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Vaccine Schedule, Safety, and Communicating with Media Meg Fisher, MD Medical Director, The Children’s Hospital Monmouth Medical Center An affiliate of.

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Presentation on theme: "Vaccine Schedule, Safety, and Communicating with Media Meg Fisher, MD Medical Director, The Children’s Hospital Monmouth Medical Center An affiliate of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Vaccine Schedule, Safety, and Communicating with Media Meg Fisher, MD Medical Director, The Children’s Hospital Monmouth Medical Center An affiliate of the Saint Barnabas Health Care System Long Branch, NJ

2 Disclosures I am a Phillies fan!!!! I have no other disclosures. I may be mentioning off label uses of vaccines.

3 Objectives Following this, you will be able to: Discuss vaccine safety Explain the vaccine schedule Remember the preventable infections Communicate with the media

4 Immunization Safety Starts during development Animal studies before human studies Safety and efficacy Investigational New Drug Application Phase 1, 2 and 3 clinical trials

5 Post-licensure Safety Vaccine adverse events reporting system Vaccine Safety datalink Clinical immunization safety assessment Manufacturer, Phase 4 studies University, interested investigators

6 Vaccine Schedule Why so soon?: Early infection often more dangerous Delaying doesn’t decrease adverse events Delaying leaves children unprotected

7 Vaccine Schedule Why so many?: Prevention is better than trying to cure More in this case is better The immune system is designed to handle multiple antigens at once

8 Ben Franklin “In 1736 I lost one of my sons, a fine boy of four years old, by the smallpox taken in the common way. I long regretted bitterly and still regret that I had not given it to him by inoculation. This I mention for the sake of the parents who omit that operation, on the supposition that they should never forgive themselves if a child died under it; my example showing that the regret may be the same either way, and that, therefore, the safer should be chosen.”

9 Is Natural Disease Better ? No way! Very risky approach An ounce of prevention makes more sense Not true for many of the diseases Not an approach that protects children

10 Preservatives, Additives, Adjuvants and Residuals Thimerosal, phenol, 2-phenoxyethanol Sugars, amino acids, proteins (gelatin, albumen, cow derived stuff) Aluminum salts enhance immune response Antibiotics, formaldehyde, cellular products (egg, yeast)

11 Why Mandate Vaccines? Prior to mandates, rates were low and disparities abounded Look at adult rates for influenza and pneumococcal vaccines Why mandate education: children = our future Why immunizations: Ounce of prevention will always be superior to pounds of cure

12 Use of Resources Millions spent to disprove any association of measles vaccines and autism Millions spent to disprove damage from thimerosal These have been costly distractions Let’s spend the effort studying autism

13 Websites

14 Vaccine Preventable Diseases Hepatitis B, rotavirus, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis A, Neisseria meningitidis, human papillomavirus

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31 Smiling is a contagious condition!

32 Communication Dictionary.com definition: imparting or interchange of thoughts, opinions, or information by speech, writing, or signs Keys to effective communication: credibility and trust

33 Media Communication Establish credibility and trust Building credibility: credentials, consistency, knowledge, resources Building trust: empathy, competence, honesty, commitment, and accountability Be available

34 Media Musts Know the media: print, radio, television, web Be aware of deadlines and meet them Print: you write the article Print: you are interviewed Whenever possible, review in advance

35 Media Interviews When a request is received, answer promptly Clarify the request and deadline Schedule the interview Research the topic Prepare, rehearse, prepare, rehearse

36 Your Message Limit it to 3 points Don’t try to teach them everything you know Be sure the 3 points are covered Whatever you say can be quoted Nothing is ever really off the record

37 Know The Audience The reporter is not the audience Especially important at live events Talks for the general pubic differ from presentations at Grand Rounds Avoid jargon, use English

38 Interview Tips Sound bites sell media Be sure your sound bites are on message Prepare and rehearse Use the questions to get to your message Don’t argue and don’t lose your cool

39 Radio Interviews Limit your message to 3 points Be prepared and rehearse Speak with passion Stay positive Vary your voice

40 Television or Other Visual Be prepared and rehearsed Arrive early Wear make up; only simple jewelry Avoid stripes and checks; pastels work Sit up straight, sit forward

41 Live vs. Taped Live shows require even more preparation Plan your time well Know your message inside and out Know the other guests Beware of “balanced” programs

42 Taped Shows Ability to edit may help or hinder Your 30 min interview may be cut to 30 sec Sound bites sell media Stay on message Be passionate if possible

43 Why Do This? We need spokespeople You are passionate about children You have the information You teach every day

44 The End


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