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From Incidents to Incidence: Measuring Sexual Violence Amidst War and Displacement GHI Seminar Violence Against Women Lindsay Stark, DrPH October, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "From Incidents to Incidence: Measuring Sexual Violence Amidst War and Displacement GHI Seminar Violence Against Women Lindsay Stark, DrPH October, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 From Incidents to Incidence: Measuring Sexual Violence Amidst War and Displacement GHI Seminar Violence Against Women Lindsay Stark, DrPH October, 2012

2 Methodological Lessons Learned from the Literature on Measuring Sexual Violence Information collected has traditionally depended on self- disclosure. Disclosure biggest problem in measuring sexual violence (more so than definitional issues, fabrication, etc.). These issues have led to widely varying estimates of rape and sexual violence  Any data collection effort that purports to measure rape and sexual violence must include methods to overcome the compelling forces that favor nondisclosure

3 Key Measurement Decisions -face-to-face administration -extensive pre-testing -careful interviewer selection and training -matching interviewers and respondents -ensuring privacy and confidentiality -recall and telescoping -constructing questions to engender trust -formulating behaviorally- and relationship-specific questions -requiring interviewers to probe -long interview schedule -making rape the exclusive focus of the study

4 Neighborhood Method Case Studies

5 The Neighborhood Method Draws on the lessons learned in other settings Incorporates a novel element of secondary reporting Is based on the principle that an informant can validly and reliably report on the experiences of others in close proximity – her ‘neighborhood’ Allows collection of info on many from one interview.

6 Methodological Features of Four Case Studies

7 Four-Country Findings  Women and children in humanitarian settings are facing alarming levels of violence.  In the three settings in Africa, more than one out of every two females is indicated to have experienced violence during the recall period.

8 Findings (cont.)  In all settings, a woman was much more likely to be raped or beaten in her own home by someone she knew than she was to be raped by a stranger. Sri Lanka

9 Findings (Cont.)  Only a small percentage of cases are currently being reported to formal mechanisms such as the police and hospitals. Physical Violence, Ethiopia

10 Implications  Relying on formal records results in a skewed understanding of GBV events which affects programming and policy

11 From a 2011 Liberia Assessment of GBV: “Analysis of the GBV database reveals that between September 2009 and September 2010, there was an average of 174 GBV cases reported per month…Of the cases captured in the database, rape was the largest concern, accounting for over 60% of GBV cases seen; domestic violence was second, making up 20% of reported cases.”

12 Implications (cont.)  Effects of GBV may have long-term consequences on children -Children who witness domestic violence are 4-5 times more likely to have poor outcomes in adulthood than are children who have not been exposed to such violence. -These children are also more likely to repeat such patterns in their own adult lives, either by becoming abusers or victims.

13 Implications (cont.)  GBV against girls is reported more often than GVB against adult women - In Liberia, 34.7 percent of rape committed against girls was reported to the police/court, while only 4.4 percent of rape committed against adult females was reported to police (p <.001)

14 Implications (cont.)  Findings on the vulnerability of displaced populations is inconclusive Sri Lanka -Camp-dwelling females had RR of 1.8 for experiencing physical violence compared to those in flight from Somalia to Ethiopia. -Camp-dwelling females had a RR of 1.3 for experiencing rape in the camp setting as compared to those in flight from Somalia to Ethiopia.. Ethiopia

15 Thank You

16 Evaluation of the Neighborhood Method: Reliability Reliability -Patterns of reporting -ICC (3,1) -Matched secondary reports  Good relative reliability (ICCs for respondents and neighbors from.86 to.97).  Self-report rates slightly higher compared to neighbors, but slightly lower when reporting on children in own HH compared with neighbors HH  Fairly high kappas (about 0.5).

17 Evaluation of the Neighborhood Method: Validity Validity -Statistical comparison (T-tests) of primary (IV) and secondary (DV) reporting -Comparison of primary and secondary reports of Sri Lankan girls  Neighborhood Method relatively robust when compared with a traditional survey that relies on self-report alone (most T-tests NOT significant at the alpha <.05 level).

18 Evaluation of the Neighborhood Method (cont.) Cost-effectiveness -Approximately $30,000 per study vs. $100,000 CDC study in Swaziland -Requires a smaller team/less time than a traditional household study  More cost-effective than a traditional household survey Ethics -Negative repercussions in Ethiopia -No negative repercussions in Sri Lanka or Uganda  Need to develop ways to measure unintended consequences


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