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Evaluations We deeply value your feedback, and will utilize it in the ongoing development of our courses and services. www.careandcompliance.com/eval.

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Presentation on theme: "Evaluations We deeply value your feedback, and will utilize it in the ongoing development of our courses and services. www.careandcompliance.com/eval."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evaluations We deeply value your feedback, and will utilize it in the ongoing development of our courses and services.

2 OSHA COMPLIANCE IN ASSISTED LIVING AND RESIDENTIAL CARE

3 Total recordable cases of work related injury and illness in ,986,500

4 Fatal work-related injuries 4,609

5 Homicides 458

6 OSHA is increasing the frequency of inspections in assisted living and residential care. During this 4 hour course we will discuss the latest trends in OSHA violations, tips for compliance, and your responsibilities as an administrator/manager. Topics addressed will include injury and illness prevention programs, bloodborne pathogens, personal protective equipment, and reporting requirements. COURSE DESCRIPTION

7 1) Introduction Why OSHA matters? Violations and fines AGENDA

8 2) Back and lifting safety AGENDA

9 3) Bloodborne pathogens and standard precautions AGENDA

10 4) Personal protective equipment AGENDA

11 5) Emergency and disaster preparedness AGENDA

12 6) General workplace safety AGENDA

13 7) Hazard communication AGENDA

14 8) Recordkeeping AGENDA

15 9) Injury and Illness Prevention Programs AGENDA

16 10) Tools, Tips, and Resources AGENDA

17 Introduction to OSHA

18 About OSHA The Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal agency created in 1971 Ensure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women... Most private sector employers are required to follow OSHA regulations INTRODUCTION

19 Why Worry About OSHA? Because you care about your employees INTRODUCTION Your staff are your most valuable asset Reduce work-related injury and illness Quality matters!

20 Why Worry About OSHA? Because accidents cost money INTRODUCTION Workers compensation Modified duty Overtime for temporary fill-in staff Cost of recruiting, hiring, and training new staff

21 Why Worry About OSHA? Avoid OSHA fines! INTRODUCTION Fine can be thousands of dollars! National Emphasis Program

22 $87,430,000 in proposed penalties to BP for the Gulf of Mexico oil spill Largest fine in OSHA's history The prior largest total penalty, $21 million, was issued in 2005, also against BP OSHA FINES

23 Types of OSHA Violations Regulatory Violation General Violation Serious Violation OSHA FINES

24 Types of OSHA Violations Regulatory Violation A violation, other than one defined as Serious or General that pertains to permit, posting, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements as established by regulation or statute. Up to $7,000 per violation OSHA FINES

25 Types of OSHA Violations General Violation A violation which is specifically determined not to be of a serious nature, but has a relationship to occupational safety and health of employees. Up to $7,000 per violation OSHA FINES

26 Types of OSHA Violations Serious Violation Deemed to exist in a place of employment if there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a violation Up to $25,000 per violation OSHA FINES

27 National Emphasis Program Implemented by OSHA in 2012F Focus attention and inspections on nursing homes and assisted living/residential care communities Increased reports of OSHA inspections from providers pdf pdf INTRODUCTION

28 National Emphasis Program Lifting Bloodborne pathogens Tuberculosis Workplace violence Slips, trips and falls INTRODUCTION

29 National Emphasis Program “During inspections under this Instruction, the OSHA-300 logs for the previous three (3) years will be reviewed.” DART will be calculated If over 5.3 = inspect INTRODUCTION

30 DART Days away from work, Days of restricted work activity, or Job transfer DART

31 Calculating your DART rate: DART X200,000 ÷ = Total recordable cases # hours worked by all employees DART Rate

32 Calculating your DART rate: DART 2110,000 X200,000 ÷ = Total recordable cases # hours worked by all employees 3.6 DART Rate

33 DART

34

35 Back and Lifting Safety

36 Cases involving injury to the back 182,270

37 General lifting safety tips: Avoid manual lifting of residents whenever possible Get help for heavy objects Split into smaller loads if possible BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

38 Posture is critical! Use a wide stance and bend at the knees BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

39 Posture is critical! Move slowly and avoid sudden movements Keep the weight as close to your body as possible Avoid lifting above the waist line Turn the whole body, do not twist BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

40 Get help when you need it: Help from another person Help from a device or mechanical aide BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

41 Gait belts Use for transferring residents who are partially dependent, have some weight-bearing capacity, are cooperative Use when assisting to ambulate More than one caregiver may be needed Do not use to “lift” the resident Use good body mechanics and a rocking and pulling motion rather than lifting when using a belt BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

42 Gait belts May not be suitable for ambulation of heavy residents or residents with recent abdominal or back surgery, abdominal aneurysm, etc Ensure belt is securely fastened Ensure a layer of clothing is between residents' skin and the belt Keep resident as close as possible to caregiver during transfer BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

43 Powered sit-to-stand or standing assist device Use for transferring residents who are partially dependent, have some weight-bearing capacity, are cooperative, can sit up on the edge of the bed with or without assistance, and are able to bend hips, knees, and ankles. BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

44 Lift chairs Transferring residents who are weight-bearing and cooperative but need assistance when standing and ambulating. Can be used for independent residents who need an extra boost to stand. May not be appropriate for heavier residents BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

45 Mechanical lifts Lifting residents who are totally dependent, are partial- or non- weight bearing, are very heavy, or have other physical limitations More than one caregiver may be needed Follow manufacturer instructions BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

46 Draw sheets, transfer boards Use for repositioning More than one caregiver may be needed Work at waist level when possible Avoid bending/reaching Synchronize with other caregivers, which applicable BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

47 Height adjustable bed Follow regulations regarding bed rails Electric powered preferred Adjustments should be completed within about 20 seconds to ensure use BACK AND LIFTING SAFETY

48 Wheelchair scale Transfer bench Toilet seat riser Grab bars

49 Bloodborne Pathogens

50 Infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans Include hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries may expose workers to bloodborne pathogens BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

51 Occupational exposure: Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral (piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needlesticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions) contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee's duties. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

52 Who is at risk for occupational exposure in your workplace? _____________________________ BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

53 Exposure Control Plan (ECP) Employers must implement Details on employee protection measures Use of engineering and work practice controls Use of personal protective clothing and equipment Training, medical surveillance, hepatitis B vaccinations, and signs and labels BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

54 Exposure Control Plan (ECP) A copy must be accessible to employees Must be updated at least annually and whenever necessary Must include staff training BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

55 Sharps Injury Log Date and time of the exposure incident Type and brand of sharp involved in the exposure incident Description of the exposure incident Each exposure incident shall be recorded on the Sharps Injury Log within 14 working days of the date the incident is reported to the employer Must protect the confidentiality of the injured employee. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

56 Hepatitis B Vaccines Make available the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series to all employees who have occupational exposure Must be made available at no cost to the employee Must be made available after training and within 10 days of initial assignment Post-exposure evaluation and follow-up for bloodborne pathogens exposure to all employees who have had an exposure incident Document! BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

57 "Personal Protective Equipment" is specialized clothing or equipment worn or used by an employee for protection against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts or blouses) not intended to function as protection against a hazard are not considered to be personal protective equipment. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

58 Must be provided by the employer Must be readily available to appropriate personnel Maintain appropriate sizes, etc. Provide training in use, donning, and removing PERSONNEL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

59 Disaster and Emergency Preparedness

60 Planning Chain of command Emergency response teams Response activities Training Personal protection Medical assistance DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

61 Fire Wildfires Earthquakes Hurricanes Tornadoes Floods Power failure DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Elevator failure Bomb threats Workplace violence

62 Evacuations 72-hour self-reliance Staff training DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

63

64

65 Hazard Communication

66 Chemical manufacturers and importers must prepare labels and safety data sheets Employers with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces must have labels and safety data sheets for their exposed workers Employers must train staff to handle the chemicals appropriately HAZARD COMMUNICATION

67 Hazard communication program Labels SDS Information and training HAZARD COMMUNICATION

68 Labels The manufacturer, importer, or distributor is required to label each container of hazardous chemicals If the hazardous chemicals are transferred into unmarked containers, these containers must be labeled with the required information HAZARD COMMUNICATION

69 Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Provided by chemical manufacturers Indicate possible hazards resulting from use of the material Must have a SDS for each hazardous substance used in the workplace Shall be in English Must be readily accessible during each work shift to employees when they are in their work area(s) HAZARD COMMUNICATION

70 Do you need to keep MSDSs for commercial products such as "Windex" and "White-Out"? OSHA does not require that MSDSs be provided to purchasers of household consumer products when the products are used in the workplace in the same manner that a consumer would use them, i.e.; where the duration and frequency of use (and therefore exposure) is not greater than what the typical consumer would experience. This exemption in OSHA's regulation is based, however, not upon the chemical manufacturer's intended use of his product, but upon how it actually is used in the workplace. Employees who are required to work with hazardous chemicals in a manner that results in a duration and frequency of exposure greater than what a normal consumer would experience have a right to know about the properties of those hazardous chemicals. HAZARD COMMUNICATION

71 Globally Harmonized System

72 The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) International approach to hazard communication, based on major existing systems around the world, including OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard Agreed criteria for classification of chemical hazards, and a standardized approach to label elements and safety data sheets Updates to OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html WHAT IS THE GLOBALLY HARMONIZED SYSTEM?

73 Health and safety of workers Standardization Improve information received from other countries WHY?

74 Chemical manufacturers or importers must classify the hazards of chemicals which they produce or import Employers must provide information to their employees about the hazardous chemicals to which they are exposed, by means of a hazard communication program, labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and information and training. Applies to any chemical which is known to be present in the workplace in such a manner that employees may be exposed under normal conditions of use or in a foreseeable emergency. WHO MUST FOLLOW GHS?

75 Due Dates

76 December 1, 2013 Employee training GHS DUE DATES December 1, 2015 Distributors shall not ship containers without GHS labels 2017 June 1, 2015 Compliance with all provisions June 1, 2016 Update alternative workplace labels

77 DECEMBER 1, 2013 RequirementWho Train employees on the new label elements and safety data sheet (SDS) format. Employers

78 JUNE 1, 2015 RequirementWho Compliance with all modified provisions of the final rule Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers

79 DECEMBER 1, 2015 RequirementWho Distributors shall not ship containers labeled by the chemical manufacturer or importer unless it is a GHS label Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers

80 JUNE 1, 2016 RequirementWho Update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards. Employers

81 During the phase-in period, employers are required to be in compliance with either the existing HCS or the revised HCS, or both OSHA recognizes that hazard communication programs will go through a period of time where labels and SDSs under both standards will be present in the workplace This will be considered acceptable, and employers are not required to maintain two sets of labels and SDSs for compliance purposes PHASE IN PERIOD

82 Changes to Hazard Communication

83 Hazard classification Labels Safety Data Sheets MAJOR CHANGES TO HAZCOM

84 Definitions of hazard have been changed to provide specific criteria for classification of health and physical hazards, as well as classification of mixtures. Ensure that evaluations of hazardous effects are consistent across manufacturers Ensure that labels and safety data sheets are more accurate as a result HAZARD CLASSIFICATION

85 Pictograms Signal words: a single word used to indicate the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. "Danger" is used for the more severe hazards, while "warning" is used for less severe hazards. Hazard Statement: a statement assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard. Precautionary Statement: a phrase that describes recommended measures to be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, or improper storage or handling of a hazardous chemical. LABELS

86 PICTOGRAMS

87 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Information required on the safety data sheet will remain essentially the same The revised Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom 2012) requires that the information on the SDS be presented using specific headings in a specified sequence SAFETY DATA SHEETS

88 Section 1. Identification Section 2. Hazard(s) identification Section 3. Composition/information on ingredients Section 4. First-Aid measures Section 5. Fire-fighting measures Section 6. Accidental release measures Section 7. Handling and storage Section 8. Exposure controls/personal protection SAFETY DATA SHEETS

89 Section 9. Physical and chemical properties Section 10. Stability and reactivity Section 11. Toxicological information Section 12. Ecological information Section 13. Disposal considerations Section 14. Transport information Section 15. Regulatory information Section 16. Other information, including date of preparation or last revision SAFETY DATA SHEETS

90 Recordkeeping

91 Employers not exempt from OSHA's recordkeeping requirements must prepare and maintain records of work-related injuries and illnesses. Form 300, 300A, 301 RECORDKEEPING

92 Exempt if: If you had 10 or fewer employees during all of the last calendar year, or Your business is classified in a specific low-hazard retail, service, finance, insurance, or real estate industry (Unless the Bureau of Labor Statistics or OSHA informs you in writing that you must do so) RECORDKEEPING

93 Current and former employees, or their representatives, have the right to access injury and illness records. Employers must give the requester a copy of the relevant record(s) by the end of the next business day. RECORDKEEPING

94 When is an injury or illness considered work-related? If an event or exposure in the work environment caused or contributed to the condition or significantly aggravated a preexisting condition. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the workplace, unless an exception specifically applies. The work environment includes the establishment and other locations where one or more employees are working or are present as a condition of their employment. RECORDKEEPING

95 What injuries must be recorded? Record those work-related injuries and illnesses that result in: Death Loss of consciousness Days away from work Restricted work activity or job transfer Medical treatment beyond first aid RECORDKEEPING

96 What injuries must be recorded? You must record any significant work-related injury or illness that is diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional. You must record any work-related case involving cancer, chronic irreversible disease, a fractured or cracked bone, or a punctured eardrum. RECORDKEEPING

97 Form 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses Used to list injuries and illnesses and track days away from work, restricted, or transferred RECORDKEEPING

98

99 Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses Shows totals for the year in each category Must post from February 1 to April 30 of each year RECORDKEEPING

100

101 Keeping injury and illness records: Injury and Illness Report (Form 301) to record supplementary information about recordable cases. You can use a workers' compensation or insurance form, if it contains the same information. RECORDKEEPING

102 RECORDKEEPING

103 Injury and Illness Prevention Programs

104 Employers are required to have an effective written Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) An effective IIPP improves the safety and health in your workplace. INJURY & ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAMS

105 An IIPP must : Fully involve all employees, supervisors, and management Identify the specific workplace hazards employees are exposed to Correct identified hazards in an appropriate and timely manner Provide effective training INJURY & ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAMS

106 Your IIPP must include: Responsibility Compliance Communication Hazard Assessment Accident/Exposure Investigation Hazard Correction Training and Instruction Recordkeeping INJURY & ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAMS

107 Tools, Tips, and Resources

108 Create a safety committee TOOLS, TIPS, AND RESOURCES

109 STAFF TRAINING TOPIC SUPER. / MNGRS. EMP.FREQUENCY Employee recordsXXInitial, annual Accident investigation and reportingXXInitial Aerosol transmissible diseasesXXInitial, annual Back safetyXXInitial, annual Bloodborne pathogensXXInitial, annual Compressed gasXXInitial, as needed Emergency and disaster planningXX Electrical safetyXX Fire safety, preventionXXInitial, annual ErgonomicsXX First AidXXInitial, as needed

110 STAFF TRAINING TOPIC SUPER. / MNGRS. EMP.FREQUENCY Flammable and combustible liquidsXXInitial, as needed General safety awarenessXX Power toolsXXInitial, as needed Hazard communicationXXInitial, annual OSHA recordkeepingX Personal protective equipmentXXInitial, as needed Portable ladder safetyXXInitial, as needed IIPPXXInitial, as needed Walking and working surfacesXX

111 TOOLS, TIPS, AND RESOURCES

112 Free consultation service Does not result in citations or penalties TOOLS, TIPS, AND RESOURCES

113

114 ANY QUESTIONS?

115 Quiz

116 OSHA is a ________ agency that was created in a. State b. County c. Federal d. International QUESTION #1

117 OSHA is a ________ agency that was created in a. State b. County c. Federal d. International QUESTION #1

118 Which of the following is not one of the types of OSHA violations? a. Incident b. Regulatory c. General d. Serious QUESTION #2

119 Which of the following is not one of the types of OSHA violations? a. Incident b. Regulatory c. General d. Serious QUESTION #2

120 Which of the following are important points for back and lifting safety when training your staff? a. Posture b. Avoid lifting above the waist line c. Ask for assistance from another person whenever necessary d. All of the above QUESTION #3

121 Which of the following are important points for back and lifting safety when training your staff? a. Posture b. Avoid lifting above the waist line c. Ask for assistance from another person whenever necessary d. All of the above QUESTION #3

122 A gait belt is an effective tool when helping to pick up a resident after a fall. a. True b. False QUESTION #4

123 A gait belt is an effective tool when helping to pick up a resident after a fall. a. True b. False QUESTION #4

124 With regards to blood borne pathogens, ECP stands for: a. Electric Control Posture b. Exposure Control Plan c. Exposure Containment Program d. Extended Control Profile QUESTION #5

125 With regards to blood borne pathogens, ECP stands for: a. Electric Control Posture b. Exposure Control Plan c. Exposure Containment Program d. Extended Control Profile QUESTION #5

126 HIV vaccines must be made available at no cost to all employees. a. True b. False QUESTION #6

127 HIV vaccines must be made available at no cost to all employees. a. True b. False QUESTION #6

128 This liquid combined with water makes a commonly used and effective disinfectant: a. Soap b. Windex c. Lysol d. Bleach QUESTION #7

129 This liquid combined with water makes a commonly used and effective disinfectant: a. Soap b. Windex c. Lysol d. Bleach QUESTION #7

130 Because of changes in the Globally Harmonized System, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called what? a. Material Sheets b. Safety Data Sheets c. Mandatory Data Sheets d. Chemical Sheets QUESTION #8

131 Because of changes in the Globally Harmonized System, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called what? a. Material Sheets b. Safety Data Sheets c. Mandatory Data Sheets d. Chemical Sheets QUESTION #8

132 Chemical labels must now include which of the following: a. Pictograms b. Signal words c. Hazard statement d. Precautionary statement e. All of the above QUESTION #9

133 Chemical labels must now include which of the following: a. Pictograms b. Signal words c. Hazard statement d. Precautionary statement e. All of the above QUESTION #9

134 When does the Form 300A have to be posted? a. From February 1 to April 30 of each year b. From January 1 to December 31 of each year c. From May 1 to May 31 of each year d. None of the above QUESTION #10

135 When does the Form 300A have to be posted? a. From February 1 to April 30 of each year b. From January 1 to December 31 of each year c. From May 1 to May 31 of each year d. None of the above QUESTION #10

136 Evaluation If you have not completed your evaluation please take time to complete when time permits, your feedback is greatly appreciated.


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