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Injury and Violence Prevention Branch Applications and Programs Unit Stephania Sidberry, MPH Applications and Programs Unit Healthy Carolinians Conference.

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Presentation on theme: "Injury and Violence Prevention Branch Applications and Programs Unit Stephania Sidberry, MPH Applications and Programs Unit Healthy Carolinians Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 Injury and Violence Prevention Branch Applications and Programs Unit Stephania Sidberry, MPH Applications and Programs Unit Healthy Carolinians Conference October 8 th, 2009

2 Applications and Programs Unit Applications and programs unit has four programs:  Rape Prevention and Education Program (RPE)  Enhancing and Making Programs and Outcomes Work to End Rape (EMPOWER)  Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Prevention Program  Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

3 Rape Prevention and Education Program (RPE)

4 National data indicate that as many as 1 in 6 women and 1 in 33 men experience rape or attempted rape at least once in their lifetimes, while many more experience some other form of sexual violence such as harassment, peeping, threats, and other behaviors. RPE Program

5  According to an analysis of the NC Behavioral Risk Factor Survey data, about 10 percent of North Carolina women report experiencing sexual violence after the age of 18. About 38% were assaulted by partners or spouses, 15% by acquaintances, and 16% by strangers.  The number experiencing sexual violence is likely much higher, since the stigma associated with sexual violence continues and leads to significant under-reporting. RPE Program

6 According to the NC Council for Women and Domestic Violence Commission, the 75 rape crisis centers across North Carolina served 6,527 victims of sexual assault, and received 22,671 crisis calls between April 2007 and March RPE Program

7 Joint effort of:  Department of Health and Human Services  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention RPE Program

8 Program Goals  To reduce the incidence of rape and sexual assault in the state.  Done by providing a broad array of primary prevention focused educational services that reach specific professional groups and the public including children, adolescents, and adults. RPE Program

9  Funding since the mid 90’s.  Have funded 68 local rape crisis centers through 2006 – some stand-alone, some combined domestic violence/rape crisis centers.  Also funded the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault (NC CASA).  Since 2006, funding is competitive with programs annually. RPE Program

10 Program Design  Majority of RPE funds contracted out to local agencies through a competitive RFA process.  RFA released every two years, next date will be April  Eligible agencies include private, non-profit organizations, public or local governmental agencies, and local health departments, whose mission and history clearly demonstrate a commitment to prevent sexual violence. RPE Program

11 Program Design  This fiscal year funding 14 Agencies and the NC Coalition Against Sexual Assault (NC CASA).  Funding 13 Agencies and NC CASA for the FY 2010 contract year beginning November 1 st. RPE Program

12 FY 09 Agency FY 10 Agency FY 09/10 Agency 2 Agencies in FY 09 1 Agency in FY 10 1Agency in FY 09 2 Agencies in FY 10 LEGEND: RPE Program Counties 09-10

13  Agencies receive grant funds to promote the use of a public health approach in the efforts of eliminating sexual violence.  Focuses on the primary prevention of sexual assault.  This approach is population-based (rather than focusing on an individual), uses evidence-based practices to the greatest extent possible, and conducts evaluation to ensure effective programming. RPE Program

14 Enhancing and Making Programs and Outcomes Work to End Rape (EMPOWER)

15 Joint effort of many partners including:  Department of Health and Human Services  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault  North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence (DELTA) Enhancing and Making Programs and Outcomes Work to End Rape (EMPOWER)

16  North Carolina was one of six states selected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2005 to implement the first stage of EMPOWER.  To date the NC team has made significant progress towards developing a state plan to prevent sexual violence by working through the Getting to Outcomes for Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence (GTO) process.

17 Program Goals  EMPOWER uses a process call Getting to Outcomes, or GTO to prevent intimate partner and sexual violence.  GTO is a 10-step public health approach to plan, implement, evaluate and disseminate strategies to prevent IPV and SV.  The state plan includes objectives for the RPE program and broader state prevention system capacity (data, policy, leadership, sustainability, etc.) Enhancing and Making Programs and Outcomes Work to End Rape (EMPOWER)

18 EMPOWER next steps:  Working through the GTO process with a team of state and local partners.  Phase II of EMPOWER: May 2009 – April  Team currently being reconfigured for Phase II, which focuses on implementation and evaluation of the state plan. Enhancing and Making Programs and Outcomes Work to End Rape (EMPOWER)

19 #1 Needs/ Resources #2 Goals #3 Best Practices #4 Fit #5 Capacities #6 Plan #7 Implementation #8 Outcome Evaluation #9 Improve #10 Sustain Enhancing and Making Programs and Outcomes Work to End Rape (EMPOWER)

20 Contact Information Ingrid Bou-Saada, RPE and EMPOWER Program Manager Division of Public Health Injury and Violence Prevention Branch 1915 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC

21 Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Prevention Grant

22  Suicide is the third leading cause of death among those aged Motor vehicle accidents (31%) Motor vehicle accidents (31%) Homicides (15%) Homicides (15%) Suicides (11%) Suicides (11%)  More than 4,000 adolescents and young adults die by suicide each year.  From , North Carolina lost almost 1,100 young people, years old to suicide. Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

23 2007 High School YRBS 2007 High School YRBS 12.5% considered suicide in the past 12 months 9.5% planned suicide in the past 12 months 13.3% attempted suicide in the past 12 months Age Group year olds year olds year olds Suicides*2881 Hospitalizations ED Visits Suicides and Suicidal Behavior in NC 2006 Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

24 Joint effort of:  Department of Health and Human Services  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  UNC Injury Prevention Research Center  Appalachian State University School Health Training Center Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

25 Program Goals  Promote awareness of suicide as a public health problem;  Implement evidence-based programs focused on early identification and referral;  Improve access to appropriate mental health or support services for at-risk youth; and  Improve the collection and reporting of data to support program efforts. Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

26 Program Design  Trainings in ASIST and SafeTalk offered to 100 School- Based Child and Family Support Teams, 23 School- Based/School Linked Health Centers and school xx and support staff.  Comprehensive Media Campaign  Community College initiative Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

27 Program Design  ASIST prepares caregivers to provide suicide first aid interventions (ex: administrative and teaching staff).  SafeTalk identifies persons with thoughts of suicide and connects them to suicide first aid resources. It is designed to be used in organizations and communities where there are already ASIST-trained caregivers. (ex: school support staff). Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

28 Program Design  Child and Support Family Teams (CFSTs) work in local schools to help students succeed in the classroom and have stable lives with permanent families.  A full time school nurse and social worker team are based in selected schools.  A full time school nurse and social worker team are based in selected schools.  They get the parents’ consent to serve the student, work with families to figure out what the real needs are, and partner with them and others to get services.  They get the parents’ consent to serve the student, work with families to figure out what the real needs are, and partner with them and others to get services. Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant

29 School based/linked Health Centers CFST Teams CFST Teams and School based/linked health Center Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant Counties

30 Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant Program Design  Communications Campaign –Will involve a website, other promotional materials and marketing campaign –Conducted 9 focus groups to get youth perspective on campaign –Website live by January 2010

31 Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Grant How you can get involved?  Trainings not just for CFSTs and health center staff.  Anyone who works with youth ages can be trained.  Training requirement: complete referral/tracking form.

32 Contact Information Jane Ann Miller, Youth Suicide Prevention Program Manager Division of Public Health Injury and Violence Prevention Branch 1915 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC

33 Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

34  Deaths from fires and burns are the fifth most common cause of unintentional injury deaths in the United States (CDC 2005) and the third leading cause of fatal home injury (Runyan 2004).  The United State’s mortality rate from fires ranks sixth among the 25 developed countries for which statistics are available (International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics 2003). Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

35 Joint effort of:  Department of Health and Human Services  UNC Injury Prevention Research Center  North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center  Office of State Fire Marshal  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

36 Program Goals:  Increase the number of homes with functional smoke alarms.  Increase the number of homes with adequate smoke alarm coverage. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

37 Program Goals  Increase residents’ knowledge about general fire safety: -Smoke Alarm maintenance -Keeping an eye on smokers -Safe cooking practices -Safe use of space heaters Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

38  Get Alarmed, North Carolina! funded since  Program in second of five-year funding cycle.  Second five-year cycle ends September  Total smoke alarms installed in North Carolina through September 2009 – 14,719. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

39 Henderson Cherokee Clay Graham Cedar Mountain Volunteer Fire Dept. – Transylvania CountyCedar Mountain Volunteer Fire Dept. – Transylvania County Town of Tryon DBA Tryon Fire Department – Polk CountyTown of Tryon DBA Tryon Fire Department – Polk County Lovelady Volunteer Fire Department – Burke CountyLovelady Volunteer Fire Department – Burke County Davidson County Fire Marshal's OfficeDavidson County Fire Marshal's Office Burlington Fire Department - Alamance CountyBurlington Fire Department - Alamance County Williamston Fire / Rescue Department – Martin CountyWilliamston Fire / Rescue Department – Martin County Camden Fire Marshal's Office, Elizabeth City - Pasquotank CountyCamden Fire Marshal's Office, Elizabeth City - Pasquotank County Perquimans County Fire Marshal's OfficePerquimans County Fire Marshal's Office Get Alarmed, North Carolina! Counties Previous Get Alarmed Grantees FY 2010 Get Alarmed Grantees

40  Program targets high risk residents and structures including: –Low-income families –Families with young children –Older Adults –Persons with disabilities –Old Structures –Mobile Homes –Rental Homes –Persons with cultural and/or ethnic differences Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

41 Fire agency protocol:  Inspect existing smoke alarms (About 40% of homes enrolled in the project already had a smoke alarm in the home, but it was not working).  Replace all old smoke alarms that are not lithium powered with new alarms that are lithium powered outside the bedrooms in the approximate center of every sleeping area.  Install new alarms with long life lithium batteries. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

42 Fire agency protocol:  Alarms on all levels of home - EACH level must have at least 1 alarm powered by lithium batteries (MOST homes will not need more than 3 smoke alarms).  National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) requires an alarm in each bedroom in NEW Construction.  NFPA also recommends to have another alarm somewhere else in the home. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

43  Installation Do’s and Don’ts: –Do not install in areas where temperature or humidity are outside manufacturer’s limits (not below 40ºF or above 100ºF). –Do not install where mounting surface could become too cold or too hot. –Do not install within 3 feet of a bathroom or kitchen door. –Do not install within 3 feet of a supply air register and not in direct flow path. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

44  Installation Do’s and Don’ts –Do not install within 3 feet of the tips of ceiling fan blades. –Do not install where the smoke would be blocked from reaching the smoke alarm for stairways leading to other occupied levels, –Do locate the smoke alarm on the basement ceiling at the top of the stairs. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

45  Installation Do’s and Don’ts: –Do test your smoke alarm at least monthly – more often if recommended by the manufacturer. –Do save the smoke alarm instructions and follow the testing and maintenance recommendations. Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

46 Request for Applications (RFAs) Get Alarmed, North Carolina!

47 Get Alarmed, North Carolina!  A RFA is released annually to 3,000 Fire Agencies.  Encourage your local fire agency to apply.  Agencies need assistance with spreading the word, identifying and referring residents in high risk homes/areas.  Released in January and available on our website: –http://www.injuryfreenc.ncdhhs.gov/  If you wish notified when the RFA is released, leave me your contact information.

48 Get Alarmed, North Carolina! Eligible recipients of awards are: 1. Fire Departments or official representatives of Fire Agencies such as Fire Marshal’s Offices or Fire Fighter’s Associations who serve counties with a population of 50,000 or fewer persons; OR, 2. Fire districts with a district population of 50,000 or fewer persons, regardless of county population; OR,

49 Get Alarmed, North Carolina! 3. High-risk neighborhoods with a population of 50,000 or fewer persons, regardless of county population. This includes Fire Agencies in larger cities.

50 Sherri Troop, Get Alarmed North Carolina! Program Manager Division of Public Health Injury and Violence Prevention Branch 1915 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC Contact Information

51 Stephania Sidberry, MPH Division of Public Health Injury and Violence Prevention Branch 1915 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC Contact Information


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