 Orientation Orientation Leader Training Parent Orientation

49 The Issue or ConcernOur ResponseOrientation Leader' Role A range of problems or areas of concern result from alcohol abuse. These can detract from the quality of life faced by students, and include violent behavior, vandalism, detractions from academics, and other consequences. The strategies undertaken by the Healthy Expectations project are designed to complement existing services, programs, policies and related efforts. These build upon and often go in different directions from typical efforts. You have a vital role to play in the lives of new students, as well as their parents. Each of your residents will seek your guidance and opinions regarding life at George Mason University. This is particularly true of first year students who are trying to learn to fit in at George Mason. New students will watch your behaviors, sense your attitudes, and listen carefully to your words Students typically overestimate the level of drug and alcohol use by their peers; they think “everyone is doing it.” This tends to result in higher use patterns to keep up with the “imaginary peer.” We incorporate social norms marketing strategies to educate the campus community about the Reality of students’ alcohol use. Posters, bulletin boards, media campaigns, and messages help provide accurate and current facts. Information comes from GMU data collection, updated annually, as well as from state and national sources. Be accurate with alcohol messages Emphasize that “NOT everyone is doing it” Correct misinformation as you hear it Promote the wide range of activities available at GMU and in the surrounding community When in doubt, say so and then try to obtain the information Most traditional drug/alcohol prevention programs nationally deal with the symptoms and behavioral consequences associated with substance use. Our approach addresses factors that underlie substance abuse, which, if addressed, will reduce the demand for alcohol and other drugs. These seven life health themes, emerging from a national conference, offer positive ways to have vibrant health and a more meaningful life. Be positive and upbeat about life at GMU Promote the various cultural, social, recreational, academic, personal support, and other activities and services available Talk about the quality experiences and good relationships you have had here Describe ways in which you have maintained a healthy balance of life during your first year and later

50 Students typically overestimate the level of drug and alcohol use by their peers; they think “everyone is doing it.” This tends to result in higher use patterns to keep up with the “imaginary peer.” The Issue or Concern

51 We incorporate social norms marketing strategies to educate the campus community about the reality of students’ alcohol use. Posters, bulletin boards, media campaigns, and messages help provide accurate and current facts. Information comes from GMU data collection, updated annually, as well as from state and national sources. Our Response

52 Be accurate with alcohol messages Emphasize that “NOT everyone is doing it” Correct misinformation as you hear it Promote the wide range of activities available at GMU and in the surrounding community When in doubt, say so and then try to obtain the information Orientation Leader’s Role

53 Helping Your Student Make A Healthy College Transition As you prepare for your student to attend George Mason University, we know that YOU are probably going through some transitions and adjustments yourself. With that in mind, we share the following suggestions to help make your student’s adjustment smooth and healthy. 1. Listen: Allow your student to share his/her feelings and expectations about all of the new experiences college will bring. Encourage your student to share both concerns and excitement openly with you by reserving judgment and simply allowing him or her to talk. 2. Inquire: Your student may be hesitant to share with you pre-college fears or certain experiences during the first year at college. It is important to ask your student about those subjects that may be uncomfortable to discuss. You may easily ask about academics, but don’t be afraid to ask about other aspects of college life. Inquire about the relationships your student is developing at college, including friends, roommates and romantic relationships. Ask your student about activities on the weekend and the choices she or he is making about alcohol and other drugs. Your student may not share everything with you, but it will help to know that you are willing to discuss these and other topics if the need arises. 3. Support: Although they may not always say it, first year students need parental support. Let your student know that you have confidence in their abilities. Knowing that you believe he or she will be both academically and socially successful in college will greatly enhance your student’s self-confidence. E- mail, cards, phone calls and care packages are great ways to stay connected.

54 University 100 Freshman year experience class Presentations

55 Data Collection Freshmen only survey Parent Survey Campus wide, electronic survey

56

57

58 New Initiatives s High Schools Peer Theater GMU TV Quizzes

59 s Getting addresses Format of Responses to Change in frequency

60 High Schools Access and overload concerns Parent/Student nights Assembly

61 Peer Theater Originated in the high schools Theater Department Health Educator Script includes the following themes: Drunk Driving Sexual Assault Not everyone drinks Peer pressure Drug use Transition issues Advice from upper-class students

62 GMU-TV Interviews with a diverse group of students about their transition Use in high schools Challenges in adhering to timelines Common questions: What did you expect when you came to college? How did you manage your transition to college? What advice would you give to incoming students? Describe alcohol and other drug use in your high school. How do you perceive alcohol use on campus?

63 On-line Quizzes

64

65 HEALTHY EXPECTATIONS GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Healthy Expectations 4400 University Dr., MS 1F5 Fairfax, VA Phone:

66 End Presentation


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