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“A story becomes a story when it moves past the facts, past the details, to a sequence of events, in which some character is driven by a clear desire,

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Presentation on theme: "“A story becomes a story when it moves past the facts, past the details, to a sequence of events, in which some character is driven by a clear desire,"— Presentation transcript:

1 “A story becomes a story when it moves past the facts, past the details, to a sequence of events, in which some character is driven by a clear desire, acts to realize that desire, and discovers something in doing so.” Can you find a way to weave these basic elements into your story? desire, action, and realization Quote from Center for Digital Storytelling website.

2 In the most basic form, a story has these three elements. Certain materials are included under the fair use exemption of the U.S. Copyright Law and have been prepared according to the multimedia fair use guidelines and are restricted from further use.

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4 Does your audience need a backstory? The backstory can prepare the audience and give them a clearer understanding of the story. You have to know who your audience is. Do you? What do they need to know before the story begins? back·sto·ry n. 1. The experiences of a character or the circumstances of an event that occur before the action or narrative of a literary, cinematic, or dramatic work. 2. A prequel.

5 Somewhere in the beginning is a Consider designing your story with the title at slide 2, 3, 4, or 5…….. Consider leading into your title with a visual sequence. Give your title greater meaning.

6 The middle of the story also has: Action Drama Conflict Special Events Character Development Dramatic structure From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Dramatic structure is the plot structure of a dramatic work such as a play or screenplay. The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle, writing in his Poetics (c. 335 BCE), divided drama into three parts: a beginning, a middle, and an end. In the exposition, the background information that is needed to understand the story proper is provided. Such information includes the protagonist, the antagonist, the basic conflict, the setting, and so forth. The exposition ends with the inciting incident, which is the event in the story's action without which there would be no story. The inciting moment sets the remainder of the story in motion, beginning with the second act, the rising action.

7 Credits at the end are required. Even if all the content is original, you need to credit yourself. Include credits for audio, digital art, any other media that you have used. Include credits for people who directly or indirectly helped you with this story. Start a credits list now, update it as you acquire content, so you have the info when it comes time to add it to your story.

8 DM10 Scripts and Storyboards - What do they need to include? This step in the development process translates your narrative (words), to slide size pieces defining the media, visual sequences that show story progression. Every story needs a beginning, middle, and end. Each have purpose. Look at the lists under each. Which of these are in your story? If they aren’t, can you add them? Maybe you should. Your script and storyboards need to show content samples and specifics for these 3 areas. Content specs include descriptions of background audio, sfx (sound effects), story timing, and transitions. Add specifics or sketch ideas for visual content.

9 The Narrative has been written, the story has been told. What do I do next? Scripts and Storyboards

10 “This book is based on the premise that the fundamental challenge is learning to think and to write visually, that a script is a plan for production.”

11 Consider the difference in the following sentences: A man is sitting in a car watching the entrance to a building … A young man, unshaven, sits in a sports car, watching a woman through binoculars as she comes out of an apartment building.

12 What is visual writing? “Visual writing means making images stand for words. Although visual writing for the screen involves description, it is not necessarily descriptive prose with a lot of adjectives. An image communicates both by logical deduction and emotional implication.”

13 Consider the difference in the following sentences: She was cold and lonely, like the night. The kind of night that makes a person shiver and hurry to find a warm place. The woman standing in the shadows puts on a sweater and quickly crosses the street towards a door lit by a porch light.

14 “The scriptwriters job is to describe action as the camera sees it.” The DM10 Storyteller’s job is to describe the media used in each slide of the story. To describe what the audience sees and hears.

15 Camera Shots to use in your script descriptions ELS or VLS very long shot, includes whole human figure, all of the action, and a good view of the background LS long shot, includes whole human figure from head to foot so the figures are featured rather than the background MS medium shot, usually above the waist, keeping the hands in is one way to visualize the shot CU close up, frames the head and shoulders leaving head room above the head, a close up is about detail ECU extreme close-up, frames the head so the top of the frame clips the forehead and the bottom of the frame clips the neck

16 Describing sound in your scripts categories of sound for your stories SFX sound effects, including background ambient sounds Music choose wisely Narration background voice telling the story Dialogue characters speaking to each other

17 Double Column Script transition visual writing dialogue music / sfx Right side can also include timing notes plus other info and notes needed for story development. Each row can represent a slide, describing content slide-by-slide.

18 The next set of slides is from the Writing book shown here. You can read variations for one video shot. Videos are made with images playing in sequence. Just like your DM10 stories.

19 INT. LIVING ROOM DAY We see a figure in silhouette against a window. Through the window a suburban street is visible with trees. The leaves are falling. It is windy and raining. A car drives past. It has a screaming fan belt. A jogger runs past. His breath is visible. A telephone rings. The figure turns toward camera and we see tears on her face. Read this sample shot description from a script, then go to the next slide for a variation using Camera terms.

20 INT. LIVING ROOM DAY LS with figure in silhouette in foreground against a window — in background through the window a suburban street with trees. Leaves are falling. It is windy and raining. A car up and past. SFX a screaming fan belt. A jogger runs past. His breath is visible. SFX telephone ring. A figure turns and we see ALESSANDRA’s face in CU, tears running down her face. This version has clearer descriptions for the shot (or slide). This version provides clear directions for the person making it.

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22 “a fear of drawing separates a person from that special kind of thinking … I’m referring to visual thinking.” “Visual thinking is commonly acknowledged as among the most creative (thinking) known.” Kit Laybourne Certain materials are included under the fair use exemption of the U.S. Copyright Law and have been prepared according to the multimedia fair use guidelines and are restricted from further use. “But I can’t draw.” “Its an all-too-familiar phrase. It’s also a self-defeating phrase, for it shuts down an individual’s innate impulse to draw.”

23 What is a Storyboard? It is a place to plan out a visual story in two dimensions. The first dimension is time: what happens first, next, and last. The second is interaction: how does the audio information – the voiceover narrative of your story and music - interact with the images or video? In addition, a storyboard can be a notation of where and how visual effects, transitions, animations, compositional organization of the screen - will be used. The art of film storyboarding has taught anyone working on a film, animation, motion graphic, web design, and digital story a singular important lesson. Planning on paper saves enormous amounts of time, energy, and money when it comes time to produce your work. Taking the time to organize your script in the context of a storyboard tells you what you need to illustrate your story. Developed from the selection of images you have in your archive, a storyboard tells you the order in which they will appear and makes your edit go quickly. But much more importantly, especially with our novice storytellers, storyboards clarify what you do not need and save you from scanning, photographing, shooting video, designing in Photoshop, or recording things that simply have no place in this particular story. from The Center for Digital Storytelling – Cookbook.pdf

24 give you a chance to design the basic layout of individual slides, to define the sequence of information, and to define content for slides in the sequence. Following slides show samples of storyboards from professionals and students. Most of the samples are not from digital stories like you are doing in DM10 but the sketches, text information, and different formats can help you decide what style you want to use for your storyboards.

25 Storyboards from Digital Storytelling website: Cookbook.pdf

26 original storyboards from “The Birds” by Alfred Hitchcock

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29 past student storyboards

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31 Storyboards from past DM22 student project. The recipe box is interactive after the box opening animation.

32 Storyboards from past DM10 student. The middle picture shows buttons that would be on the slide for non-linear access to subtopics of information.

33 Which format should I use for my DM10 storyboards? Pencil on paper is recommended using the pdf templates linked from the A6 assignment. Online students will need to scan or take digital pictures of your storyboard pages to submit. Online students also have the option to use Powerpoint or Impress as a storyboard tool. Slides would be used to show content samples and the visual progression of your story without effects, animations, audio, or any other motion media. If you use this method, slide content should be similar to content that would be included in pencil-drawn storyboards. How much detail is needed in my storyboards? The right amount is the amount that works for you and that allows others to understand your plans. Storyboard 3up.pdf Storyboard 4up.pdf

34 Remember this diagram? Will your storyboards show this story structure?

35 “A story becomes a story when it moves past the facts, past the details, to a sequence of events, in which some character is driven by a clear desire, acts to realize that desire, and discovers something in doing so.” Can you find a way to weave these three basic elements into your story? desire, action, and realization Quote from Center for Digital Storytelling website. beginningmiddle ending


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