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Unit 1: Historical and Literary Context Week One Overview

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 1: Historical and Literary Context Week One Overview"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Unit 1: Historical and Literary Context Week One Overview
5 days, 1 hour each day 10 minutes: Grammar/Writing/Vocabulary warm up 1-2 minutes: Introduction, Objectives, Expectations minutes: Mini Lesson and practice 20 minutes: Read 5-10 minutes: Wrap up with Writing Reflection

3 Day One: “The House on Mango Street” – “Gil's Furniture Bought & Sold”
The chapter titles are sequential. During the second week, students will read the book while listening to it being read. The website for the reading is :http://esl-bits.net/ESL.English.Learning.Audiobooks/Mango_Street/index.html We will listen for approximately 20 minutes each day. On the final day, we may listen longer to finish the book. The titles are the vignettes that will be read each day. Similes and Metaphors

4 Record the rule in your grammar journal.
The warm-up is designed to give students a task that they start immediately. This helps with classroom management and avoids the wasted time for the students as I take role. It is also much easier to call the class to meeting when they are quietly working on a task than talking to each other. The warm-up is displayed on the overhead when students enter the room. The “grammar journal” is actually a section in their composition notebook. There is a section for writing wrap-ups and another section for literature notes and activities. Everything they do in class is recorded in their journals which I check in class during the activity. They have ten minutes to complete the warm-up before the slide is changed. Each slide is timed to change at the time allotted. This keeps everyone on track so that all material can be covered for that day. This doesn’t necessarily mean I can’t stop the slides to spend more time where needed. More material is planned for each day than the average student can complete, but I have the option of skipping a part or assigning it as homework. After I finish taking role, I circulate around the room and check in with every student to answer questions or help where needed. I also can check work and make sure they are recording the information asked for. If I notice a student mistake, I might ask, “Why did you write ____? Is that a proper noun or a common noun? Why did you think that was a proper noun?” By asking this series of questions, I can find where the misunderstanding was and correct it on the spot rather than wait and check and correct later. Since students are paired up (two students sit at a table together), I can easily reach more than one student at a time. Students are encouraged to help each other quietly, so I know if one student has made a mistake, it is likely that they both have made the same mistake. During this ten minutes, I have done a quick formative assessment, differentiated instruction, and made a personal connection with each student. Record the rule in your grammar journal. Using your novel, find and record as many abstract nouns as you can before the timer signals the end of this warm up. Be ready to share out and discuss.

5 Create our own similes and metaphors and explain what they mean.
Identify examples of figurative language in the novel. Read from “The House on Mango Street,” record examples of similes and metaphors from the text, and explain their meanings Listen to a lesson on Similes and Metaphors Take notes to refer to later for the task The entire school uses CHAMPS which stands for Conversation level, Help (how to get it), Activity, Movement, Participation, and Success. Each box tells that part of the acronym from top to bottom. Students also get an overview of what will happen in class as well as the expectations for behavior and performance.

6 Research Paper Find ten new and interesting facts about Sandra Cisneros that you didn’t use in your last paper. Due this Friday. Use at least one cited resource. See MLA citation handout. Be prepared to share. The research project is presented on Monday and assigned as homework. During the third week, students will use their facts to write a one-page paper that they will present to their small group while I walk around and listen. Each group will choose one of the presenters to present to the whole class. I have built in enough of these projects so that everyone will eventually present to the class at least once.

7 Picture is linked to a video which can be accessed by clicking on the picture. I try to include a short video in every lesson to add variety and novelty to the structure of the lesson. The videos are usually 3-5 minutes long and followed by discussion. Since most students are familiar with similes and metaphors by 9th grade, this lesson is a review. We only spend 10 minutes or less on the presentation and the slide stays up while students complete the task that goes with the lesson.

8 Mini Lesson: Similes and Metaphors
Similes and Metaphors make comparisons The comparisons made are not always obvious, which can sometimes make them difficult to fully understand. During this unit you will be expected to identify and explain figurative language (similes and metaphors) in THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET both individually and in groups. You will also create your own examples.  Questions? This discussion slide is part of the mini-lesson.

9 Quick Write: Create a simile or metaphor about yourself
Quick Write: Create a simile or metaphor about yourself. Then, identify it as a simile or metaphor. Finally, explain its meaning. Your paper should look like this: (Write your simile or metaphor here) 2. This is an example of a ________________.  3. My simile/metaphor means ____________ _________________________________________. During this part of the lesson, I circulate as described in the warm-up. This is my main way of teaching due the vast disparity of ability levels of my class population. Spot checking as each student completes their task means I can immediately assess and correct or give feedback. It also saves time with grading.

10 Classwork We will read along and listen to THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET together.  After reading you will identify and explain at least three examples of figurative language, so keep an eye out for those while we read. By this point in the lesson, I would look at the time remaining and subtract 5-10 minutes to allow for wrap up. Whatever time remains is how long we will listen and read along. Since I have allowed two weeks to finish the book, minutes a day should be plenty of time. The site we listen from gives a time of 2 hours and 8 minutes of listening time.

11 Homework: (must be 100% done)
Write two metaphors and two similes that describe your family members and/or friends.  Explain each example's meaning. One simile should use "like" (My girlfriend's eyes are like emeralds), and one should use "as" (My roommate is as lazy as a panda bear).  Then write two metaphors. BE SURE TO EXPLAIN ALL FOUR EXAMPLES. Unfortunately, only about 10% of my students will do any homework (a problem across the campus which is due mostly to student’s home life as many work or take care of younger siblings and have other responsibilities after school. I do not penalize students who don’t turn in homework, but to get an A in my class usually requires most students to do homework. Homework completed and turned in on time gets 10% of the grade added to their lowest grade. For example, if a students makes a 100, I add ten points to their lowest grade. There is always a test or quiz (usually grammar or a department test that seldom covers anything we do in class) that ends up needing the extra points. If we run out of time, work labelled “classwork” becomes a homework assignment with the same reward.

12 Writing Wrap up: In your journal, reflect on the opening four vignettes in THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET. What kind of girl do you think Esperanza is? Would you want to be her friend? Why or why not? I always include some type of reflection during the last 5 minutes of class. I think it helps students to reflect on what they learned and put it in writing. Many students will still be writing when the bell rings because they are reminded that their reflections are part of their grade. I grade these holistically at the end of the 6 weeks based on what percentage of the reflections were completed. I count the reflections and divide by the highest number for each class. I read a few from each student, but I don’t grade the content. At the end of a grading period, I could have as many as 3000 reflections to grade (if by some miracle all 110 of my students did every one of them). Even if it was only 2000 (a more likely number), I wouldn’t have time to grade them all so carefully.

13 Day Two: “Louie, His Cousin…” – “The Family of Little Feet”
Point of View

14 Record the rule in your grammar journal.
This is part 2 of the lesson from yesterday. Record the rule in your grammar journal. Look back at the list of abstract nouns and create a chart like the one above. Beside each abstract noun, write the person from the novel associated with it. Be ready to share out and discuss.

15 Read from “The House on Mango Street” and complete some quick writes.
Work with your partner in order to understand point of view better. Listen to a lesson about point of view Take notes to refer to later for the task

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17 Discussion: What point of view is “The Three Little Pigs” told from? What evidence do you have to prove this? Hint: pay attention to the pronouns. Discuss with your partner and write down your evidence. Be prepared to share. What perspective is this story told from? How about this story? Compare the different points of view and discuss with your partner. Record a summary of your discussion. This lesson includes two videos that total almost 10 minutes. The length of the lesson will probably mean less time reading, but since the reading is only loosely related to the content, it doesn’t matter if we get the full 20 minutes. When I use this lesson in the classroom, I will make adjustments that reflect what can truly be accomplished in the hour.

18 Classwork While we read today, notice Esperanza's narration style in the 1st person POV.  Try to identify examples of subjective narration that force us, the readers, to infer deeper meaning. I will probably stop and discuss the first example or two to show students what they are looking for and how to find it. I often do “think alouds” to model the processes needed to complete the task.

19 After Reading With a partner, review "Cathy Queen of Cats" and identify an example of Esperanza possibly not fully understanding something. Write the example and then explain the full meaning.  Now, review "Louie, His Cousin..." again. Discuss with your partner the deeper meaning of what is really happening here. During this part of class, I will be circulating and listening in. I find student have much more opportunities to practice speaking and listening in small groups than during class discussion. If I notice an error being repeated among groups, I stop and clarify or reteach a point with the whole group, then return to small group instruction. I also find that students are more comfortable and share more in this environment.

20 Wrap up: Write a paragraph from the 3rd person omniscient POV that fully explains what is happening. (For example, "Esperanza at first is not sure that Louie's cousin stole the Cadillac..." This will probably turn into homework, but I will make sure they have the last five minutes of class to start it.

21 Day Three: “A Rice Sandwich” – “Papa Who Wakes…”
Symbols

22 Write the sentence with the correct word in your grammar journal.
On Wednesday, we do word choice exercises using commonly misused words. On Thursday we do the interactive version as a class so they can check their work and get additional reinforcement. Write the sentence with the correct word in your grammar journal.

23 Read from “The House on Mango Street” and complete some quick writes.
Work with your partner to discuss how symbols are important in literature and in our daily lives. Listen to a lesson about symbols Take notes to refer to later for the task

24 Discussion: What are some symbols that we encounter in our daily lives? Work with your partner to list or draw as many symbols as you can before the timer goes off.

25 How many of these symbols can you identify
How many of these symbols can you identify? Were any of these on your list? Discuss

26 I will circulate while students copy this in their journal to gauge when to change the slide. Since students are paired by ability level (a high with a low), students who don’t finish can copy from their partner. Record the information on the slide in the “Literature Notes” section of your journal.

27 Symbolism in Film This slide is linked to a 7 minute video that students really enjoy. I refer to it throughout the year when we watch movie clips for other lessons. For example, when we watch Romeo and Juliet, I point out how the director uses the colors in the costumes to show group identity and symbolize the contrast in the characters’ temperaments.

28 Classwork While we read, try to keep an eye out for any symbolism in the chapters. What object(s) might stand for more than themselves?  Tip: Look for an object that keeps showing up in different ways or contexts. I include a slide in every lesson that sets a purpose for reading.

29 After Reading With a partner, reread "The Family of Little Feet" and "Chanclas." Focus on the shoes in each chapter.  Explain to the best of your ability what you believe the shoes symbolize.  Write your idea and be sure to explain why you say that. Consider the deeper meaning.

30 This slide is really just a continuation of the previous slide
This slide is really just a continuation of the previous slide. It signals that class is almost over and allows students to wrap up their thoughts and get ready to leave. Wrap up: Think about what we have read so far. Write a paragraph listing and explaining at least one other symbol in the text. What is it and what does it mean?

31 Day Four: “Born Bad” – “The Earl of Tennessee”
Tone

32 Write the sentence with the correct word in your grammar journal.
Students will start this while I am taking role, then we will finish by doing the interactive version online as a class so they can check their work and get additional reinforcement. 100% completion is not the goal, but I do have students who will be able to finish the whole page. I have to plan to challenge the most advanced students or they tend to get bored and cause trouble. Write the sentence with the correct word in your grammar journal.

33 Read from “The House on Mango Street” and complete some quick writes.
Work with your partner to discuss tone and how we identify the tone of a text. Listen to examples of tone. Take notes to refer to later for the task.

34 Copy the information on this slide in the “Literature Notes” section of your journal.

35 Let's look at some examples to get an idea of some examples of tone
Let's look at some examples to get an idea of some examples of tone. Write the adjective that describes the tone for each video. 1. “To This Day” - Shane Koyczan 2. Baba Says “Cool For Thought” 3. Rachel Rostad - "Names" These videos are short and will be used again in other lessons for different purposes. 4. A Hundred Words You Could Say Instead Of Swag - George Watsky

36 Classwork As we read think about the tone of each chapter. Are any similar? Does the tone change at all? We will come back to this after we finish reading.

37 After Reading Identify the tone of the following chapters. For each, write two sentences that support your answer. For example, if the tone is sad, write two sentences from that chapter that are sad. 1. Hips 2. Papa Who Wakes Up Tired in the Dark 3. Elenita, Cards, Palm, Water 4. The First Job (There are 2 tones here, list them both)

38 Wrap up: Discuss your answers with your partner. Were your answers similar? Did the author tell the story with the same tone that you would have used? Explain.

39 Day Five: “Sire” – “A Smart Cookie”
Theme

40 From which point of view is “The House on Mango Street” told?
What is point of view? What are the types? From which point of view is “The House on Mango Street” told? What is symbolism? Give an example. What is tone? Write a sentence from the novel that has a concrete and an abstract noun. Identify each. Write a sentence or two using there, their, and they’re. Fridays are test day. This test should take no more than 10 minutes. Students write on notebook paper and turn the test in for a grade. Some students (the lowest ability levels) are allowed to use their literature notes.

41 Read from “The House on Mango Street” and complete some quick writes.
Work with your partner to discuss how we identify the theme of a text. Listen to a lesson about theme. Take notes to refer to later for the task. Watch a short video and discuss the theme.

42 Copy the information on this slide in the “Literature Notes” section of your journal.

43 Class Work: Watch the following video and think about the theme(s) that are developed.
You can view the film by clicking on the picture.

44 Discussion: Discuss the theme from the film. Justify the theme you chose. What parts of the film serve as evidence to support your choice?

45 Classwork As we read, think about themes that are present.
Be prepared to share.

46 After Reading For each vignette that we read today:
1. Write at least one theme. 2. Record at least 3 sentences from the story that helped you identify the theme that you wrote down. 3. Discuss with your partner. Explain why you identified that as the theme.

47 Wrap up: Think back over what we have read. Which vignette was your favorite? Summarize what the vignette was about, describe the characters, and explain the theme.


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