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HEADS UP TACKLING Component 3. TERMINOLOGY As a coach, our words convey powerful messages and tell young players what is important What are you actually.

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Presentation on theme: "HEADS UP TACKLING Component 3. TERMINOLOGY As a coach, our words convey powerful messages and tell young players what is important What are you actually."— Presentation transcript:

1 HEADS UP TACKLING Component 3

2 TERMINOLOGY As a coach, our words convey powerful messages and tell young players what is important What are you actually telling your player to do? Point of contact Consistent terminology leads to better teaching

3 PSYCHOLOGY OF BUILDING CONFIDENCE Some youths are instinctively aggressive and eager for contact; many more have some initial reservation –The initial fear is real How to overcome the fear Confidence comes through repeated success Look for behavior signs of youngsters lacking confidence Kids play sports for fun Levels of Contact

4 LEVELS OF CONTACT AIRLIVE ACTIONTHUDCONTROLBAGS Players run a drill unopposed without contact. Drill is run against a bag or another soft- contact surface. Drill is run at assigned speed until the moment of contact; one player is pre-determined the “winner” by the coach. Contact remains above the waist and players stay on their feet. Drill is run at assigned speed through the moment of contact; no pre- determined “winner.” Contact remains above the waist, players stay on their feet and a quick whistle ends the drill. Drill is run in game- like conditions and is the only time that players are taken to the ground.

5 BREAKDOWN BUZZ HIT POSITION SHOOT RIP TACKLE PROGRESSION

6 POINTS OF CONTACT & TERMINOLOGY The point of contact is the area of the tackler that makes contact first with an opposing ball-carrier USA Football teaches the shoulder tackle as part of its Heads Up Tackling program The defender “slides” his head to the side of an oncoming ball- carrier as he initiates contact

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8 BREAKDOWN Knees bent, feet shoulder-width apart, upper body in a 45-degree lean, chin up and over toes Weight on balls of feet (not toes) Players gather themselves in a breakdown position when “buzzing” the feet Teaching progression: FEET  SQUEEZE  SINK  HANDS

9 BUZZ Quick, choppy, heel-to-toe steps to bring the body under control while continuing to gain ground Once within “striking distance” of ball-carrier, buzz feet to widen base and sink the hips Keep original 45-degree lean

10 HIT POSITION Body position at moment of impact After closing to the ball-carrier, take a short downhill power step Have a bend in both knees, with back foot directly under your hips Head and eyes up, shoulders square to contact

11 SHOOT Forcefully explode hips open and upward Use large muscle groups of lower body to produce a powerful tackle To finish, continue to the drive legs while working up and through opponent

12 RIP Upper body movement to secure the tackle “Punch” both arms in an uppercut motion to backside of ball-carrier Work up and through, not around; “climb” the ball-carrier Secure tackle by “grabbing cloth” at back of ball-carrier’s jersey with elbows tight to his sides

13 HEADS UP FOOTBALL DRILLS PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER ① Step-Over Tackle ② Pop-Up Tackle INTRODUCTION TO CONTACT ① One Foot Tackle ② Freeze Tackle BASICS ① Straight-On Tackle ② Angle Tackle ③ Lane Tackle ④ Open Field Tackle FIX/FOCUS ① Leverage Tackle ② Three Rips ③ Grapple Tackle ④ Finish Tackle ⑤ Bag Series

14 TACKLE CIRCUIT Integrate this period into your practice plan Tackling is the most important all-player skill A separate period conveys its importance Teams that tackle well are competitive Basics 10 to 20 minutes every practice Multiple stations Maximize number of reps Small groups Individual attention One coach per station Change levels of contact Air, Bags, Control, Thud Keep players on their feet

15 TACKLE CIRCUIT PROGRAMMING EARLY SEASON Follow skill progression Same skill all stations Instill circuit to create habit Acclimate using Levels of Contact IN-SEASON Different drills at each station Focus on more skills per session In-week progression Seasonal volume Levels of contact TROUBLESHOOTING Circuit drills as the “fix” Why players/teams miss tackles? Correlate drill responsible for THAT fundamental

16 Using proper verbiage for a safer, more positive game Helping players and parents become more confident in the collision How to use Levels of Contact to control total contact in practice and teach in a progressive manner The 5 fundamentals of Heads Up Tackling Applying the 5 fundamentals to other tackle drills What A Coach Needs To Know


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