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FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY The Rape-Nui Case - Case Study - The Burke/Lonvig Model Remember this drawing?

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Presentation on theme: "FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY The Rape-Nui Case - Case Study - The Burke/Lonvig Model Remember this drawing?"— Presentation transcript:

1 FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY The Rape-Nui Case - Case Study - The Burke/Lonvig Model Remember this drawing?

2 Jung's approach to psychology has been influential in the field of depth psychology and in counter cultural movements across the globe. He emphasized understanding the psyche through exploring the worlds of dreams, art, mythology, world religion and philosophy. - For example the Rapa-Nui culture – its art (Moais), mythology, religion and philosophy The Rape-Nui Case

3 Claudio A. Batista Diaz of Chile is a native from Easter Island who visited “Lille Fejringhus”. He told generously about Rapa-Nui culture, legends and mythology. The Rape-Nui Case

4 Easter Island History I Easter Island is a Polynesian island in the south eastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian triangle. The island is a special territory of Chile. Easter Island is famous for its monumental statues, called Moai, created by the Rapa-Nui people. It is a world heritage site with much of the island protected within the Rapa Nui National Park. Easter Island is known by the locals as Rapa Nui and it has just one town, Hanga Roa where virtually every one of the 2,700 inhabitants lives. The island is roughly triangular in shape with an extinct volcano on each corner.

5 The Rape-Nui Case Easter Island History - II The collection of 25 meter-high stone sculptures (Moais) still puzzles historians and archaeologists as to its origins. It is believed that a society of Polynesian origin settled here in the 4th century and established a unique tradition of monumental sculpture. Between the 10th and 16th centuries, they erected the enormous stone figures, known as the Moai, which have long fascinated the entire world and endowed this island with a mythical atmosphere.

6 The Rape-Nui Case Claudio A. Batista Diaz told generously about the Rapa-Nui culture, legends and mythology – from him I had the inspiration to do a series of 8 Rapa-Nui motifs: Easter Island is the Navel of the World The mysterious Moais The Birdman legend The Rongorongo glyphs The fire as a tool and as a symbol The Rapa-Nui petroglyphs - art carved in rocks

7 “ Navel of the World” Inspired by the Rapa-Nui legend about the round world as a belly and Easter Island as the navel in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean – The Navel of The World The Rape-Nui Case

8 Discovered on Easter Sunday, 1722 by Dutch explorer Jakob Roggeveen, this collection of 25 meter- high stone sculptures still puzzles historians and archaeologists as to its origins. It is believed that a society of Polynesian origin settled here in the 4th century and established a unique tradition of monumental sculpture. Between the 10th and 16th centuries, they erected the enormous stone figures, known as the Moai, which have long fascinated the entire world and endowed this island with a mythical atmosphere. “Moai” The Rape-Nui Case

9 Moai are monolithic human figures carved from rock on the Polynesian island of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) between 1250 and 1500 CE. Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called Ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-fifths the size of their bodies. The moai are chiefly the 'living faces' (aringa ora) of deified ancestors. The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but most would be cast down during later conflicts between clans. The statues' production and transportation is considered a remarkable intellectual, creative, and physical feat. The tallest moai erected, called Paro, was almost 10 meters (33 ft) high and weighed 75 tones; the heaviest erected was a shorter but squatter moai at Ahu Tongariki, weighing 86 tons; and one unfinished sculpture, if completed, would have been approximately 21 meters (69 ft) tall with a weight of about 270 tons. “Three Moais” The Rape-Nui Case

10 The Tangata manu (bird-man), was the winner of a traditional competition on Rapa Nui (Easter Island). The ritual was an annual competition to collect the first Sooty Tern (manu tara) egg of the season from the islet of Motu Nui, swim back to Rapa Nui and climb the sea cliff of Rano Kau to the cliff top village of Orongo. Contestants were revealed in dreams by ivi- attuas (individuals with the gift of prophecy). The contestants would each appoint a Hopu who would swim to Motu Nui and fetch them the Egg; whilst the contestants waited at Orongo. The race was very dangerous and many Hopu were killed by sharks, drowning or by falling. Once the hopu had presented the egg to the contestant a fire would be lit on the landward side of the rim of Rano Kau; the location of the fire would announce to the whole island whether the new Tangata manu were from the western or eastern clans. The winner was given a new name and the title Tangata manu, and great power on the island, including his clan's having sole rights to collect that season's harvest of wild bird eggs and fledglings from Motu Nui. “Bird-Man” The Rape-Nui Case

11 The Tangata manu would then lead a dance down the slope of Rano Kau and on either to Anakena if he was from the western clans or Rano Raraku if he was from the eastern clans. Make-make was the chief god of the birdman cult, the other three Gods associated with it being Hawa-tuu-take- take (the Chief of the eggs) his wife Vie Hoa and Vie Kanatea. The Birdman cult was suppressed by Christian missionaries in the 1860s. The origin of the cult and the time thereof are uncertain, as it is unknown whether The Rape-Nui Case

12 Rongorongo is a system of glyphs discovered in the 19th century on Easter Island that appears to be writing or proto-writing. It has not been deciphered despite numerous attempts. Although some calendrical and what might prove to be genealogical information has been identified, not even these glyphs can actually be read. If rongorongo does prove to be writing, it could be one of only three or four known independent inventions of writing in human history. “Rongorongo glyph no. 44" The Rape-Nui Case

13 Inspired by one of the most important things to the Rapa-Nui people - the fire used in day to day life as well as in Rapa-Nui. rituals, legends and mythology “Fire” The Rape-Nui Case

14 Inspired by Rapa-Nui petroglyphs - art carved in rocks - especially by a motif of a deeply carved shark with a smaller shark inside located on a flat lava flow inland at Anakena Beach, where the Easter Island's first settlers, Hotu Matu'a and his family, are believed to have landed “Shark Tails – petroglyph” The Rape-Nui Case

15 The End The Rape-Nui Case FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY COPYRIGHTS STEPHEN JOSEPH BURKE AND ASBJORN LONVIG


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