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Who’s Responsible for the Sexual Climate? An Institution-wide Approach Scott C. Brown, Ph.D., Associate Vice President/Dean of Students Dawn LaFrance,

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Presentation on theme: "Who’s Responsible for the Sexual Climate? An Institution-wide Approach Scott C. Brown, Ph.D., Associate Vice President/Dean of Students Dawn LaFrance,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Who’s Responsible for the Sexual Climate? An Institution-wide Approach Scott C. Brown, Ph.D., Associate Vice President/Dean of Students Dawn LaFrance, Psy.D., Associate Director, Counseling Center Thad Mantaro, MS., Director, Shaw Wellness Institute Colgate University ACPA 2014: Indianapolis, IN 1

2 Context The social and sexual climate is a central issue for college students. Students desire to navigate their sexuality in a safe and constructive environment. Students report sexual assaults and harassment. Institutions are expected to be proactive. How can we create a climate of sexual respect? 2

3 Learning Objectives Increased knowledge of an all-campus approach to improve sexual climate. List 3-5 programs and initiatives that support a positive sexuality model. Identify at least 3 initiatives to consider on your campus. “Wise people learn from their mistakes…” 3

4 Agenda Legal and Political Landscape Sexual Climate Advisory Committee (SCAC) “Plan Do Study Act” Approach Positive Sexuality Initiatives Translating Strategies to other Campuses Questions/Closing/Evaluation 4

5 Legal and Political Landscape Know Your IX University of Montana “Blueprint” Campus SAVE Act Dear Colleague Letter

6 Legal and Political Landscape Obama White House Action (2014) 6 end-sexual-assault Video goes here

7 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee (SCAC) Setting the Stage Colgate University – Size, Location, Campus Culture Your Stakeholders – Interest & Motivation Consider Current Data Points Set Realistic Goals 7

8 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee (SCAC) Charge “Faculty, staff and students are charged with developing, coordinating, and evaluating initiatives that improve the sexual climate.” “All that rises must converge.” 8

9 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee S.M.A.R.T. Goal “Using a PDSA approach, improve the sexual climate as evidenced by reduction in students taken advantage of sexually, experienced attempted/successful penetration, and sexual harassment; and increase in percentage of students who can define consent and perceive themselves empowered to make own sexual choices.” 9

10 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee 10

11 11

12 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Inclusive, comprehensive, dynamic and nimble Faculty, students, staff (representative) Approach/Sub-Committees o Individual (Health/Education) o Environment (Programming/Events) o System (Policy) 12

13 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Monthly Agenda Template Update on PDSAs in progress/data review (attendance/demos, pre-post, focus groups, quick polls, etc.) Proposed new area-related initiatives/PDSAs Suggestions for monthly surveys Possible topics for full SCAC discussion

14 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Individual Yes Means Yes YMY Video goes here

15 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Individual Womentoring program (discontinued) Train Deans-on-Call to interface with all stakeholders on victim’s behalf Random Conversations About Sex (RUCAS) 15

16 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Environment Lectures Laci Green “Best Sex Ever” Naomi Wolf Jackson Katz Queerfest 16 Performances “This is Not a Play about Sex” Vagina Monologues “Wires” and FUSE Dance

17 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Environment Communication Pos. Sexuality Website Pos. Sexuality Calendar Educational Campaigns 17 Trainings Peer Health Educators Workshop Series (e.g., Greek, Student Government)

18 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Environment Feminist Council of Elders Positive Sexuality House Bystander Intervention Focus Groups (e.g., Taxonomy of Sexual Situations, Non- Majority Population) 18 Groups Summit Sexual Climate Summit

19 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee System Training First responders (RAs, Campus Safety, Deans) Equity Grievance Panel (EGP)/appellate officers Teaching sexual violence issues 19 Policy and Procedures First-year orientation Student of concern forms Brown bags/brochures Audit EGP Process & Sexual Climate

20 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee System Communication Nine for IX Assessing Incapacity SCAC Awareness Consent 20

21 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee System - Communication 21

22 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Results We saw in increase of 41.7% in the number of students who could correctly identify consent after the campaign.

23 Sexual Climate Advisory Committee Results (continued) # of EventsParticipants Total Programming: EGP Policy/Training:7963 Total:

24 Translation to Other Campuses Make the case: Legal, educational, aspirational Stakeholder: Who cares and/or can get things done? Communicate, Coordinate, Cultivate Three things you might do? Comments? 24

25 Thank You! Contact Scott Brown: Dawn LaFrance: Thad Mantaro:

26 References Baxter Magolda, M., & King, P. (2004). Learning Partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship. Sterling VA: Stylus. Bogle, K. A. (2008). Hooking up: Sex, dating, and relationships on campus. New York University Press: New York. Breitenbecher, K. H. (2000). Sexual assault on college campuses: Is an ounce of prevention enough? Applied and Preventive Psychology, 9, DeFur, K. M. (2012). Don't Forget the Good Stuff! Incorporating Positive Messages of Sexual Pleasure into Sexuality. American Journal of Sexuality Education, 7(2), DeKeseredy, W. S., & Kelly, K. (1993). The incidence and prevalence of woman abuse in Canadian university and college dating relationships. Canadian Journal of Sociology, 18,

27 References Foubert, J. D., & Newberry, J. T. (2006). Effects of two versions of an empathy-based rape prevention program on fraternity men's survivor empathy, attitudes, and behavioral intent to commit rape or sexual assault. Journal of College Student Development, 47, Friedman, J. and Valenti, J. (2008). Yes Means Yes! Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape. Seal Press: Berkeley, CA. Katz, J. (1994). Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) trainer’s guide. Northeastern University’s Center for the Study of Sport in Society. Boston, MA. LaFrance, D. F., Loe, M., & Brown, S. C. (2012). “Yes Means Yes”: A new approach to sexual assault prevention. American Journal of Sexuality Education, 7, Oswalt, S.B. (2010). Beyond risk: Examining college students' sexual decision-making. American Journal of Sexuality Education, 5(3), Owen, J. J., Rhoades, G. K., Stanley, S. M., & Fincham, F. D. (2008). “Hooking up” among college students: Demographic and psychological correlates. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 39,


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