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Continuing the Community Action Plan

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1 Continuing the Community Action Plan
Preventing and Reducing the Trafficking of Women and Girls through Community Planning in York Region Continuing the Community Action Plan Developed by: Nicole Pietsch, Gender-Based Specialist Presented By: Sunaina Mannan, Anti-Human Trafficking Coordinator, Women’s Support Network of York Region

2 Vision To increase community safety by addressing the needs of women and girls at risk of sexual exploitation and human trafficking in York Region, Ontario. (2013 – Current) Develop inter-agency protocols, guidelines and best practices to ensure appropriate responses of service providers to intra- regional trafficking of girls sand women To increase community safety Addressing the needs of women and girls at risk of sexual exploitation and human trafficking Develop inter-agency protocols, guidelines and best practices to ensure appropriate responses of service providers to intra-regional trafficking of girls sand women

3 Project: Engagement of a Local Coalition (YRAHTC)
Local Safety Audit & Needs Assessment Community Action Plan Engagement of a Local Coalition (YRAHTC) Local Safety Audit & Needs Assessment Community Action Plan

4 Local Safety Audit on HT: York Region
What did the community tell us? LSA: What did the community tell us?

5 Engagement of a Local Coalition (YRAHTC)
Consulted Stakeholders by Sector *Graph of different Stakeholders: Sectors consulted included: Criminal justice partners such as police and community safety officers. Criminal justice partners bring necessary expertise about the law, legal processes, court preparation and support, crime prevention and security mechanisms, and procedures for reporting incidences of violence against women Women’s organizations, such as women’s Centre, shelter and sexual assault centre staffs. Women’s grassroots organizations and organizations offering frontline service to abused women bring expertise about women’s experiences of violence, supportive services, innovative service structures, and systems meant to support survivors of violence Social Services, such as health, income support and counselling services. Social services bring expertise about the presenting needs of women and girls in the community. Local social service agencies and programs also often have an established and positive relationship with women and girls. Many of these services provide outreach and educational services, through which local women and girls find information, connect with community-based professionals and connect with other women and girls Child protective services. These services bring expertise about young women’s experiences of violence, supportive services and systems meant to support survivors of violence. They also bring expertise about barriers that young women are facing in local communities Educational institutions. Stakeholders at educational students have established relationships with students and youth populations. Specialized services or groups. Stakeholders from these groups bring important expertise about the needs of a particular population. Examples include: Youth Immigrant and refugee women and girls Lesbian, gay, trans and queer-identified women Aboriginal women and girls Hard to reach populations, or those experiencing particular hardship, such as: homeless, transient or street-involved women and girls women and girls engaged in sex work; women and girls with mental health issues women and girls engaged in substance use or with addictions women and girls in conflict with the law other socially marginalized populations of women and girls These specialized services or groups bring expertise and awareness about specific barriers, adversity or contexts in the lives of a specific population. Those working in these organizations often also bring information about alternative or innovative models of service provision (i.e. drop-in, informal intake, street outreach); as well as knowledge about anti-oppression work, equity work, and GBA+ framework for supporting service-users. Faith-based community groups or members. These stakeholders bring additional resources, social supports and sense of community. Faith-based groups have much to offer to a coordinated response – examples across the province of Ontario include grassroots safe housing, financial support to victims, emergency practical support, settlement support, and working with women in grassroots and innovative ways Elected officials. Elected officials such as members of parliament and city or town councils have expertise about local demographics, issues facing local constituents and regional support services and infrastructures available. Elected officials sit in leadership positions in a community, can have the capacity to prioritize or bring greater awareness to a local issue or problem.

6 Local Safety Audit Stage 1: Wide & Shallow Analysis
Nine municipalities Rural, suburban and urban areas Population 1,032,524, 43% reported to be immigrants to Canada 204 identified ethnic groups 60+ languages Home to Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation Community: 275 Ojibwa/Anishinaabeg people Stage 1: Wide and Shallow Analysis Residents experience disproportionately higher levels of precarious and temporary employment in comparison to other GTA regions New immigrants are at higher risk of being in the precarious employment cluster Barriers faced by fast=growing populations earning low and moderate incomes: Prohibitive cost of land and housing (i.e.: southern regions like Markham, Richmond Hill and Vaughan) Therefore increases in homelessness, risk of homelessness and increasing social isolation lack of literature regarding Indigenous populations Socio-economic trends: Poverty Rapid population growth Lack of social infrastructure Significant increase in youth population Prohibitive housing Land costs Social isoloation

7 Local Safety Audit Stage 2: Narrow & Deep Analysis Results
Key informants (women with lived experience of human trafficking) self-identified with: A history of transience (2 or more moves over the last three years): 3 of 4 key informants A history of childhood sexual abuse or suspected childhood sexual abuse: 4 of 4 key informants A history of substance use: 3 of 4 key informants Key informants (women with lived experience of human trafficking) self-identified with: A history of transience (2 or more moves over the last three years): 3 of 4 key informants A history of childhood sexual abuse or suspected childhood sexual abuse: 4 of 4 key informants A history of substance use: 3 of 4 key informants

8 Needs Assessment participants Tell us?
Needs Assessment on HT: York Region What did Needs Assessment participants Tell us? Needs Assessment on HT: York Region What did Needs Assessment participants Tell us?

9 Recommendations Address and challenge sexist expectations of girls and girls’ sexuality (in the media, in schools) Teach about sexual exploitation in sexual education classes “Teach girls not to see themselves as objects. See yourself as a good person” (KI, November 21, 2013: 2) Address and challenge sexist expectations of girls and girls’ sexuality (in the media, in schools) Teach about sexual exploitation in sexual education classes Practical assistance (food, shelter, income) when a young person is in a crisis Practical assistance (food, shelter, income) when a young person is in a crisis “[I got kicked out and] this guy told me if I slept with him he would let me stay with him” (FG Participant, October 15, 2013: 29)

10 Recommendations, cont. Targeted outreach
Women want to feel welcomed and accepted by the community “That card, I still have the card, I kept it….And then when I worked at Howard Johnson or whatever and I found they had human trafficking [information] there, pamphlets or whatever in the office, and it made me think about it too” (KI, December 18, 2013: 18) Targeted outreach Women want to feel welcomed and accepted by the community

11 Pair “practical”/economic supports with psycho-social supports
Recommendations, cont. Pair “practical”/economic supports with psycho-social supports (i.e. programs, services or activities that build a community for exploited women) Inter-agency protocols, guidelines and best practices that intentionally consider psycho-social needs As example: ensure appropriate responses by service providers to trafficked girls and women Pair “practical”/economic supports with psycho-social supports Inter-agency protocols, guidelines and best practices that intentionally consider psycho-social needs Training for professionals on creating a welcoming space for sex workers and sexually-exploited women Training for professionals on creating a welcoming space for sex workers and sexually-exploited women (include challenging socio-cultural expectations of women)

12 Emergency shelter and practical assistance;
Recommendations, cont. Programs, services and activities that address economic/practical factors for sexually-trafficked women. As example: Emergency shelter and practical assistance; Targeted outreach on how to access emergency shelter and practical assistance; Transitional/subsidized housing: make sure trafficked women can meet criteria/apply for these programs Programs, services and activities that address economic/practical factors for sexually-trafficked women.

13 Next Steps? Creative/targeted outreach Coordination of Services
Public Education Identify available resources Create a map of services available in YR Research and/or develop educational material Locating hard to reach populations/ Distribution of material Investigate other regions and models Determine who target population(s) is/are WG I Identify available resources Locating hard to reach populations/ Distribution of material Development of outreach initiatives WG II Create a map of services available in YR Investigate other regions and models Create a consistent referral process WG III Research and/or develop educational material Determine who target population(s) is/are Presenting information to target populations Development of outreach initiatives Create a consistent referral process Presenting information to target populations

14 Questions? Comments?

15 Work Cited The Learning Network. Human Trafficking (Issue 2, September 2012). Ontario Women’s Directorate. Changing Attitudes, Changing Lives: Ontario’s Sexual Violence Action Plan


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